Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > Survival & Preparedness Forum > Financial Forum
Articles Chat Room Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files



Financial Forum Economics and Precious Metals

Advertise Here
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-05-2011, 11:01 PM
Xelera's Avatar
Xelera Xelera is offline
Senior Reactor Operator
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1,008
Thanks: 1,672
Thanked 1,787 Times in 622 Posts
Default Hyperinflation discussion



Advertise Here

For all you financial gurus out there... I was reading up on hyperinflation, and have a couple of questions. Using Wikipedia as a reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperinflation

1. It appears almost every country, some countries twice, for a total of 32 defined instances of hyperinflation this century (33 if you go back another fifty years to the confederacy) all entered that condition, with the concurrent printing of money. What I noticed though, was not that they article says how much money was printed, but in almost every case, it mentions the denomination SIZE that was printed...

For example, Angola in 1991, the highest denomination was 50,000 AON. By 1994 it was up to 500,000, and a year later, after a currency reform, they were up to 5,000,000.

Same for Belarus: they went from a largest denomination of 5000 rublei in 1993, to 5,000,000 just 6 years later. After some currency reforms in 2000, where they changed currencies, and set exchange rates, their newest currency, is up to 100,000 rublei, equal to over ONE HUNDRED MILLION pre-2000 rublei.

2. As a cure for hyperinflation, Israel, after seeing an increase in inflation, from a "meager" 13% in 1971, to 445% in 1984 for over a FACTOR of 34 increase (whereas American inflation doubles approximately every 20 years) instituted government mandated price freezes. Within a few months, inflation halved, and within a year, it was back down to 19%.

3. Robert Mugabe, Zimbabwe, 1998... instituted a program that took farmland and equipment from white farmers, and re-allocated it to black farmers... the result was a bunch of defunct farms, loss of revenue to the government from food exports, and the government having to print money to pay debts. Sounds similar to reparations or wealth redistribution...

Questions:

Could our country, or the EU, IMF, etc... see printing LARGER notes as a harbinger of doom, and rather than print larger notes, try to sneak it under the radar by printing massive quantities of smaller notes? Since hyperinflation tends to be driven by a loss of faith in a currency, where recipients try to exchange the currency for commodities as soon as they get it, before losing more value, would a governing body be able to suppress (even temporarily) the onset of hyperinflation, simply by not blundering into the previous trap of printing larger denominations?

The article on Israel did not specify if they printed more, or larger currencies, or if it was just runaway inflation. It seems that government action WAS able to reign in runaway inflation. I understand the dollar is a bit different, as it is the world reserve currency, but what would prevent actions of the government from getting it back under control? That of course, assuming the powers that be, don't actually want hyperinflation to occur, to justify joining into a one-world currency...

Once hyperinflation starts, could it be stopped in America's case, by government price freezes, currency exchanges, etc... why or why not? I understand many of the countries listed, probably didn't carry the debt over a generation, that we generate in a year, so that may be a factor too.

One last question, regarding currency exchanges. Would coins be subject to those as well? For example, if America exchanges $1000 old dollars, for $1 new dollar, even if coins were the clad coins they are today, would they retain value under the new system? I've read some people arguing in favor of hording regular nickels, in the event we hit hyperinflation as they are worth more than the face value currently, but I don't see a few grams of copper and nickel, both valued by the pound, being worth much in a hyperinflation scenario, if the government does a currency exchange and declares these coins not legal tender.

Just some late night musings...
Old 06-05-2011, 11:26 PM
Steverino's Avatar
Steverino Steverino is offline
Washington was right....
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: SillyCon Valley
Posts: 5,722
Thanks: 2,150
Thanked 9,954 Times in 3,468 Posts
Default

I'm no "guru"... but here's my .02


Quote:
Originally Posted by Xelera View Post
Questions:

Could our country, or the EU, IMF, etc... see printing LARGER notes as a harbinger of doom, and rather than print larger notes, try to sneak it under the radar by printing massive quantities of smaller notes? Since hyperinflation tends to be driven by a loss of faith in a currency, where recipients try to exchange the currency for commodities as soon as they get it, before losing more value, would a governing body be able to suppress (even temporarily) the onset of hyperinflation, simply by not blundering into the previous trap of printing larger denominations?
I'm not sure this would work, as Joe Citizen would still be furiously trying to exchange his dollars for real goods regardless of the individual note value.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Xelera View Post
The article on Israel did not specify if they printed more, or larger currencies, or if it was just runaway inflation. It seems that government action WAS able to reign in runaway inflation. I understand the dollar is a bit different, as it is the world reserve currency, but what would prevent actions of the government from getting it back under control? That of course, assuming the powers that be, don't actually want hyperinflation to occur, to justify joining into a one-world currency...
Stemming inflation with price controls is an interesting scenario... I'm assuming they were also managing (reducing ) the money supply in the economy. Its possible that the inflation they experienced was the "good kind" that is demand based... not the bad kind that is simply wrought through expansion of the money supply...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xelera View Post
Once hyperinflation starts, could it be stopped in America's case, by government price freezes, currency exchanges, etc... why or why not? I understand many of the countries listed, probably didn't carry the debt over a generation, that we generate in a year, so that may be a factor too.
I'd venture a hyper-inflationary scenario in the US would CRUSH the US capital markets. Credit would halt (look at how bad it got with this burp)... so business would also be crushed.

I would not want to ride that roller coaster...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Xelera View Post
One last question, regarding currency exchanges. Would coins be subject to those as well? For example, if America exchanges $1000 old dollars, for $1 new dollar, even if coins were the clad coins they are today, would they retain value under the new system? I've read some people arguing in favor of hording regular nickels, in the event we hit hyperinflation as they are worth more than the face value currently, but I don't see a few grams of copper and nickel, both valued by the pound, being worth much in a hyperinflation scenario, if the government does a currency exchange and declares these coins not legal tender.
I'd have to assume that all forms of currency would be required turned in, to be re-minted into new coins...

If the government declares existing coins "not legal tender" then they are simply metal slugs... to be melted down and resold.
Old 06-05-2011, 11:51 PM
Victor Grey's Avatar
Victor Grey Victor Grey is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: East Tenn
Posts: 2,735
Thanks: 10,803
Thanked 3,906 Times in 1,604 Posts
Default

Price controls only lead to shortage. Then monopolies.

The only real way to curb inflation, is to stop printing new notes.
Old 06-06-2011, 03:07 PM
GuyFrost GuyFrost is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 61
Thanks: 60
Thanked 53 Times in 30 Posts
Default

Quote:
1. It appears almost every country, some countries twice, for a total of 32 defined instances of hyperinflation this century (33 if you go back another fifty years to the confederacy) all entered that condition, with the concurrent printing of money. What I noticed though, was not that they article says how much money was printed, but in almost every case, it mentions the denomination SIZE that was printed...
Printing a thousand one dollar bills or one one-thousand dollar bill have the same effect on the money supply. In the U.S., hyperinflation doesn't even require the printing of federal reserve notes at all. Due to the use of computers in banking, simply moving digital money around can increase the effective money supply. In addition, changing the requirements for fractional reserve banking could also increase the money supply.

Quote:
2. As a cure for hyperinflation, Israel, after seeing an increase in inflation, from a "meager" 13% in 1971, to 445% in 1984 for over a FACTOR of 34 increase (whereas American inflation doubles approximately every 20 years) instituted government mandated price freezes. Within a few months, inflation halved, and within a year, it was back down to 19%.
Israel is one of the few countries for whom this has worked. Making inflation illegal (freezing prices) usually does little to stop it, as does banning the use of foreign currencies. Zimbabwe tried both strategies but failed.

Quote:
3. Robert Mugabe, Zimbabwe, 1998... instituted a program that took farmland and equipment from white farmers, and re-allocated it to black farmers... the result was a bunch of defunct farms, loss of revenue to the government from food exports, and the government having to print money to pay debts. Sounds similar to reparations or wealth redistribution...
In my opinion this had very little impact on Zimbabwe's situation (By 1998 inflation was at 48%). However, wealth redistribution does usually hurt the country economically. Welfare and other entitlements redistribute wealth from the productive (wealth generators, job creators, etc...) to the unproductive (nonworking), and having to sustain a permanent and growing underclass is a drag on economic growth.

Quote:
Could our country, or the EU, IMF, etc... see printing LARGER notes as a harbinger of doom, and rather than print larger notes, try to sneak it under the radar by printing massive quantities of smaller notes? Since hyperinflation tends to be driven by a loss of faith in a currency, where recipients try to exchange the currency for commodities as soon as they get it, before losing more value, would a governing body be able to suppress (even temporarily) the onset of hyperinflation, simply by not blundering into the previous trap of printing larger denominations?
In my opinion, this is unlikely. Governments suffering hyperinflation print larger notes out of necessity, not a desire to "sneak" inflation into being. When citizens require a crate full of $10 bills to buy bread, issuing $10,000 bills is necessary for ease of transaction. As I mentioned earlier, sneaking inflation is more likely to come about through digital printing or easing fractional reserve lending requirements. Allowing banks to lend $100 for every $1 held in deposit, for example, would increase the money supply tenfold over current conditions without a single bill being printed.

Quote:
The article on Israel did not specify if they printed more, or larger currencies, or if it was just runaway inflation. It seems that government action WAS able to reign in runaway inflation. I understand the dollar is a bit different, as it is the world reserve currency, but what would prevent actions of the government from getting it back under control? That of course, assuming the powers that be, don't actually want hyperinflation to occur, to justify joining into a one-world currency...
Israel reissued an entirely new currency, the new shekel, each of which was worth 1000 old shekel. Israel did reign in inflation, but Israel is a smaller country with high levels of modernization, urbanization, and infrastructure. In addition, everyone who held onto the old shekels had their life savings wiped out. Just because Israel didn't completely tank doesn't mean that their hyperinflation didn't cause widespread devastation.

...and a one-world currency? No governments will voluntarily cede control of their money supply (look at what happened to the euro). Instead bi-lateral trade agreements are more likely, whereby each country exchanges goods in local currencies. This eliminates the need for a world currency.

Quote:
Once hyperinflation starts, could it be stopped in America's case, by government price freezes, currency exchanges, etc... why or why not? I understand many of the countries listed, probably didn't carry the debt over a generation, that we generate in a year, so that may be a factor too.
Inflation is very hard to reign in, especially in a country the size of the U.S. Think about what would happen:

1.) Everyone receiving welfare checks, pensions, social security, food stamps, etc... would effectively start receiving nothing. Do you think they would sit around and starve or take (probably violent) action?
2.) Nobody would leave their money in banks where it would rapidly lose value. Runs on banks would cause them to close, or at best would empty their vaults and eliminate their ability to lend money.
3.) People would easily be able to pay back all their credit with worthless money, forcing all lenders to take a huge loss or constantly adjust their interest rates upward.
4.) People would seek safety in tangible items with intrinsic worth, such as cars, houses, food, precious metals, household necessities, etc... rather than invest.
5.) Those with substantial savings would lose everything.

Also, many people do not realize that inflation, like all rates, is exponential in nature. A 3.5% inflation rate seems small (rule of 70 means that this is a 20-year doubling time), but each year's 3.5% is larger than last year's, because it is 3.5% of an overall greater total. All exponential functions have the same graph, one that starts out at a slow crawl for a long time and rapidly shoots upward toward the right side of the graph. Thus, any inflating money supply which is inflating at a flat rate is ultimately doomed to hyperinflation as some point, as even 1% of a large enough number is large itself. Of course, inflation tends to accelerate as people lose faith in their money and the government reacts poorly (printing more money, rebasing currency, etc...).

So in short, I think that in the U.S. it would be impossible to reign in hyperinflation. Once it gets to that point (20-30%+ inflation), it is too late. The government can mess with a lot of things on paper, but it simply cannot control the behavior of the people in any meaningful way. Currencies are like commodities in that they react to supply and demand. If nobody wants the currency, or if there is too much of it, a loss of faith will result in it becoming worthless.

Quote:
One last question, regarding currency exchanges. Would coins be subject to those as well? For example, if America exchanges $1000 old dollars, for $1 new dollar, even if coins were the clad coins they are today, would they retain value under the new system? I've read some people arguing in favor of hording regular nickels, in the event we hit hyperinflation as they are worth more than the face value currently, but I don't see a few grams of copper and nickel, both valued by the pound, being worth much in a hyperinflation scenario, if the government does a currency exchange and declares these coins not legal tender.
Coins will always be safer than paper bills for a number of reasons. Usually governments do not reissue coinage due to the massive expense and the belief that citizens are only holding small amounts of coins. In the event of a currency collapse, the value of all money will be reduced to its intrinsic, rather than fiat, value. For paper currencies this is its value as paper (writing implement, cigarette paper, amount of BTUs produced when burned, etc...), which is generally very low (see German marks being used to wallpaper or heat houses). For coinage, this is the metal content of the coin. Among U.S. coinage, all nickels, pre-1982 cents, and all silver coins already have a metal value exceeding face value (in 1964 a quarter bought you a gallon of gas; today that same quarter will buy you a gallon of gas, although a 1965 quarter won't even buy a liter). In addition, current coinage also has a melt value, although it does not exceed its fiat value. If the dollar falls, all coins will become worth more, not due to demand, but because the dollar is becoming worthless by comparison.

Taking a pre-82 copper penny as an example, if the dollar inflates to worthlessness, the value of that penny will rise dramatically (in relation to the dollar, that is to say, not intrinsically but in dollar terms) because the copper inside of it will buy you many dollar bill-papers. Thus, even without a redenomination of currency, coinage will remain more valuable than paper money.

But what if there is a redenomination of currency? Those holding many coins may be unexpected beneficiaries of a large increase in buying power if the government decides reissuing all the coins in the nation would be too much trouble (coins have a much longer "lifespan" than paper bills, they may decide that a quarter will equal a quarter "new dollar" rather than having "new quarters" and "old quarters"; minting coins takes more money than minting bills because a 6 cent cost of production for a $100 bill is trivial, but the metal content and minting costs of a coin use up most of the value, or in the case of nickels, exceed the value). But even if coins are reissued, the old coinage will be able to buy new money using its melt value. This is why issuing millions of clad quarters hasn't devalued the pre-65 quarter, except as fiat.

Just my opinions...
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to GuyFrost For This Useful Post:
Old 06-06-2011, 03:44 PM
Meat Guy Meat Guy is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Midwest U.S.A.
Posts: 2,201
Thanks: 3,447
Thanked 2,277 Times in 1,142 Posts
Default

When we see prices increase like wheat has gone up about 2 1/2 times the price it was a yr. ago, it make a person wonder if the dollar is worth that much less than a yr. ago.

I've been to Peru several times and they had hyperinflation that knocked 3 zeros off the currency twice in a few yrs. The money that it would take to buy a new car wouldn't fill the car with gas several yrs. later. The workers wages would go up but there was always a lag. They had to spend the money as soon as they got it because it would buy less a few days later. The people I stayed with converted their money to the US dollar to deposit into their banks. It held its value. Other countries have had much higher inflation that Peru.
You have heard stories of people heating their house with paper currency.
People don't think that can happen here. I'm not convinced it won't.

For those that have the resources to invest, I think farm land and operations to produce human food will hold their value. Small business's that provide for peoples needs would also be good.

Prepping is always a good thing to do reguardless of what the economy and dollar do.
Old 06-06-2011, 04:28 PM
Xelera's Avatar
Xelera Xelera is offline
Senior Reactor Operator
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1,008
Thanks: 1,672
Thanked 1,787 Times in 622 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GuyFrost View Post
Coins will always be safer than paper bills for a number of reasons. Usually governments do not reissue coinage due to the massive expense and the belief that citizens are only holding small amounts of coins. Taking a pre-82 copper penny as an example, if the dollar inflates to worthlessness, the value of that penny will rise dramatically (in relation to the dollar, that is to say, not intrinsically but in dollar terms) because the copper inside of it will buy you many dollar bill-papers. Thus, even without a redenomination of currency, coinage will remain more valuable than paper money.

But what if there is a redenomination of currency? Those holding many coins may be unexpected beneficiaries of a large increase in buying power if the government decides reissuing all the coins in the nation would be too much trouble (coins have a much longer "lifespan" than paper bills, they may decide that a quarter will equal a quarter "new dollar" rather than having "new quarters" and "old quarters"; minting coins takes more money than minting bills because a 6 cent cost of production for a $100 bill is trivial, but the metal content and minting costs of a coin use up most of the value, or in the case of nickels, exceed the value). But even if coins are reissued, the old coinage will be able to buy new money using its melt value. This is why issuing millions of clad quarters hasn't devalued the pre-65 quarter, except as fiat.

Just my opinions...
Thanks, sort of the explanation I was looking for.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Meat Guy View Post
When we see prices increase like wheat has gone up about 2 1/2 times the price it was a yr. ago, it make a person wonder if the dollar is worth that much less than a yr. ago.
Aren't some things like wheat prices, affected by other factors? For example, Congress can regulate interstate commerce, and pay some farmers not to grow any wheat, and can set production limits for farmer, etc... That was the source of dispute in Wickard v Filburn in 1942.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wickard_v._Filburn

Also, gas prices, controlled by OPEC and other exporting countries, can affect delivery prices to stores, and minimum wage increases (like the 50% bump in May of 2007, shortly before everything went to pot) can also affect prices too.
Old 06-06-2011, 05:56 PM
bcvojak's Avatar
bcvojak bcvojak is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 303
Thanks: 122
Thanked 252 Times in 120 Posts
Default

The Following User Says Thank You to bcvojak For This Useful Post:
Old 06-06-2011, 06:46 PM
Sky1950's Avatar
Sky1950 Sky1950 is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Texas
Age: 64
Posts: 3,241
Thanks: 12,835
Thanked 7,170 Times in 2,283 Posts
Default

If the dollar is devalued, what happens to stock held in blue chip companies (companies that will never fail). for example, if I own 100 share of Exxon-Mobil @ $100/share and the dollar is dealued to 25% of it's prior value, does that 100 shares of stock rise to $400/share? I know that food stuffs will quadruple also, but does your initial worth on the stock remain just at a dollar with 25% of it's former value? I'm just trying to undersand how this will work. I know if you have that same $10,000 in a savings account, you are screwed. If Exxon-Mobil fails, then it is trully TEOTWAWKI.
Old 06-06-2011, 07:43 PM
Mortimer's Avatar
Mortimer Mortimer is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Kansas
Posts: 2,656
Thanks: 868
Thanked 3,458 Times in 1,408 Posts
Default

The Chinese Prime Minister merely needs to utter these three words: "Dump the dollar."

It will happen.
Old 06-06-2011, 08:26 PM
whofarted whofarted is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 593
Thanks: 1,061
Thanked 698 Times in 302 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sky1950 View Post
If the dollar is devalued, what happens to stock held in blue chip companies (companies that will never fail). for example, if I own 100 share of Exxon-Mobil @ $100/share and the dollar is dealued to 25% of it's prior value, does that 100 shares of stock rise to $400/share? I know that food stuffs will quadruple also, but does your initial worth on the stock remain just at a dollar with 25% of it's former value? I'm just trying to undersand how this will work. I know if you have that same $10,000 in a savings account, you are screwed. If Exxon-Mobil fails, then it is trully TEOTWAWKI.
As I understand it, you got it right. I think the stockmarket will skyrocket as things get worse. Counter intuative but the dollar amount per share will go up as the dollar goes down (think silver/gold not worth more, dollar worth less) so many people will be fooled as the pinheaded media/politicians lie to us.
Old 06-06-2011, 08:48 PM
Sky1950's Avatar
Sky1950 Sky1950 is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Texas
Age: 64
Posts: 3,241
Thanks: 12,835
Thanked 7,170 Times in 2,283 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by whofarted View Post
As I understand it, you got it right. I think the stockmarket will skyrocket as things get worse. Counter intuative but the dollar amount per share will go up as the dollar goes down (think silver/gold not worth more, dollar worth less) so many people will be fooled as the pinheaded media/politicians lie to us.
Thanks, Then the people who will really be screwed to the wall is those who are working because there salaries will darn sure not quadruple and many companies will fold as a result, so many in the market will be skewered also

But those who are invested in secure international corporation stock and/or PMs should be able to weather the storm, . I'm willing to bet the national blue chips will not fold, even though their profits shrink. Of course what good will that be if the entire country sinks into anarchy. Just trying to figure it all out.

Gawd I wish I understood all this better LOL
Old 06-06-2011, 08:50 PM
nbforrest nbforrest is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 1,069
Thanks: 850
Thanked 1,287 Times in 563 Posts
Default

Frost, good job brother, spot on.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to nbforrest For This Useful Post:
Old 06-06-2011, 08:50 PM
N.GA11bScoutsOut! N.GA11bScoutsOut! is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 94
Thanks: 42
Thanked 70 Times in 36 Posts
Default

Interesting thread. Thx guys.
Old 06-06-2011, 09:26 PM
Aldo99 Aldo99 is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 350
Thanks: 139
Thanked 317 Times in 163 Posts
Default

I am a broken record, but for the best discussion I have read anywhere, go to FOFOA's blog and look specifically for his writings on hyperinflation. A month or two ago, one of the most staunch deflationist writer/gurus PUBLICLY on his own blog admitted to being converted by reading FOFOA's material. He provides a compelling case that hyperinflation is not an "IF" but a "WHEN" at this point...simply unavoidable. How to conserve your accumulated wealth is the majority of what he has been writing about for 3 yrs. Read and learn...PLEASE!
Old 06-06-2011, 09:59 PM
GuyFrost GuyFrost is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 61
Thanks: 60
Thanked 53 Times in 30 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sky1950 View Post
If the dollar is devalued, what happens to stock held in blue chip companies (companies that will never fail). for example, if I own 100 share of Exxon-Mobil @ $100/share and the dollar is dealued to 25% of it's prior value, does that 100 shares of stock rise to $400/share? I know that food stuffs will quadruple also, but does your initial worth on the stock remain just at a dollar with 25% of it's former value? I'm just trying to undersand how this will work. I know if you have that same $10,000 in a savings account, you are screwed. If Exxon-Mobil fails, then it is trully TEOTWAWKI.
Yes, you are correct. Stock shares, being intrinsically valuable as partial ownership of a company, are as immune to inflation as televisions, precious metals, and toilet paper are. Unlike savings accounts, which are literally holdings of money, stock shares are an object which is valued relatively to the dollar. If the dollar falls, but the value of the stock doesn't, then the nominal price of each share of stock will rise proportionally to inflation.

However, stock isn't truly safe, as businesses are harmed by inflation (ie. businesses operating in the country in question). There are numerous factors involved, such as menu costs (the cost of changing prices - ie. cost of printing new menus, analyzing pricing trends, re-barcoding/pricetagging everything in a store, etc...), the costs of increasing wages, and a loss of all cash holdings, which in large corporations can be significant. Therefore, stocks are very likely to fall in value somewhat during inflation, as during all economic stresses. However, stocks are definitely safer than savings accounts.

Probably the best store of wealth for times of inflation is actual stuff. A gun will always be worth whatever value that gun is worth, regardless of its price. Precious metals are often seen as especially good stores of wealth because they are extremely compact for their value, and are fungible (one ounce of gold is the same as any other ounce), unlike televisions.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to GuyFrost For This Useful Post:
Old 06-06-2011, 10:34 PM
whofarted whofarted is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 593
Thanks: 1,061
Thanked 698 Times in 302 Posts
Default

The only other factor is governing types. If we move to socialism & property rights are lost then pretty much all bets are off & you own nothing.
Old 06-06-2011, 11:11 PM
nbforrest nbforrest is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 1,069
Thanks: 850
Thanked 1,287 Times in 563 Posts
Default

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2...ery-challenges
Reply

Bookmarks



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
hyperinflation anyone? chrishoo84 Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 3 03-01-2011 09:15 AM
Hyperinflation at 2% per day Mule Skinner Financial Forum 5 10-05-2010 08:11 AM
Hyperinflation: What will it look like Cheapsuits Financial Forum 14 08-29-2010 07:49 PM
Survivalist Forum > General Discussion Section > General Discussion dragonmisty British Isles and ROI 6 01-23-2010 08:16 AM
Hyperinflation soon! Mullenite General Discussion 24 10-23-2008 10:40 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright Kevin Felts 2006 - 2012,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net