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Old 03-21-2011, 01:36 PM
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Default shelf life life of home canned foods



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does anyone know the shelf life of home processed foods such as meats, relishes, and vegetables?
Old 03-21-2011, 01:44 PM
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All depends on what your canning how your canning it and how you store it.

but most things store for a good while got some apple butter been in jar for 3 years and still as yummy as when canned
Old 03-22-2011, 08:47 AM
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Decades in many cases.
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Old 03-22-2011, 02:02 PM
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canned beef, chicken and pork in canning jars, does anyone know the shelf life for these items?

I don't want to have to open them and smell, and hope that they don't give my kids food poisoning,

I was wondering if anyone had any info to help me to determine just how long these foods, when properly pressure processed will store in ideal conditions
Old 03-22-2011, 02:05 PM
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Dinka-dink!

Does the lid pop up and down? If so it will make a noise, dinka-dink.

So long as the lid is held down tight, it indicates that the jar is still holding vacuum. No pathogens have grown in the jar, and it is safe.

Dinka-dink means it is dog food.

No sound means it is safe.
Old 03-22-2011, 02:07 PM
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Dinka-dink...lmao...that is great...and very true.....years on end if no dinka-dink...love it.
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Old 03-22-2011, 02:12 PM
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Dinka-Dink....ROTF but very effective.
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Old 03-22-2011, 02:26 PM
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I appreciate the whole dinka dink thing , and I get it...

But that's not really answering my question... so you're basically saying that canned goods NEVER go bad? sure they do!

That's why I was asking about shelf life of processed meats
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Old 03-22-2011, 02:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by perduepro View Post
canned beef, chicken and pork in canning jars, does anyone know the shelf life for these items?

I don't want to have to open them and smell, and hope that they don't give my kids food poisoning,

I was wondering if anyone had any info to help me to determine just how long these foods, when properly pressure processed will store in ideal conditions
If the jars have remained sealed, the food inside can't actually rot or spoil as there's no bacteria alive in the jar to cause it. So the food would be safe to eat, regardless of age. Canned foods can last decades easily. Over time, the texture and flavor can suffer, but as long as it's still sealed, the food is safe to eat.
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Old 03-22-2011, 02:35 PM
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Our modern culture has been teaching folks about this 'shelf-life' thing. I suspect part of it is capitalism, to force folks to throw out older canned food to buy fresher canned goods.

I was taught as a child to press the button on the lid. My wife does the same thing. We taught our children to do it. It works. in the 2000's we ate foods that were canned in the 1930s. They were fine.

Meat always needs to be canned in an acidic solution. Either citric acid [tomato, lemon, any citric source] or vinegar. [of course vinegar is a complete preservative so canning is not entirely required if you use vinegar. We have stuff in crocks with vinegar]

Once canned [pressure-cooker or hot-water-bath] a vacuum is formed inside the jar. Ideally during cooking all pathogens were killed inside. But if anything survived, and starts to grow it will release the vacuum. Telling you that it is no longer 'good'.

The system of mason-jar home canning was really pretty smart. It has been with us for many decades and it works.



Dinka-dink.
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Old 03-22-2011, 02:38 PM
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One more thing, canned foods can go bad. But with this invention the device tells us when it has gone bad. It is an indicator.
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Old 03-22-2011, 02:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ForestBeekeeper View Post
Our modern culture has been teaching folks about this 'shelf-life' thing. I suspect part of it is capitalism, to force folks to throw out older canned food to buy fresher canned goods.

I was taught as a child to press the button on the lid. My wife does the same thing. We taught our children to do it. It works. in the 2000's we ate foods that were canned in the 1930s. They were fine.

Meat always needs to be canned in an acidic solution. Either citric acid [tomato, lemon, any citric source] or vinegar. [of course vinegar is a complete preservative so canning is not entirely required if you use vinegar. We have stuff in crocks with vinegar]

Once canned [pressure-cooker or hot-water-bath] a vacuum is formed inside the jar. Ideally during cooking all pathogens were killed inside. But if anything survived, and starts to grow it will release the vacuum. Telling you that it is no longer 'good'.

The system of mason-jar home canning was really pretty smart. It has been with us for many decades and it works.



Dinka-dink.
I think planned obsolecence is a big part of it also companys are prol worried bout litigation so they hedge there bets and mark a much shorter shelf life
nothing worse than a multi million dollar lawsuit because someone went few weeks past your exp date an got sick that an its more money
Old 03-22-2011, 03:26 PM
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okay so you can eat something from 1930's and if it looks good and smells good it won't kill you?

so basically you would have to go by texture and smell to determine spoilage.

thanks for your responses, I'm honestly looking for answers, I was hoping that there was a web site somewhere with info on home processing shelf life or something
Old 03-22-2011, 03:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by perduepro View Post
okay so you can eat something from 1930's and if it looks good and smells good it won't kill you?

so basically you would have to go by texture and smell to determine spoilage.

thanks for your responses, I'm honestly looking for answers, I was hoping that there was a web site somewhere with info on home processing shelf life or something
I guess I missed it. Sorry, my bad.

Who said anything about texture or smell?

Those are completely different topics from spoilage.

I thought we were discussing spoilage. Pathogens, bacteria that may begin to grow inside canned food.

If you wish to discuss texture and smell [which is completely different from spoilage] than I have no idea.
Old 03-22-2011, 03:35 PM
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Isn't a food item's change in texture and smell and indicator of spoilage?

I mean I've seen canned food from the 60's turn black and have a rancid odor but still be perfectly sealed. I'm not eating it.
Old 03-22-2011, 03:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by perduepro View Post
Isn't a food item's change in texture and smell and indicator of spoilage?

I mean I've seen canned food from the 60's turn black and have a rancid odor but still be perfectly sealed. I'm not eating it.
not nessesairaly i have stuff thats gotten a lil darker but still taste great a decade later not sure id try something from the 30s but if i was hungry i may if im able to identify it

and you sure that it was food originaly and not something else? but if it smells like its gone bad when you open it dont eat it
Old 03-22-2011, 03:56 PM
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I just asked my wife.

She says that it is very likely with tin-cans when they have been dented that a crack forms along the dent, allowing air inside so pathogens can grow. When opening tin-cans with dents always examine the contents.

In the context of mason-jar canning, she says that she does recall seeing a jar of canned potatoes that had began to discolor even though the seal was still good. So apparently it does happen in a small percentage. She has no idea why.

I did not think it was possible. She says it is. I stand corrected.

Though it is still my understanding that such is extremely rare.

I apologize if my previous post was rude. I was in error.



When discussing canned meats, she says that she has never seen any meat in tomato-juice go bad. But it would depend on the contaminant. If there were a contaminant that could survive the canning process, and then survive the acid to start growing again, she thinks it might be possible.

Talking with her about contaminants, we can see if there were some poison that got in with the meat, there is a possibility that the poison could ruin the meat. Aside from the fact that it is also poisoned.

She also says to remember than when corn-salting or pickling meat it is very common to see discoloring. So if you canned meat in a salt brine, or in a vinegar solution, you will often see discoloring in the meat years later. But it is normal.

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Old 03-22-2011, 04:16 PM
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Just to interject a little logic here. If you have canned goods on the shelf that are 50 years old there is something wrong.
Old 03-22-2011, 05:18 PM
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Canned goods last a long time, I've had home canned potatos for 8+ years, still good, as far as store bought canned goods, I've had a few that rusted out, and tomato soup after 9 years start to eat the cans from the inside...tasted metallic....when in doubt throw it out.
Remember the date on the can is a best by date...remember the producer wants you to eat it when it taste the best so you will buy more...maybe even toss it after so long so you will buy more...You should see my dinner guest when they see the dates on my cans and boxed stuff...alot of the city slickers won't touch it as they formed the opinion that the date is expiration, not best buy.. I figure that they just haven't been hungry enough yet.
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Old 03-22-2011, 06:50 PM
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There is not set time period things will automatically go bad, wether you canned them or some factory canned them.

There is really no way to know until you open the jar.


Sorry if that does not answer you question-there is no hard and fast answer though.
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