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Old 02-23-2011, 09:09 PM
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w6f7 w6f7 is offline
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Default Make your own knife from sawzall blade



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Ok folks, I figured I'd do a walkthrough of how I make these. Maybe some folk will give it a go.

Select sawblade and bend it to ensure it hasn't lost it's temper. If it doesn't return to straight, toss it.





Next, i cover one side of the blade with masking tape and draw what I'm thinking.



Using a dremel with cutoff wheel I cut the clip.



Take the old grinder and shape the tang.



Now you work with bare hands to ensure the blade doesn't get hot. Dunk it in water every time it feels warm.

Rounding the belly.



Viola, blade blank.


Angle grinder mounted with some allthread is how i rough in the blade bevels.
Simply draw the blade across the disk like you were sharpening a knife.
Continually inspect the blade and keep it cool.



At this point, I switch to my cheap belt sander.



60 grit. Refine the grind and clean the flats




Once you get it evened up and the edge is about as thick as a hair, switch to 120 grit and refine the grinds and blend the transition from the bevel to the flats until you get a full length burr.




Now is when I bring the spine down to the point. If you profile the point during the grind you may round off your point.



Sanding pad to remove the burr and the blade is ready for a handle.




Antler , leather, and copper is selected for a quick handle.


Slot the antler guard with the dremel cutoff wheel and drill the crap out of the back part.



Fit's good. Notice I made the tang slimmer and ground notches in the tang for the epoxy.


Everything fits and is ready for epoxy.


Mix your 2 part 2 ton epoxy very well. Remember it has never been together before.


Assembly with epoxy between everything. Get as much in there as you can.


All clamped up and will be ready to the next day.


I have no photos of sanding the handle. You can use the flap disk on the angle grinder, a regular metal working grinder, files, rasps, whatever to shape it. After shaping, sand it to your desired finish.




NOTES- The temper is never removed from the blade so hardening and heat treating is unnecessary.

2 ton epoxy is stronger that any pin or bolt out there.

These thin saw blades make excellent fillet knives.
Old 02-23-2011, 09:10 PM
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A few other sawzall bladed knives I've made.
Patch knife

Fillet

Little utility


I hope you folks get something outta this thread. Happy sawblade recycling.
Old 02-23-2011, 09:25 PM
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Excellent work! Great handles!
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Old 02-23-2011, 10:43 PM
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Great work, yet another project for the shop. Thanks
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Old 02-23-2011, 10:54 PM
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Very cool!


Of course I would have to use new...all my blades seem to lose temper for some odd reason.
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Old 02-23-2011, 11:10 PM
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very way cool...if there's such a phrase haha

how thick are those sawzall blades?
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Old 02-24-2011, 11:24 AM
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The blades vary from 1/32" to maybe 3/32". That one is real close to 1/16".

They are great around the kitchen and light field use.
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Old 02-25-2011, 10:48 AM
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Awesome work, you gave me some great ideas on handles! And maybe I'll use a saw blade for my fishing knife i want to make
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Old 02-25-2011, 08:59 PM
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Whoa, that is sweet! That is a good looking knife!
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Old 02-25-2011, 09:05 PM
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What a great post. Thank you. Nicely done!
Old 02-26-2011, 11:10 PM
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Great looking blades! One thing to note, a lot of saw blades have hardened teeth welded to a softer spine.
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Old 02-28-2011, 10:26 PM
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If you can find them, try the Bosch brand "Demolition" blades, those things are by far the thickest strongest sawzall blades I've ever used, they are pricey but I think they'd work a LOT better than your average run of the mill sawzall blade.
The blades are so thick and strong that they rarely bend, almost dangerous to use in a sawzall because of the vicious kickback if the blade binds in whatever you're cutting.
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Old 02-28-2011, 10:42 PM
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KSghost, I would venture that most I use are Milwaukee "wreckers".

We have limited hardware stores here. I have also used circular saw blades. Even the carbide tip ones have a steel probleby close to L6 as the base with a, guessing, 54-56 Rc.

Thanks for your comment, I'm always open to new source steel.
Old 03-07-2011, 10:56 PM
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my grandpa always uses old files for this, but I like the sawzall blades just as much! I'll give it a try!
Old 03-09-2011, 07:04 PM
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I now have my next project. Thanks for the outstanding instructions.
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Old 03-14-2011, 10:20 AM
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I know what I;m doing this weekend now....
I've always wanted to construct my own baldes, thanks for demystifying this for me.
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Old 03-14-2011, 10:38 AM
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That is awesome, thanks for sharing.
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Old 03-14-2011, 09:59 PM
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by w6f7 View Post
Ok folks, I figured I'd do a walkthrough of how I make these. Maybe some folk will give it a go.

Select sawblade and bend it to ensure it hasn't lost it's temper. If it doesn't return to straight, toss it.





Next, i cover one side of the blade with masking tape and draw what I'm thinking.



Using a dremel with cutoff wheel I cut the clip.



Take the old grinder and shape the tang.



Now you work with bare hands to ensure the blade doesn't get hot. Dunk it in water every time it feels warm.

Rounding the belly.



Viola, blade blank.


Angle grinder mounted with some allthread is how i rough in the blade bevels.
Simply draw the blade across the disk like you were sharpening a knife.
Continually inspect the blade and keep it cool.



At this point, I switch to my cheap belt sander.



60 grit. Refine the grind and clean the flats




Once you get it evened up and the edge is about as thick as a hair, switch to 120 grit and refine the grinds and blend the transition from the bevel to the flats until you get a full length burr.




Now is when I bring the spine down to the point. If you profile the point during the grind you may round off your point.



Sanding pad to remove the burr and the blade is ready for a handle.




Antler , leather, and copper is selected for a quick handle.


Slot the antler guard with the dremel cutoff wheel and drill the crap out of the back part.



Fit's good. Notice I made the tang slimmer and ground notches in the tang for the epoxy.


Everything fits and is ready for epoxy.


Mix your 2 part 2 ton epoxy very well. Remember it has never been together before.


Assembly with epoxy between everything. Get as much in there as you can.


All clamped up and will be ready to the next day.


I have no photos of sanding the handle. You can use the flap disk on the angle grinder, a regular metal working grinder, files, rasps, whatever to shape it. After shaping, sand it to your desired finish.




NOTES- The temper is never removed from the blade so hardening and heat treating is unnecessary.

2 ton epoxy is stronger that any pin or bolt out there.

These thin saw blades make excellent fillet knives.
Fantastic job brother!!!
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Old 03-27-2011, 12:33 PM
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