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View Poll Results: Snake most likely to put you in a coffin?
Cottonmouth 27 26.21%
Copperhead 6 5.83%
Rattlesnake 40 38.83%
Coral Snake 30 29.13%
Voters: 103. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-28-2011, 04:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pocomoonskyeyes View Post
After watching the video, I doubt that was a cottonmouth. For it's length it was too thin. Pit vipers tend to be thicker bodied and when threatened try to look even fatter by broadening their body. Without actually seeing this snake better, I would guess it was actually a Gray or black rat snake.
Actually after watching the video again It's probably a
Pine Snake


This is a Cottonmouth. Notice the "Speckling" of the belly. Also how much thicker it is for a snake of about the same length.


The snake in the video has an almost totally white belly. I'm fairly certain (@95% sure) it's NOT a Cottonmouth or Water Moccasin. Although Agkistrodon piscivorous AKA Water Moccasin has a narrower head than Most other pit vipers in the US, it still has a noticeable difference in head size when compared to the body.





Old 07-28-2011, 05:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robbiec View Post
unfortunately, your choices are misleading! There are a LOT of different species (32 known) of rattlesnake, some very deadly, some not so much.

While coral snakes have a very deadly neurotoxic venom that is nearly impossible to find antivenom for at the moment, it is very unaggressive. If you aren't picking it up, you are unlikely to get bit by one.

Mojave rattlesnake, western diamondbacks, eastern diamondbacks and southern pacific rattlesnakes are all extremely dangerous and common enough that encounters are frequent. Any of these species can deliver a lethal bite easily.

Water moccasins rarely cause death, but frequently cause massive tissue loss and sometimes amputations are necessary.

Copperheads very rarely cause death, but fingers are often lost due to tissue damage.
I totally agree with you.
I voted for the Coral Snake just on the thought of "IF bitten".

Water Moccasins sometimes congregate and multiple bites from multiple snakes would surely kill and fast. Yet the same is true of Rattlers "Denning up". I believe a western species of Rattler is the most worrisome if bitten, just not exactly which particular species it is...Black Tailed, Mojave, or some such....it has BOTH a Neurotoxin and a Hemotoxin.
Old 07-28-2011, 06:00 PM
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Well the only venomous snakes I have in my area are a couple different kinds of rattlers, and TBH I think rattlers are the nicest of the venomous snakes, I mean at least they give you a warning before they bite, other snakes aren't so nice...
Old 07-28-2011, 06:23 PM
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We have some rattlers around here, a few coral snakes but the only ones that worry me are the cottonmouths. They tend to be more aggressive. Every rattler or coral snake i have seen have either retreated or else held thier ground allowing me to. Cottonmouths on the other hand, I have had them come up to the boat while fishing and swim near a group of us that were swimming. Needless to say they developed a case of lead poisoning. If they leave me alone I will leave them alone, but moccasins sometimes wont. They will activley chase you.
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Old 07-28-2011, 07:05 PM
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Killed lots of rattlers in my time ,eaten a few too.
aside from them and gopher and racers haven't see much else.
Old 07-28-2011, 07:35 PM
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i voted cottenmouth because they are agressive they are NOT afraid of ppl. i know the pros say they dont but i have had them come after me so i think you have more of a chance being bit by a cottenmouth
Old 07-28-2011, 07:55 PM
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I currently live in the Mohave desert. We have a snake called the Mohave green, no crap, it is the color of Mtn Dew right after it sheds it's skin. The damn thing is a relative of the water moccasin, it has both types of venom, and it is aggressive.

All the other snakes I've seen in western north America, sidewinders, diamond backs, desert rattles will all try and escape. I will let them do so. Mohave greens and moccasins will try and attack. They don't live long.
Old 07-28-2011, 07:56 PM
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I voted rattle snake . More specific - the eastern diamond back . They are big , have huge fangs and pack lots of venom . You could die in 15 minutes from their bite .
The coral snake has the most powerfull venom but it doesn't have big fangs . It more or less has to chew on you to get the venom in .
Old 07-28-2011, 08:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dac View Post
the coral snake because last time I checked anti venom was no longer made for its bite.
Sometimes the reptile houses of zoos will make it. Sometimes it is not commercially available, but it is still available.

As for the one that is most likely to end you on the North American continent, the Mojave Rattler. It has venom that is not only hemotoxic, it's neurotoxic as well. Evolution has been kind to this rattler.
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Old 07-28-2011, 08:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by S.P.Q.R. View Post
I think rattlers are the nicest of the venomous snakes, I mean at least they give you a warning before they bite, other snakes aren't so nice...
Maybe they're nicer out in the desert, I've run into a few Timbers in Appalachia that didn't really feel like rattling at all apparently.

Sometimes they break their buttons off as well. Don't have a rattler to rattle. Bottom line, I wouldn't bet my life on the kindless of a reptile.
Old 07-28-2011, 08:22 PM
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I voted cottonmouth, because that is the only snake I know that will chase you. Copperheads are a nuisance and rattlers don't care for populated areas around here, but the cottonmouth loves being anywhere near water, even the lake here in my town.
Old 07-28-2011, 08:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aussie Mike View Post
Black Mamba is only about #5 or so on the list. Inland taipan or fierce snake is #1 deadliest land snake. I think it's the Belcher sea snake that has the deadliest venom. Yea, when God was done with making everything else, he was like, now where do i put all the deadliest creatures, oh yea, Australia, no-one will live there! In all the years Steve worked with snakes, not once did he get bitten by a venomous snake.
I thoght Steve got bit by that little one... with the fangs that come out the side of mouth?
Old 07-28-2011, 11:08 PM
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Paramedics, SAR, etc. don't carry any kind of antivenin. If you get to a hospital there is no reason a Coral snake should be lethal. They just put you on a ventilator until your body metabolizes the venom. If you don't, the antivenin doesn't matter. NIH says there are 15-25 coral snake bites in the United States each year. It costs millions of dollars to produce antivenin for a couple dozen cases annually. Not profitable at all. Since hospitals have an alternative treatment, why bother? At least that is the reasoning.

Mexico still produces the stuff and that is what you see in the reptile house at the Zoo. Not legal for hospitals to use because it isn't FDA approved. That would cost millions of dollars itself.

For my money the Eastern and Western diamondbacks and the Mojave green are the most likely bites to cause death. The former because the volume of venom is so high and the latter because the neurotoxin makes for a lethal cocktail.
Old 07-28-2011, 11:17 PM
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The only thing we ever have around here is copperheads we've been here twelve years and between dad and I we have killed maybe five or six. I have however spotted a congregation of water moccasins out on a lake I fish from time to time. I stayed on my side and they stayed on their side... all was well
Old 07-29-2011, 04:24 PM
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Down south it is the dreaded Coral banded copper water rattler.
Old 07-30-2011, 12:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Saint View Post
a coral snakes venom is indeed very deadly but it is a rear fanged snake, very shy and unless you are a frequent diver the odds of you encountering one and then being bitten are incredibly low.
Incorrect. The coral snake (Micrurus sp.) is not a rear fanged snake. Venomous snakes in the family Colubridae have fangs in the rear, more correctly, under the eyes.
Corals are of the family Elapidae, They have short, fixed front fangs like a cobra, krait, Taipan, etc. A large coral doesn't need to "chew" to inject venom and can give you a lethal bite pretty quick. Smaller corals will need to hang on and chew, but not very long.
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Old 07-30-2011, 12:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pocomoonskyeyes View Post
I totally agree with you.
I voted for the Coral Snake just on the thought of "IF bitten".

Water Moccasins sometimes congregate and multiple bites from multiple snakes would surely kill and fast. Yet the same is true of Rattlers "Denning up". I believe a western species of Rattler is the most worrisome if bitten, just not exactly which particular species it is...Black Tailed, Mojave, or some such....it has BOTH a Neurotoxin and a Hemotoxin.
The Tiger rattlesnake has both neuro and hemotoxic/cytotoxic venom, as does the Panamint rattlesnake. The type A Mojave (C.Scutulatus) has a potent neurotoxic venom. They also very closely resemble the Western Diamondback (C.Atrox).

Snakes you can compare venom toxicity to:

Mojave rattlesnake venom (6-8mg/est.lethal dose) is as potent as tiger snake venom (6-10mg est. lethal dose) and is even more dangerous in the respect that a tiger snake will try and get out of your way when surprised, The Mojave will stand its ground alot of times.

Coral snake venom is as deadly as the Krait (Bungarus candidus). It takes less than 2mg/Coral snake venom to kill a healthy, full grown human adult. That is about the volume of four or five grains of salt! Corals carry anywhere from 4mg/venom to 10mg/venom depending on the size of the snake. They carry at LEAST one lethal dose.
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Old 07-30-2011, 01:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pocomoonskyeyes View Post
Huh? You don't have to be a Diver to encounter a Coral snake. They like to stay hidden under leaf litter. They are in the same family as a Cobra and are the MOST Venomous snake in the US. Just because their fangs are in the rear is a moot point. A Coral snakes fangs are grooved instead of hollow. Instead of the venom ONLY going through the fangs it can literally flood the Coral snakes mouth. Punctures from the other teeth will allow the venom in the wounds. It is a HIGHLY Toxic Neurovenom. It will stop the involuntary muscles (I.E. the heart and lungs)

Of all the poisonous snakes Native to the US it is one of the least likely to bite, but also the most likely to kill.
http://animals.nationalgeographic.co...n-coral-snake/

One myth that even this National Geographic site perpetuates is this....
"They must literally chew on their victim to inject their venom fully, so most bites to humans don't result in death. " Sheer nonsense. If it BREAKS the skin, and is injecting venom, that's all it takes. No one has died since 1967 from a Coral snake, But IF Bitten, It is the most likely to kill you. Most people miss the part I've placed in bold, when quoting this.

I've worked with Rattlers, Cottonmouths, Copperheads and Coral Snakes. I stood MORE of a chance of being bitten by the others, but IF bitten the Coral was the MOST likely to cause death. BTW I've never been bitten.
Umm.... Two men were killed by the same coral snake in Florida two years ago. NOTE!!!!! Coral snakes have FIXED GROOVED fangs in the FRONT of their mouths. ALL elapids have fixed fangs in the FRONT of their mouths. Colubrids like the boomslang, twig snake, hognose snake etc have fangs directly under their eyes (Rear-fanged).
You also have to be careful with corals. We had one at the Cincinnati zoo that would wildly flail around if you picked it up and would swing around and bite you in a heartbeat! That particular snake was 40 inches long and heavy bodied for a coral. It also had long enough fangs in the FRONT of its mouth that could deliver venom with a pretty quick bite. In fact, about half the corals I've handled will exhibit the same behavior while displaying cloacal popping.
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Old 07-30-2011, 01:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcArthur View Post
Paramedics, SAR, etc. don't carry any kind of antivenin. If you get to a hospital there is no reason a Coral snake should be lethal. They just put you on a ventilator until your body metabolizes the venom. If you don't, the antivenin doesn't matter. NIH says there are 15-25 coral snake bites in the United States each year. It costs millions of dollars to produce antivenin for a couple dozen cases annually. Not profitable at all. Since hospitals have an alternative treatment, why bother? At least that is the reasoning.

Mexico still produces the stuff and that is what you see in the reptile house at the Zoo. Not legal for hospitals to use because it isn't FDA approved. That would cost millions of dollars itself.

For my money the Eastern and Western diamondbacks and the Mojave green are the most likely bites to cause death. The former because the volume of venom is so high and the latter because the neurotoxin makes for a lethal cocktail.
I completely agree on this.
Old 07-30-2011, 02:02 AM
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Taipan.
Death Adder.
Brown.
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