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Old 03-04-2011, 10:27 AM
mountainmansurvival mountainmansurvival is offline
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Default 1 year supply per person



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I could use a review and suggestions.

I am setting up 1 year's worth of food per person (Adult). I calculated 2000 calories per day which leads to 730,000 calories per person, per year. I went for long term storage stuff but you should know I am also canning and growing in my BRAND NEW GARDEN! (Yes I am very excited that my garden will very soon be expanded to almost 2 acres)

So, for very basic survival what do you all think of this?








Total calorie needs/person: 730,000 calories per person



White rice: 300 pounds per person (450,000 calories) -$0.3518 per pound ($105.54)

1 cup uncooked rice : 600 calories
2.5 cups per pound : 1500 calories per pound

Pinto Beans: 150 pounds per person: (210,000 calories) - $0.4198 per pound ($62.97)

1 cup uncooked pinto beans : 700 calories
2 cups dry beans per pound : 1400 calories

Black Beans: 25 pounds per person: (34.000) -$0.7952 per pound ($19.88)

1 cup uncooked black beans: 680 calories
2 cups dry beans per pound : 1360 calories

Honey: 5 pounds honey: (6750 calories) - $56.40 per pound ($282.00)

1 cup honey : 1000 calories
1 1/3 cups per pound: 1350 calories

Wheat: 100 pounds per person: (140,000 calories) - $1.00 per pound (wheatsales.com) ($100)

1 pound wheat: 1400 calories

Salt: 10 pounds per person - $0.1552 per pound ($1.55)

Sugar: 25 pounds per person - $0. 5796 per pound ($14.43)



Total Estimated food costs per person: $586.37
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Old 03-04-2011, 10:47 AM
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That sounds about right, but you can have a bit more variety at the price you came to. A one year supply of food can be bought for $399 here: http://beprepared.com/product.asp_Q_...%20&%20Legumes



Fill in with some FD or dehydrated meats, fruits and veggies and I think you've got a winner at about the same price you calculated.
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Old 03-04-2011, 10:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Skyjump136 View Post
That sounds about right, but you can have a bit more variety at the price you came to. A one year supply of food can be bought for $399 here: http://beprepared.com/product.asp_Q_...%20&%20Legumes



Fill in with some FD or dehydrated meats, fruits and veggies and I think you've got a winner at about the same price you calculated.
This is awesome . . . except I can't see what it includes. Maybe I am just a total moron, but when I go try and look up what is included, I can't seem to find it.

Any ideas what is included?

Also, I found the cost difference. They are planning for 1600 calories per day per person instead of 2000. Recalculated, it is almost a wash but the variety would be good if I could just figure out what the heck is in the buckets. LOL
 
Old 03-04-2011, 10:59 AM
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I would incease your calories by a 1/3, 3000 or more

More is always better, especially if you expect to do some physcial labor. Great job on that 2 acre garden...WOW!
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Old 03-04-2011, 11:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainmansurvival View Post
This is awesome . . . except I can't see what it includes. Maybe I am just a total moron, but when I go try and look up what is included, I can't seem to find it.

Any ideas what is included?

Also, I found the cost difference. They are planning for 1600 calories per day per person instead of 2000. Recalculated, it is almost a wash but the variety would be good if I could just figure out what the heck is in the buckets. LOL
may be a wash but also keep in mind the cost of those buckets(i believe 6 or 7 gallon) and also the mylar and o2 absorbers they come packed with. all ready to go. those buckets are roughly 10 bucks apiece with lids brand new. plus the maylar and o2 and you have 100 bucks right there in just the storage.

but dont forget the grain mill for grinding...
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Old 03-04-2011, 11:02 AM
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may be a wash but also keep in mind the cost of those buckets(i believe 6 or 7 gallon) and also the mylar and o2 absorbers they come packed with. all ready to go. those buckets are roughly 10 bucks apiece with lids brand new. plus the maylar and o2 and you have 100 bucks right there in just the storage.

but dont forget the grain mill for grinding...
Yea I had thought about the Mylar. The buckets I am finding fairly cheap but the Mylar is around $0.85 per bag or so.
Old 03-04-2011, 11:02 AM
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http://beprepared.com/article.asp?ai=369

Contents of the Year Supply of Grains and Legumes
Contents: Qty
Hard Red Wheat 2
Hard White Wheat 2
White Rice 2
Regular Rolled Oats 2
Pinto Beans 1
Black Beans 1

"This Year supply of grains and legumes is designed to provide more than the minimum recommended storage amounts of both grains and legumes for one person for a year † 318 pounds of grains and † 82 pounds of legumes. The Year Supply of Grains and Legumes is over 3,900 servings. About 1600 calories per day. "

You'll need to fill in with a few other items to come to 2000cal/day but this is a great start. Btw, shipping is EXTREMELY CHEAP through these guys. I'd bet $20/500 lbs if memory serves. And no tax outside Utah.
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Old 03-04-2011, 11:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyjump136 View Post
http://beprepared.com/article.asp?ai=369

Contents of the Year Supply of Grains and Legumes
Contents: Qty
Hard Red Wheat 2
Hard White Wheat 2
White Rice 2
Regular Rolled Oats 2
Pinto Beans 1
Black Beans 1

"This Year supply of grains and legumes is designed to provide more than the minimum recommended storage amounts of both grains and legumes for one person for a year † 318 pounds of grains and † 82 pounds of legumes. The Year Supply of Grains and Legumes is over 3,900 servings. About 1600 calories per day. "

You'll need to fill in with a few other items to come to 2000cal/day but this is a great start. Btw, shipping is EXTREMELY CHEAP through these guys. I'd bet $20/500 lbs if memory serves. And no tax outside Utah.
Awesome. (Now I have to type more because it said my message was too short)
Old 03-04-2011, 11:13 AM
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I put myself on their e-mail reminder list. They are out of stock on a lot of stuff. I wonder if that is super common right now . . .
Old 03-04-2011, 11:26 AM
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I'd add about a pound of garlic granuals, a pound of cumin, a pound of dried oragono,and 2 pounds of dried chillies no make that 5 pounds, for each person.
Old 03-04-2011, 11:29 AM
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I'd add about a pound of garlic granuals, a pound of cumin, a pound of dried oragono,and 2 pounds of dried chillies no make that 5 pounds, for each person.
Spices! Of course. Why didn't I think of that.

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Old 03-04-2011, 11:36 AM
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I put myself on their e-mail reminder list. They are out of stock on a lot of stuff. I wonder if that is super common right now . . .
Last time I ordered this from them they said it was out of stock. Even so, it shipped within 2 weeks. At least you know you are getting fresh stuff!
Old 03-04-2011, 11:41 AM
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Don't forget that there is a life on spices. Rotate every year.
Old 03-04-2011, 11:53 AM
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5 pounds of honey at costco is about $13, so $56.40 per pound is way too much.
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Old 03-04-2011, 12:10 PM
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5 pounds of honey at costco is about $13, so $56.40 per pound is way too much.
Agreed - this stuff is convenient but expect to pay a premium for that convenience.
Old 03-04-2011, 12:11 PM
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White rice is totally inferior to other grains and should be avoided in a low calorie diet, unless the rest of your food leans heavily on vegetables and fruits. And not any kind of vegetables and fruits, they have to be varied.

The only vitamin found in any significant amounts in rice is B6, or pyridoxine. But if you include beans and wheat, you won’t have any lack of B6 anyway. The minerals of significant amounts are zinc and copper, but they are at least twice as abundant in beans and wheat.
Old 03-04-2011, 12:20 PM
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Shelf Life?
Old 03-04-2011, 12:22 PM
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Originally Posted by ImThatGuy View Post
5 pounds of honey at costco is about $13, so $56.40 per pound is way too much.
you know, it is possible I simply read the website wrong. I will double check in person.

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Old 03-04-2011, 12:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OhioMan View Post
I would incease your calories by a 1/3, 3000 or more

More is always better, especially if you expect to do some physcial labor. Great job on that 2 acre garden...WOW!
I definately agree. 2,000 calories might be enough for bunker type survival where you'd mostly be sedantary. But for most of us, it's pitifully low because of the amount of labor we'll be doing.

Whenever putting away basics, I always suggest variety too. For example, don't just store white rice, when there are other varieties of rice and other grains such as wheat, barley, popcorn (makes the best cornmeal), etc. And pasta is a must!

Same with beans. Instead of just pintos, there are black beans, great northerns, garbanzos, etc.

Variety is not only important nutritionally, but for keeping the meals varied and interesting. Appetite fatigue can be dangerous.

Which of course also means that storing a variety of spices is important. If you store a basic 5 or 6, you limit yourself in what foods you can create. They say variety is the spice of life. I say spices are the variety of life.

There's no sense eating boring foods when there are cultures all around the world that use these same staple ingredients. You can have cajun food one meal, mexican the next, maybe middle eastern, indian or italian after that using the same basic staples. The only difference is in how they season the foods.

Then there's cooking methods. Today, it makes sense to make a big pot of beans and put the leftovers in the fridge or freezer. Without refrigeration, you can realistically only make as much as your group/family can eat in a single meal. That can be energy intensive unless you look into alternate cooking methods. Solar cooking is one option in sunny weather. Another is to make a highly insulated pot cozy. Start your soaked beans in a pressure cooker and transfer them to the pot cozy to finish cooking with their residual heat. This uses a LOT less cooking fuel. This also works with grains. And of course beans can be cracked or ground to make them cook even faster.
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Old 03-04-2011, 12:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Cumulunimbus View Post
White rice is totally inferior to other grains and should be avoided in a low calorie diet, unless the rest of your food leans heavily on vegetables and fruits. And not any kind of vegetables and fruits, they have to be varied.

The only vitamin found in any significant amounts in rice is B6, or pyridoxine. But if you include beans and wheat, you won’t have any lack of B6 anyway. The minerals of significant amounts are zinc and copper, but they are at least twice as abundant in beans and wheat.
So what would you substitute for rice?
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