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Old 04-06-2011, 11:57 AM
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Default Repackaging a 50 pound bag of powdered eggs



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Honeyville have these 50 lb boxes of whole eggs for 200$. That figures to be 2000 eggs at 10 cents each, if my math is correct.

As packaged they only have a 12 month expire date. How long do you figure they would last if I packaged them up into Mylar with oxygen absorber ?

thanks BIH


http://store.honeyvillegrain.com/pow...eeggs50lb.aspx
Old 04-06-2011, 12:13 PM
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From your link: "This product may be stored for up to 12 months opened, and 5 to 10 years in airtight sealed cans."
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Old 04-06-2011, 12:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Allamakee County View Post
From your link: "This product may be stored for up to 12 months opened, and 5 to 10 years in airtight sealed cans."
Missed the 5-10 year part. I plan on opening and using some. So by repacking I should get at least 5 out of it. Seems like a good deal. Fresh eggs are not much cheaper.

Thx
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Old 04-06-2011, 01:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigislandhikers View Post
Honeyville have these 50 lb boxes of whole eggs for 200$. That figures to be 2000 eggs at 10 cents each, if my math is correct.

As packaged they only have a 12 month expire date. How long do you figure they would last if I packaged them up into Mylar with oxygen absorber ?

thanks BIH


http://store.honeyvillegrain.com/pow...eeggs50lb.aspx
Same lifespan as the prepackaged eggs the food storage companies sell. Many years. Powdered eggs are real stable when packed properly. I'm using up some that have been stored in a hot metal shed since the late '90s and they're still fine. They were packed in #10 cans with O2 absorber.

But check around first. You can almost always beat Honeyville's price if you do a little browsing. A lot of places sell eggs in bulk, as well as other products.
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Old 04-06-2011, 03:02 PM
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Same lifespan as the prepackaged eggs the food storage companies sell. Many years. Powdered eggs are real stable when packed properly. I'm using up some that have been stored in a hot metal shed since the late '90s and they're still fine. They were packed in #10 cans with O2 absorber.

But check around first. You can almost always beat Honeyville's price if you do a little browsing. A lot of places sell eggs in bulk, as well as other products.
I must be looking In the wrong places. This is the best price I have been able to find.
Old 04-10-2011, 01:13 AM
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50 pounds $400
https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/f...rated_eggs.htm

$300
http://www.eggstore.com/whole-egg-50lb-b50.html

$319
http://waltonfeed.com/product/705

That's a few and they all require shipping costs. Isn't Honeyville a flat $4.95 or something?
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Old 04-22-2011, 11:51 AM
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50 pounds $400
https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/f...rated_eggs.htm

$300
http://www.eggstore.com/whole-egg-50lb-b50.html

$319
http://waltonfeed.com/product/705

That's a few and they all require shipping costs. Isn't Honeyville a flat $4.95 or something?

Yes just $4.95 for shipping. I have a 10% coupon so I think I will be ordering.

Has anyone tried their eggs?

BIH
Old 04-22-2011, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by bigislandhikers View Post
Yes just $4.95 for shipping. I have a 10% coupon so I think I will be ordering.

Has anyone tried their eggs?

BIH
I have. They are great for baking. OK for scrambled.

I stored mine in 1/2 gallon mason jars. If I had to do it again I would use Mylar bags.
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Old 02-08-2017, 10:29 PM
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I have. They are great for baking. OK for scrambled.

I stored mine in 1/2 gallon mason jars. If I had to do it again I would use Mylar bags.
Can you explain why you'd go with Mylar over the 1/2 gallon jars?

Anyone check the prices on these eggs lately?
http://shop.honeyville.com/powdered-...eggs-50lb.html
Old 02-08-2017, 10:51 PM
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These guys still have 50lbs of eggs for 200 dollars plus 40 some for shipping

http://rainydayfoods.com/whole-eggs-50lb.html
Old 02-09-2017, 12:08 AM
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I can get "kosher certified" powdered whole eggs for $175 /50lb box. Did some work for the factory that makes the stuff..

I'm still wondering why the 1/2 gallon jars didn't work out..
Old 02-09-2017, 08:20 AM
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Can you explain why you'd go with Mylar over the 1/2 gallon jars?
Glass jars allow in light, are heavy & relatively fragile.

Mylar doesn't allow in light, is lightweight & if you drop a bag, it doesn't shatter like glass.

Simple as that.
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Old 02-09-2017, 09:12 AM
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Originally Posted by bunkerbuster View Post
Glass jars allow in light, are heavy & relatively fragile.

Mylar doesn't allow in light, is lightweight & if you drop a bag, it doesn't shatter like glass.

Simple as that.
Thank you!
I was wondering if it was something to do with the actual packaging process or using them later.

I think jars have some advantages over Mylar.. they're infinitely reusable, rodent proof, cheaper, and I think that applying heavy vacuum w/oxy absorber will keep the food better for longer.

The problem is that they are heavy and they can break.
Old 02-09-2017, 09:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Murby View Post
Thank you!
I was wondering if it was something to do with the actual packaging process or using them later.

I think jars have some advantages over Mylar.. they're infinitely reusable, rodent proof, cheaper, and I think that applying heavy vacuum w/oxy absorber will keep the food better for longer.

The problem is that they are heavy and they can break.
Jars are cheaper than Mylar? Am I missing something?

I guess since they're reusable maybe, but still. I'm a canner--jars are expensive
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Old 02-09-2017, 12:00 PM
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Jars are cheaper than Mylar? Am I missing something?

I guess since they're reusable maybe, but still. I'm a canner--jars are expensive
I guess it depends on the application. If one analyses the expense for a single event storing food, the Mylar is cheaper..

But on the second and third revolutions, the jars are cheaper.. and if you're like us, where we constantly rotate our stock and use it, we have some jars that have been cycled a dozen times..

Also, and I understand this doesn't apply to most others but it does to me.. I picked up over 800 free jars including pints, quarts and 1/2 gallon types so all I have to do is pay for the lids. We don't even store jars with rings on them as its not required.. the only time the rings are on the jars is when they're in the pressure canner.

I'm about to pack up a bunch of pasta for a long sleep.. it probably won't get rotated with normal stock for the next five to seven years so I'll probably use the Mylar bags for that.
Old 02-09-2017, 08:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Murby View Post
Thank you!
I was wondering if it was something to do with the actual packaging process or using them later.

I think jars have some advantages over Mylar.. they're infinitely reusable, rodent proof, cheaper, and I think that applying heavy vacuum w/oxy absorber will keep the food better for longer.

The problem is that they are heavy and they can break.
Do not vacuum a jar/bag that you put an O2A in.

There is no redundancy and you might keep the O2A from catalyzing in the first place. A catalytic reaction requires certain elements in certain amounts to be present for the reaction to start. Removing most of the air might drop the oxygen level too low, but enough will remain to keep damaging foods.

Fact is that the number one method to preserve unused O2A's from an opened pack is to put them into a vacuumed jar. If that works to keep them from reacting then why are they going to work in another container you also vacuumed down.

Vacuuming and LTS dry food are not compatible anyway. No LTS dry food company uses vacuuming as part of their packing scheme. It's for short term use only in place of using O2A's.

Put an O2A in and call the job done. Don't try to overthink it. It works just fine all by itself without help.
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Old 02-10-2017, 01:31 PM
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I want to refute some of your statements here as being incorrect. Let me first say that while I am an engineer with 30 years of experience designing industrial processing equipment (some of it in the food industry), I'm not really that sharp with chemistry or biology.. That said, your statements didn't seem logical but I wasn't experienced enough with this issue to refute them with absolute certainty.

Quote:
Originally Posted by IamZeke View Post
Do not vacuum a jar/bag that you put an O2A in.

There is no redundancy and you might keep the O2A from catalyzing in the first place. A catalytic reaction requires certain elements in certain amounts to be present for the reaction to start. Removing most of the air might drop the oxygen level too low, but enough will remain to keep damaging foods.
This is incorrect.. Contrary to popular belief, Iron can rust in a vacuum so long as oxygen is present for it to react with. Certain other elements do speed the reaction but we're not worried about speed, as much as we are the final levels.

Since chemistry isn't my strong suit, I decided to go right to the horse's mouth and call sorbentsystems.com
http://www.sorbentsystems.com/contact.html

A 30 second conversation with their engineer confirmed what I thought.. Adding a vacuum will drastically decrease the size of O2A required and make them last longer. Vacuum has such a wonderful way of preserving things..

Quote:
Fact is that the number one method to preserve unused O2A's from an opened pack is to put them into a vacuumed jar. If that works to keep them from reacting then why are they going to work in another container you also vacuumed down.
Its not about "keeping them from reacting".. its about how much reaction they will undergo.. Oxygen absorbers will react with oxygen.. the more oxygen you remove, the longer they will keep reacting if any oxygen shows up.

Quote:
Vacuuming and LTS dry food are not compatible anyway. No LTS dry food company uses vacuuming as part of their packing scheme. It's for short term use only in place of using O2A's.
Yes, but my guess is that the compatibility issue isn't about chemistry as much as it is about money...
Old 02-10-2017, 02:50 PM
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There is an egg processing plant located where I live so I stopped in to speak with the head of the lab and when I mentioned storing whole egg powder, her first question was "what is the moisture content". I said "not sure" so she started spitting out information that only a chemist would understand. Her bottom line answer was that if it is dried down to a lower moisture, packaged in mylar with an OA it would probably store well for 5 years in a cool, dry area. If stored at higher temps maybe 3 years. I think she was being conservative with storage times. When I see her again I will have more specific questions to ask.
Old 02-10-2017, 03:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Murby View Post
I want to refute some of your statements here as being incorrect. Let me first say that while I am an engineer with 30 years of experience designing industrial processing equipment (some of it in the food industry), I'm not really that sharp with chemistry or biology.. That said, your statements didn't seem logical but I wasn't experienced enough with this issue to refute them with absolute certainty.


This is incorrect.. Contrary to popular belief, Iron can rust in a vacuum so long as oxygen is present for it to react with. Certain other elements do speed the reaction but we're not worried about speed, as much as we are the final levels.

Since chemistry isn't my strong suit, I decided to go right to the horse's mouth and call sorbentsystems.com
http://www.sorbentsystems.com/contact.html

A 30 second conversation with their engineer confirmed what I thought.. Adding a vacuum will drastically decrease the size of O2A required and make them last longer. Vacuum has such a wonderful way of preserving things..


Its not about "keeping them from reacting".. its about how much reaction they will undergo.. Oxygen absorbers will react with oxygen.. the more oxygen you remove, the longer they will keep reacting if any oxygen shows up.


Yes, but my guess is that the compatibility issue isn't about chemistry as much as it is about money...
I went through the same questions with all the O2A suppliers years ago.

They were a mixed bag across the board. Some declared it one way and others the other way. Just keep asking different makers and distributors long enough and you will realize that "asking the sellers" is a waste of time. Be my guest and check if you disbelieve.

But then I also understand about both vacuuming and corrosion on a professional level. Iron corrosion isn't simply linear or binary. It requires three elements, not two. Iron, oxidizer, and moisture. With 3 elements needed you require a catalyst reaction. It's why certain iron O2A's come with a moisture disbursal option and others don't, one for humid and one for arid environments. Without moisture the iron won't corrode properly. And by proving it requires an element in certain proportions, you prove that it is like that for all three elements. It can't apply to only one element, or you wouldn't need the element in the reaction. That's sophomore grade college chemistry there.

The only O2A type that would work in a linear and binary fashion would be the ascorbic acid based O2A's. Sorbent Systems sells those too and in great quantity to pharmaceutical companies, though only by special order to consumers. Did SS explain the difference there? They should have.

Btw, Sorbent Systems isn't a manufacturer. They are just a big time distributor, like ULine. The big ferrous based O2A makers don't sell directly to the public. They aren't going to have a bunch of O2A manufacturing experts there. Look at their product lines. A million kinds of bags, vacuum sealing machinery, multiple chemical and testing product lines, gauges and sintering.

No company does all that. Google map their address and see that there is absolutely no way they have the manufacturing lines needed to make all those completely varied products inside that grocery store sized building. They would need a dozen buildings like that.

If you are an industrial PE like I am then you can imagine what you can stuff into a building that size.

And you know that makers of bulk low value items like that rarely sell directly to the public.

You are talking to a stocking distributor. That's "downstream" from the horse's mouth, if you get my drift. It's likely that they use the term engineer very loosely. Sales companies do that. I've been a sales engineer on a staff of a half dozen where I was actually the only licensed PE in the bunch, and some didn't even have a science degree, much less an engineering one. There are no professional societies or standards to be a "sales engineer". It's just a title given by management to those experienced in application of a company's product lines.
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Old 02-10-2017, 03:52 PM
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There is an egg processing plant located where I live so I stopped in to speak with the head of the lab and when I mentioned storing whole egg powder, her first question was "what is the moisture content". I said "not sure" so she started spitting out information that only a chemist would understand. Her bottom line answer was that if it is dried down to a lower moisture, packaged in mylar with an OA it would probably store well for 5 years in a cool, dry area. If stored at higher temps maybe 3 years. I think she was being conservative with storage times. When I see her again I will have more specific questions to ask.
My eggs have an upper moisture limit of 4% and we store under deep vacuum.. Food saver machines go down to 18 to 19 inches max.. (reference youtube video) but we use a rotary vane pump to pull the jars down to 27.5.

We also store our food in the basement where summer temps are usually around 65 degrees and winter temps down there are around 45.

I'm expecting 10 years.. I have to wonder if I'm being optimistic?
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