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View Poll Results: Do you use Desiccant Silica gel in your food stores?
Yes, I do use or plan on useing desiccant silica gel in my food stores 7 50.00%
No, there is no reason to use it. O2 absorbers are enough. 7 50.00%
Voters: 14. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-22-2008, 08:40 PM
LaRue LaRue is offline
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Default Desiccant Silica Gel packs & food storeage



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I am just now starting my long term food stores. I bought 20# of long grain rice and I have a 5gal. pickle bucket that I have cleaned (dish soap/ bleach water soaking for 3 days/ dish soap/ sun dry). I want this to last a really, really long time so I ordered some O2 absorbers and some desiccant silica gel packs to put in with the rice.

My question is; does anyone else use the silica in their food stores? Is it a good idea or bad one? Anything I need to be careful of when using these with food products?

I understand it bad to ingest, but I plan on leaving in its packet and wraping in a coffee filter so it does not come in direct contact with the food.

Last edited by LaRue; 06-22-2008 at 08:44 PM.. Reason: spelling
Old 06-22-2008, 09:04 PM
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I found this link that might be helpful:
http://www.erowid.org/psychoactives/...storage2.shtml

The best of the best would be nitrogen, but I don't know if you can get that for home use.
Old 06-22-2008, 09:28 PM
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Just a suggestion but don't just fill the bucket with rice. What has worked well for me is to put the rice in small ziplocks that have had the air vacuumed out with a shop vac and fill the bucket with these individually wrapped "servings". Since there will always be some air leakage (over time) into the ziplocks, a dessicant pack is tossed in the bucket to take the moisture out of the air that is sealed in the bucket. An oxygen absorber can also be added to reduce the oxygen levels. Since the food is separated in ziplocks you don't have to worry about contact with O2 absorbers or dessicant.

I voted for dessicant as it seems to me that it is more important to have a bone dry atmosphere. However, why not also toss in an oxygen absorber? Cheap insurance. Some of my rice is over 30 years old (cache) and it was still great after being tested 2 years ago.
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Old 06-22-2008, 09:35 PM
LaRue LaRue is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HikerDad View Post
I found this link that might be helpful:
http://www.erowid.org/psychoactives/...storage2.shtml

The best of the best would be nitrogen, but I don't know if you can get that for home use.
Thank you, the site gave me a really good idea. I decided to order 1 large can of Silica gel (a 1 liter can) instead of the smaller packets, for cost savings and future use. My delima was how to store so it does not come into contact with the food and the website you posted solved the problem for me.

I have some small baby food jars that my wife and I decided to keep and re-use when making fresh veggie baby food.

I will use one of those jars and fill it with silica gel. Then I will punch several holes in the lid and tightly secure it to the jar. Then I will take a coffee filter and rubber band it over the top of the jar. Place the baby food jar in the bottom of the bucket and fill it with rice. That way no rice comes in contact with the gel and all should be good for consumption.

thanks for the link.

Last edited by LaRue; 06-22-2008 at 09:36 PM.. Reason: spelling
Old 06-22-2008, 09:39 PM
LaRue LaRue is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scruggs View Post
Just a suggestion but don't just fill the bucket with rice. What has worked well for me is to put the rice in small ziplocks that have had the air vacuumed out with a shop vac and fill the bucket with these individually wrapped "servings". Since there will always be some air leakage (over time) into the ziplocks, a dessicant pack is tossed in the bucket to take the moisture out of the air that is sealed in the bucket. An oxygen absorber can also be added to reduce the oxygen levels. Since the food is separated in ziplocks you don't have to worry about contact with O2 absorbers or dessicant.

I voted for dessicant as it seems to me that it is more important to have a bone dry atmosphere. However, why not also toss in an oxygen absorber? Cheap insurance. Some of my rice is over 30 years old (cache) and it was still great after being tested 2 years ago.
Yes, I have also ordered O2 absorbers as well, I just assumed that it was a "given" to use them with any long term storage plans. I have a 200 count of 500cc absorbers on the way.

I like the ziplock bag idea as well, I will probably do that. Thank you
Old 06-22-2008, 09:51 PM
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I did some of my rice/beans/flour/sugar/salt in big mylar bags with 02 absorbers to fill the whole bucket. But i also did some smaller bags of each with 02 absorbers vac sealed in small 1lb packs so I dont have to break into the big buckets untill things get REALLY bad... Or if the wife runs out of something and needs a little of something to get by for the weekened, then I can replace it... Just my 2 cents.
Old 06-23-2008, 02:41 AM
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Save your humidity absorbers for your Guns and Garden seeds.
Old 01-06-2010, 06:23 PM
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The Silica desiccant that we use is not a gel.

They are tiny cunks like salt or sugar.

10% of them turn red to tell you that they have completely saturated with moisture.
10% of them turn blue to tell you that they are completely dry.

It works great!

Much better than O2 absorbers.

And it is re-usable.

Old 01-06-2010, 07:44 PM
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If you are going to store foods in non-permeable containers (Mylar, glass, or metal), for long term storage, you need to prevent oxidation by displacing or absorbing the oxygen, as well as, keep it dry and cool. Dehydrated dairy products (cheese powder, cocoa powder, powder eggs, butter/margarine powder, and whey powder) generally store less time because of fat content. If stored dry in hermetically sealed containers with the oxygen removed they will store approximately 5 years. If stored at a stable temperature of 65degrees F. they may enable to them store up to 10 years.
Instant and regular milks that are non fat will store 20 years.
Dry is necessary for any food storage but oxygen must be removed to prevent fats from going rancid and vitamins *& flavoides from being ruined by oxidation.
Old 01-06-2010, 08:55 PM
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Grains, beans, flour, sugar, salt do not really have problems with O2, only moisture.
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