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Old 02-06-2011, 02:27 PM
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Default Anyone stock Cheese Wheels? More protien than meat. Long storage life.



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I have been kicking around this idea or a while but haven't pulled the trigger on it yet because of costs. Just saw it on "Modern Marvels" and I think it is time to make a buy. I wanted to get some opinions here first.

Waxed Cheese Wheels. Anyone else stock these? Hard cheeses have more protein than beef per ounce. Has a lot of fats and oils and a bucketfuls of calories. And it can store for long term without spoiling. In fact, it may taste better as it ages.

The only problem I see is rotating it eating a whole wheel might not be too appetizing now. But if food becomes scares, I bet I could wolf down 30 lbs in a month.

I think I would like some Romano or Parmesan something for the longevity. Some Swiss/ Jarlsberg because I like it.


Can anyone else share their experiences or thoughts?

Thanks!
Vic
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Old 02-06-2011, 02:30 PM
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...just wondering how it compares $$-wise ounce for ounce with other types of protein?
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Old 02-06-2011, 02:31 PM
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Cheese making isn't all that complex, and it takes a lot of the expense out of the business. Also, think trade. Trade always goes on, and cheese is a good trade item when times are hard, and people are hungry. (BTW, so is sausage....) A sample of the cheese will have the mold you need to make it. And there's always limburger....
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Old 02-06-2011, 02:40 PM
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Good night! Those wheels are expensive.. then again it would equal out. Subscribed
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Old 02-06-2011, 02:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grandma View Post
...just wondering how it compares $$-wise ounce for ounce with other types of protein?
A 20 lb wheel of Parmesan will run about 100$-200$ depending on brand. About 5-10$ a lb.
Romano tends to cost a little bit more. But about 10$ a pound.
Jarlsberg or Swiss is about 5-10$ a pound also.

Here are the Protien contents:
Cheese:
* Medium cheeses (Cheddar, Swiss) – 7 or 8 grams per oz
* Hard cheeses (Parmesan) – 10 grams per oz
Beef
* Steak, 6 oz – 42 grams
* Most cuts of beef – 7 grams of protein per ounce
Chicken
* Chicken breast, 3.5 oz - 30 grams protein
* Chicken thigh – 10 grams (for average size)
http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/wha...roteinfood.htm

So price wise, it 5-10$ an lb pretty much the same as prime cut beefs. But it should store better than beef. That is my main concern. Of course, there are the gourmet cheeses that will run you into the 50$ plus per lb. But I am not interested in those too much.
Old 02-06-2011, 02:44 PM
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Originally Posted by joshiedoom View Post
Good night! Those wheels are expensive.. then again it would equal out. Subscribed
LOL that is why I haven't made an investment in it yet. If I go ahead and get some and store it wrong... I just molded my investment away But I see in fancy stores that they just have the wheels right out on the store-room floor without any type of refrigeration or anything. On documentaries, you see them stored in warehouses without any refrigeration either.

Thing is, they used to transport cheese across deserts and such for trade and use. This food was MEANT to last. High protein, calcium, fats, calories...

I am not thinking of an 80lb wheel or gourmet quality stuff. But a few wheels of 20lb Wisconsin cheddar at a time is do-able.
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Old 02-06-2011, 02:45 PM
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I just started brewing my own beer, and at the supply store they have cheese making supplies, that got me thinking the same thing. Also, Im sick of buying cheese and I think it sounds like a good hobby. If anyone does it they should post some pics for sure
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Old 02-06-2011, 02:56 PM
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Originally Posted by joshiedoom View Post
Woah.. I retract my previous statement.. check out this fine wheel...

http://www.amazon.com/Parmigiano-Reg.../dp/B0029Y12G6
Wow that is 26$ a lb LOL But can you imagine rotating out an 80 lb wheel of cheese?
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Old 02-06-2011, 03:01 PM
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I guess waxed cheese can store for 25 years or longer in mild temps according to this article.

Quote:
"All you have to do is buy the hard blocks of cheese that you want now in order to have them stored for up to the next 25 years. Cheese wax prevents your cheese from developing mold or bacteria and it keeps the moisture in... Cheese treated with cheese wax will store for up to 25 years at a mild to cool temperature. "
http://preparednesspro.wordpress.com...save-us-all-2/
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Old 02-06-2011, 03:57 PM
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ROFLMAO! Well you have an invite to come help me make the cheeses<smile>. The Plan is to make hard cheeses this year. Since I am expecting 10 gals of milk per day and cheese is about a pound of cheese per gallon of milk.....I have mastered soft cheeses and have made harder cheeses ( aged 3 mos or so) but tis year will be a marathon of hard aged ones. The hard part for me will be the lifting and totin'<smile>. I actually considered the duhgeon( basement) as a perfect cheese cave when I bought the house. Cheesemaking takes some time but it really is not * hard*.

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Old 02-06-2011, 04:05 PM
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"But if food becomes scares, I bet I could wolf down 30 lbs in a month."

You'd save a small fortune on toilet paper, due to the fact that you would hit the restroom for 2 months!!
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Old 02-06-2011, 04:09 PM
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Good thread, Vic! How about just waxing your own (smaller) blocks of cheese?
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Old 02-06-2011, 04:21 PM
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Why big blocks of waxed cheese. Why not buy the little blocks of wax cheese?
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Old 02-06-2011, 04:22 PM
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by vicdotcom View Post
I have been kicking around this idea or a while but haven't pulled the trigger on it yet because of costs. Just saw it on "Modern Marvels" and I think it is time to make a buy. I wanted to get some opinions here first.

Waxed Cheese Wheels. Anyone else stock these? Hard cheeses have more protein than beef per ounce. Has a lot of fats and oils and a bucketfuls of calories. And it can store for long term without spoiling. In fact, it may taste better as it ages.

The only problem I see is rotating it eating a whole wheel might not be too appetizing now. But if food becomes scares, I bet I could wolf down 30 lbs in a month.

I think I would like some Romano or Parmesan something for the longevity. Some Swiss/ Jarlsberg because I like it.


Can anyone else share their experiences or thoughts?

Thanks!
Vic
You and I are watching the same thing. My wife and I were having that same conversation just now. Growing up, her family used to buy full wheels every year. But she was up in the Northeast in RI. They bought it locally.

If you have any local cheese shops, go to those and try various kinds before you buy anything. You are buying a lot at a time and you want to make sure you absolutely enjoy it before you spend that much money.
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Old 02-06-2011, 04:35 PM
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Here is an interesting article on waxing your own cheese I found while looking into this post.




So picture this. It’s a bona fide emergency survival situation. You are holed up on your home and living off of the emergency preparedness supplies you stored. And you’ve got one heck of a hankering for some yummy melted cheese. But you’re just not in the mood for the Velveeta, that nasty powdered stuff, or the “squirt” kind of cheese. You want a good solid bite of a yummy Parmesan, or Swiss, or a sharp cheddar. (I’m making myself drool even as I write this.) But hey, cheese doesn’t store for a very long time, right? Well, in this case, I’m happy to tell you that you’re wrong. And if you’re a true cheese addict, then you’ll be happy to hear that you’re wrong for once, right?



cheese-wax-goudaSo here’s the good news. You CAN have your favorite cheese on hand, even in an emergency, and even though no stores are open and you have no access to electricity. All you have to do is buy the hard blocks of cheese that you want now in order to have them stored for up to the next 25 years. Cheese wax prevents your cheese from developing mold or bacteria and it keeps the moisture in. Simply use a combination of dipping and brushing with a natural boar’s hair brush to apply the melted cheese wax liberally to your block of cheese, let it harden, and then, VOILA – you’ve got your wish. Cheese treated with cheese wax will store for up to 25 years at a mild to cool temperature. Sure, it will continue to age. But it sure won’t get moldy! (And even if it does in parts, you can simply cut off that part, and re-wax over it.) Be sure that you select block sizes of cheese that you and your family can easily consume within a 3 to 5 day period in order to avoid it going bad once you’ve cut into it.





A couple of tips you should know though.

1. cheeseclothDon’t use paraffin wax. It tends to crack. Cheese wax warms slower and heats to a higher temperature and thus plies better to your cheese shapes and sizes. Cheese wax is also less crumbly and you can use less of it than paraffin. Remember, it’s reusable too!



2. I have yet to find a hard cheese that I can’t wax. So long as it’s hard enough to be in a solid block, you can wax it.
3. You don’t need cheesecloth, but if you desire to use it prior to your wax layers, it may be helpful getting the wax off. I haven’t had any problems without it though.



4. It’s best to melt the cheese wax in a double boiler as opposed to direct heat. Any pan you use to melt your cheesewax in will be your designated cheese wax pan. They are impossible to get clean afterwards. So be forewarned.
5. cheese-wax-double-broilers1The less you handle the cheese with your hands the better. Use food handling gloves.



6. Dip the cheese in for about 5 seconds, then bring it out and HOLD it there for about 90 seconds. Do 3 layers of dipping and then one layer of brushing. (Using the natural boar’s hair brush) The reason why you want to use this kind of brush specifically is because other brushes will apply the cheese wax too thick, or with crevices, etc. This kind of brush is perfect for cheese waxing.
7. You don’t need to use food-grade labels for your cheese, however, it’s smart to use a label on the outside of your cheese just prior to the last wax layer. That way you don’t have to worry about it falling off. Be sure to label not only the kind of cheese it is, but when it was waxed as well.
8. cheese-wax-brushDon’t store your waxed cheese in additional containers. Just stack them on top of like cheeses and let them breathe. I like to hang them from the ceiling in a “fishing net” kind of contraption.
9. Be sure to check for pockets or crevices that didn’t get sealed. Four total thin layers of wax is a good practice. There’s no need to do more coats than that.
10. The cheese surface should be clean and dry prior to waxing.
11. If your 2nd and 3rd coats are applied while the prior coat is still just a bit warm you will get a better adhesion.
12. Cheese wax can be re-used several times. You can simply wash it in warm water, let it dry and then re-melt it. So when you remove cheese wax from your cheeses, you can simply reheat and reapply the wax. Simply heat the cheese wax to about 200 degrees F. This will also ensure that you’re not transferring any bacteria or unnecessary moisture to your new cheese–even when you’re putting it on your cheese which is cooler.
13. You do not need to filter the cheese wax after you melt it. So don’t worry about that step.
14. Your first coat will have some unevenness to it. Don’t worry. The 2nd and 3rd coat will even it out just fine.
15. Cheese will respond to gravity. So using cheesewax vs. paraffin is important as it’s more pliable. I periodically turn my cheese in view of the gravitational pull.

cheese-wax-waxCheese wax can be found multiple places online or in your local health food stores. I also recommend that you use red or black cheesewax as it will prevent more light from getting int. You should also have no problem finding a boar bristle brush either.



Once you get the hang of this cheese waxing stuff you can progress to making your own cheese from powdered milk in any flavor you decide! Yummy!
Old 02-06-2011, 04:39 PM
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thats actually a good comment by ALPHARAMM.

Your body can handle only meat as a diety source without getting the runs or other problems.


Cheese may be equal to meat in most ways but store longer..... but how well can your body actually process it when its a large protion of your food intake?
Old 02-06-2011, 04:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vicdotcom View Post
I have been kicking around this idea or a while but haven't pulled the trigger on it yet because of costs. Just saw it on "Modern Marvels" and I think it is time to make a buy. I wanted to get some opinions here first.

Waxed Cheese Wheels. Anyone else stock these? Hard cheeses have more protein than beef per ounce. Has a lot of fats and oils and a bucketfuls of calories. And it can store for long term without spoiling. In fact, it may taste better as it ages.

The only problem I see is rotating it eating a whole wheel might not be too appetizing now. But if food becomes scares, I bet I could wolf down 30 lbs in a month.

I think I would like some Romano or Parmesan something for the longevity. Some Swiss/ Jarlsberg because I like it.


Can anyone else share their experiences or thoughts?

Thanks!
Vic
1 pound of cheese a day?

Better prep a lot of Ex-lax along with your cheese wheels.
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Old 02-06-2011, 04:57 PM
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I'd trade gold for cheese if I haven't had any in a while. I've got various FD cheeses and we'll be looking into a dairy goat sometime this year.
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Old 02-06-2011, 05:16 PM
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I've been buying the smaller (1 lb) blocks of cheddar cheese that are already waxed. I have an extra fridge in the garage, so I keep them stored there. I figure I'm extending the storage life by keeping them cold. If things go south and there's no electricity to keep the fridge running, I've still got a few years on the cheese if I move it to a cool storage location. I do the same thing with my MREs, keep them in the fridge which is supposed to extend their storage life.
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