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Old 05-12-2011, 12:57 PM
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Default homemade flour mill



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I appoligize up front if someone has already posted this.

I'm looking for plans to make a homemade mill to grind wheat into flour. Anyone have this or ideas on how to make this. I'm not looking at anything fancy, just to get the job done with the least effort.

Thanks
Old 05-12-2011, 01:17 PM
KCChimneyman KCChimneyman is offline
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I didn't make mine myself but I bought one from the Amish community nearby, I know you can buy some grain mills other places but these have the stones to grind the grain not metal.
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Old 05-12-2011, 02:51 PM
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In a pinch you can sprout the grain (slightly -- not necessary to see full sprouting) and then it will grind in a standard meat grinder. This is the "Essene Bread" or sprouted grain bread you can find at whole food markets. Very sweet and tasty.

Not what you asked but a way to get by without a standard grain mill.

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/essene-bread/Detail.aspx
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Old 05-14-2011, 08:17 AM
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in balkans where i come from most usual traditional way of grinding grain is with small water mills:
http://img248.imageshack.us/img248/4283/vodenicazs1.jpg
http://www.e-vozila.com/slike_forum/Vodenica3.jpg
http://www.imotski.net/wp-content/up.../02/mlinic.jpg
i dont know much abou construction of them but im sure biggest problem would be getting their most important parts - two big stones shapped like wheels that actualy do the grinding:
http://img207.imageshack.us/img207/1922/vodenica.jpg
since i will probably have to make water mill by my own in few years, i have idea of just picking them from river beds, left there after old mills collapsed and rottened...they are pretty heavy, but since in wheel shape can be rolled........
also consulting old people with some construction experience in water mill construction could be worth of trying.......
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Old 05-14-2011, 08:22 AM
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forgot some images of stones:
http://img207.imageshack.us/img207/1922/vodenica.jpg
http://217.26.67.168/uploads/2/5/253...%202009-11.jpg
one on top is spinning and one down is static, that makes grinding, grain comes through the hole in the middle .....
Old 10-04-2011, 09:02 AM
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There has to be an even simpler way to do this. I was watching a PBS special about how the US helped the USSR in 1921...well mainly helped ordinary people who were STARVING TO DEATH due to the harsh policies of the ignorant Bolshevik government there. We sent TONS of grain to MILLIONS of people and most survivors who did get grain ground it up with simple peasant mills. I saw some video clips in that program where little old babushki ground up the grain with homemade mills that weren't much more than two large "wheels" made from large circular cuts of a tree stump. One slab on top of the other. There was a hole in the center of the first wheel and she dumped the dry corn grain in there and spun away while flour began to come out of the sides between the two wheels. But they weren't metal or stone....just very hard WOOD. Any ideas or thoughts on this?

In Russia, simple people made simple and straightforward tools from simple and cheap materials that worked. Minimal parts. If I can get a clip from this and post it here, I will. Any thoughts on this are appreciated!
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Old 10-04-2011, 09:59 AM
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Ok, here's what I was talking about. A simple hand mill made of two wooden grinding wheels.



Grain is poored into hole in top center wheel.



Simple hand crank used in rotating motion.



Grain falls down through center hole as wheel is cranked.



Flour begins to emerge from between the two wooden wheels all around.



Flour falls down sides of bottom wheel where it is collected. In this case, a cloth has been placed below the mill to gather the flour.



Grandma keeps grinding until she has enough flour and collects the grain from the cloth or uses the cloth as a sack to transport the flour.



This essentially shows that ANYONE using very simple materials as you see here, could make a household mill with very SIMPLE CHEAP materials. The question is how to you link the two wheels together with the hole on top properly. It seems very simple, but the internal details elude me. Comments on this would be greatly appreciated!

Cheers.
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Old 10-04-2011, 11:21 AM
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A guy would essentially just figure out how the axle system works, or if there even is one and your in business.
Old 10-04-2011, 11:21 AM
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Some videos I found on this:



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Old 10-05-2011, 09:46 AM
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1.Lower disk roughed up
2. A circle drawn in the middle of the lower disk, just one millimeter smaller in diameter than the hole in the middle of the top disk
3. longish nails driven into the drawn circle, maybe 6 to ten nails
4. some thin metal pipe the length of the driven nail, slipped over the nails
5. a vertical handle secured to the top of the upper disk
6. upper disk slid over the circle made by the nails
7. drop grain through hole in upper disk?

I don't know if that would work or not, you could try it with a practice bit of wood?
Old 10-05-2011, 09:53 AM
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Last edited by PaulapForbes; 10-05-2011 at 09:54 AM.. Reason: added another link
Old 10-05-2011, 03:59 PM
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The simplest way and probably cheapest way so far that I found

http://www.preppers.info/uploads/Foo...Grain_Mill.pdf
Old 10-10-2011, 09:12 AM
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I bought both my hand crank grain mill and meat grinder from a amish type store. Both are still in the box. I'm gonna mount them both on the table. If you get them make sure they has as many Stainless Steel parts on them as possible.
Old 10-11-2011, 06:59 AM
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The simplest technique possible is perhaps mano and matate.



If you have access to a river, perhaps this might be something for you.



But honestly, I am very happy to have a Country Living grain mill complete with spare parts for a lifetime or two! There is a reason why sophisticated mechanical mills came into being.
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