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Old 04-03-2011, 04:24 PM
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Default Food for long term caching.



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OK... Before anyone says store what you eat, eat what you store and rotate, this is not a post about food storage at home.

I'm thinking about burying a cache of supplies way out in the boonies, and will probably not want to go back to it until the time I need it.

On that basis... does anyone have any suggestions for food supplies that will store for many many years. I will be using PVC capped and sealed burial tubes.

So far I'm thinking about storing the following items sealed in mylar with oxygen absorbers.

Whole wheat
Rice
Pemmican (Home made).
Jar of Honey
Salt

Any other Suggestions?
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Old 04-03-2011, 04:31 PM
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A couple things come to mind.
Beens, Lentals, & rolled Oats for a start. All sealed with O2 w/absorbers.
I would also include a pot/pan and some fire starting material ie. Mag block.
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Old 04-03-2011, 08:33 PM
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You can also put in some regular sugar. It keeps well. I suppose you are determining how many people will be supplied from this cache and for how long. Most food storage plans that I've read include some type of oil, but oils usually don't keep as long as the other items you plan to store. You might do some research: dehydrated peanut butter may be a consideration. At any rate, you have a good plan......
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Old 04-03-2011, 08:36 PM
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Macaroni, spaghetti or pasta shells?
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Old 04-03-2011, 09:00 PM
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Instant mashed potatoes, White rice, Pinto Beans, Macaroni Noodles, Oats, salt, Sugar, Spam or Armour Treat, Saltine Crackers, White Beans, Canned Chicken or Ham, Honey, Wheat Berries, Hot Sauce, something to start fire with and something to cook in.
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Old 04-03-2011, 09:42 PM
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I doubt your pemmican will make it. Fats tend to go rancid in most storage conditions. Oddly enough, canned fats don't seem to be plagued with that problem, though I don't understand what the difference is. Perhaps dissolved oxygen permeating the non canned fats?

Anyway, your idea of basics wheat, rice, honey and such are good. You might also add some of the smaller, faster cooking beans such as split peas and/or lentils. When combined with the grains, they form a complete protein.
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Old 04-04-2011, 03:55 AM
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I decided on the pemmican based on claims that it would last for as long as 80 years, although I must admit that I have no way to verify these caims. Does anyone have any experience of storing Pemmican?

One possible item of Fat for long term storage is canned Ghee... I've had cans opened over 5 years after the best before date and they've been as good as new.
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Old 04-04-2011, 04:48 AM
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I have had the same thought going on in my mind about the wilderness cache.

Will you be buying the tubes, or constructing them yourself?
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Old 04-04-2011, 08:31 AM
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Well... Given the insane price of screw on end caps and the fact that I would like to put quite a few of these caches together and bury them at strategic locations on my bug out route. I'm considering sealing the ends of 6" PVC pipe with fibreglass resin. I can get pretty good deals on the stuff from a boat repair company, so should be able to load up a bunch of them without costing the earth. I'll need to hide a junior hacksaw with each cache to get into them.
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Old 04-04-2011, 10:19 AM
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One thing to consider when placing caches like this is the moisture in the ground. If you put a sealed container in the ground and the water table/moisture is sufficient, it will float the tubes out of the ground. This happens with swimming pools, septic tanks, and other underground storage when they are not full.

Be sure to fill the tubes to the maximum so they will less likely to "float". You might even consider filling the void spaces with some type of ballast.
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Old 04-04-2011, 11:05 AM
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I've heard that you can use food buckets from the chinese takeout or doughnut shop. seal the top with silicone before burial. I understand they are a bear to reopen after sealed. Also, you can order #10 cans of rice, beans, oats, and wheat from the Mormons (LDS) that will last for years. I think they still include free shipping. http://store.lds.org/
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Old 04-04-2011, 11:31 AM
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My preps started with breakfast, since it would set the pace for the rest of the day

Instant pancake mix, dried potatoes (for harsh browns) and powdered eggs- just add water, sealed in mylar bags and oxygen absorbers.

Lunch and dinner - Rice, beans (pinto beans for protein), potato flakes, oatmeal, pasta,,,,,,, and so on.

Honey is always good
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Old 04-04-2011, 11:44 AM
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Seeds for growing sprouts and a sprouting jar lid like this.
http://www.amazon.com/Handy-Pantry-S...pd_sim_misc_10
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Old 04-04-2011, 04:18 PM
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Some great ideas there, thanks guys and gals.... :-)
Old 01-15-2012, 03:40 PM
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dry beans, coffee, and toilet paper
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Old 01-15-2012, 03:54 PM
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Default Economical Alternative

Quote:
Originally Posted by valkyrie10 View Post
Well... Given the insane price of screw on end caps and the fact that I would like to put quite a few of these caches together and bury them at strategic locations on my bug out route. I'm considering sealing the ends of 6" PVC pipe with fibreglass resin. I can get pretty good deals on the stuff from a boat repair company, so should be able to load up a bunch of them without costing the earth. I'll need to hide a junior hacksaw with each cache to get into them.

An economical alternative, to more expensive end caps, are "test caps" .... temporary plastic end caps for pressure testing water lines .... not near as durable - but they'll do the job ..... eazy open for when the time comes
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Old 01-15-2012, 03:55 PM
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FYI,

The orange "Homer" buckets Home Depot sells for 3.69 are HDPE2 (food grade) as are the gasketed lids. I order dessicant packets and oxygen absorbers from eBay, throw them in with whatever I am packing, and so far I haven't had any loss of vacuum. Just a cheap solution versus food-grade containers with gamma lids.


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Old 01-15-2012, 04:00 PM
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If it is to be cached and the purpose is to serve as a backup emergency cache, not normal long term food at your BOL, then I recommend Mountain House freeze dried backpacking pouch meals for the following reasons:

1) These will store a lot longer than any other food - at least twice as long, possibly as much ten times as long.

2) They are already packaged securely - no worries about mistakes in this regard, and you can't afford mistakes in an emergency cache unless you never actually use it.

3) They are lightweight - weight will matter a lot if you are on foot, and you probably will be if you need to dig up a cache.

4) The food is easily prepared - just add water, it usually doesn't even need to be hot water (but for most meals that is better). Some food pouches can even be eaten as is without adding water (although you will want to drink water with it).
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Old 01-15-2012, 04:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostPepper5K View Post
FYI,

The orange "Homer" buckets Home Depot sells for 3.69 are HDPE2 (food grade) as are the gasketed lids. I order dessicant packets and oxygen absorbers from eBay, throw them in with whatever I am packing, and so far I haven't had any loss of vacuum. Just a cheap solution versus food-grade containers with gamma lids.


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Preparedness is a process, not an event.
Are they for sure food grade? Do they say so on the bucket like Lowe's Encore buckets do? Just because they're HDPE2 doesn't mean they're food grade. And without the mylar, O2 will get back into the bucket. The plastic that it's made from is not a gas barrier. So O2 can actually pass through the plastic of the bucket itself. This is why all the long term food storage companies pack it in mylar with O2 absorber (no dessicant...requires special packing for them to work together) and then use the bucket to protect the mylar.

As I keep saying, if you want to guarantee yourself that you're packing your foods properly. Then do it the way the long term food storage companies are doing it. They have decades of experience and laboratory tests to prove that their methods work. There are a whole of of "it seems like it should work" methods that don't. And food is too important to take chances on something that "seems like it should work."
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Old 01-15-2012, 04:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Heretic View Post
If it is to be cached and the purpose is to serve as a backup emergency cache, not normal long term food at your BOL, then I recommend Mountain House freeze dried backpacking pouch meals for the following reasons:

1) These will store a lot longer than any other food - at least twice as long, possibly as much ten times as long.

2) They are already packaged securely - no worries about mistakes in this regard, and you can't afford mistakes in an emergency cache unless you never actually use it.

3) They are lightweight - weight will matter a lot if you are on foot, and you probably will be if you need to dig up a cache.

4) The food is easily prepared - just add water, it usually doesn't even need to be hot water (but for most meals that is better). Some food pouches can even be eaten as is without adding water (although you will want to drink water with it).
The MH meals in pouches are only rated for about 7 years. It's the products in #10 cans that can last for decades. Dehydrated foods last a very long time too and are a fraction of the cost, and more compact. But of course they require a bit more effort and time to rehydrate.
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