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Old 02-03-2011, 12:47 PM
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Default Primitive Water Containers?



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I'm not sure if this belongs here or in the DIY forum since i'm asking about them instead of showing a tutorial.

If you somehow lost or broke your only water container in the bush, how would you improvise a new water container?

I'm mostly interested in very primitive stuff. For instance, if you've got a plastic bag you're all set. If you've got some duct tape to go with it, all the better. But what if you're forced to use only what is scavengable from the surrounding wilderness areas?

I've seen some fire-made bowls, but nothing as far as making a container that allows you to transport some water with you.
Old 02-03-2011, 12:55 PM
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what about an animal skin? like a goat? or an animal bladder?


Not really available quickly though!
Old 02-03-2011, 01:49 PM
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For some water, though not too much, soak a piece of clothing in water. If you walk through some tall grass with morning dew on it, it will soak the water up, and you can wring it out later. Of course, thats what I would do if I had absolutely nothing else.

Dried out animal bladders are what the Indians used to use, although I have never tried that one. I've also heard of using birch bark as a sort of container.

Waterproof material that you may be wearing could also be made into a pouch.

Those are just off the top of my head, and I've only had experience with the top one.
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Old 02-03-2011, 04:48 PM
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Not sure if I'm joking or not but I have seen dried out bull scrotums made into a "purse" type container. It was dried out and I'm sure it was "tanned" as you would tan a hide and it looks like it would have held 2-3 quarts of fluid. Kill the bull clean out the sack, fill with water and tie off the top with 550 cord. Then you also have meat for dinner. I'm sure an elk sack would work too.
Old 02-03-2011, 05:39 PM
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Gourds if they grow in your area.

Dry them out in the sun or by the fire and drill a hole in it. Can carry half a gallon.


I live in Florida.


As thelastboyscout and Huntercook15 mentioned animal bladders. It holds pee, so it will hold water also.

Obvious one is clay pots. Even crude ones are effective.
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Old 02-03-2011, 06:21 PM
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I've made water transport devises from bamboo. I thought I had a photo but I can't find it. But they are pretty simple and should be self explanatory if you have access to any.
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Old 02-03-2011, 07:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hubb View Post
I've made water transport devises from bamboo. I thought I had a photo but I can't find it. But they are pretty simple and should be self explanatory if you have access to any.
YES!!

One of the most versatile plants (actually a grass) you will find out there. You can:

- eat it (young shoots)
- get clean water from it
- carry water in it
- cook with it (stew or steam)
- make friction fire and it has the tinder already inside
- make shelter
- weave baskets
- make weapons (spears, arrows, arrow heads, knife, bow)
- make tools (spoons, cups, ladders, furniture)


man countless other things. I always take note of natural crops of this grass in my area.

Here are some pictures.














Man I love this stuff.
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Old 02-03-2011, 07:20 PM
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Around here, birch bark is plentiful. I would probably make something out of that, sealed with pine sap.
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Old 02-03-2011, 08:55 PM
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I can't echo enough how valuable bamboo is. I've fiddled around with it before, although admittedly have never used it while camping. The stuff is incredible. SO multi-purpose. Other than bamboo, the poster who mentioned tying your shirt around your ankles or calves if your in semi-high grass o collect dew is very practical and effortless.

It's a great question to be honest.... I'm racking my brain to think of things off the top of my head. I don't wanna look it up because then I'd feel like I'm cheating! Bamboo always comes to mind... Maybe a stump of a decent sized tree dug out? You can heat up rocks and throw them into the water until its boiled. Looking forward to seeing more answers!
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Old 02-03-2011, 09:07 PM
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Animal Bladders were used for most of mans existence to hold water.
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Old 02-04-2011, 09:40 AM
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If you have some good birch trees in your area i have found some excellent info on how to make container using the bark.

Here's a link to some pictures: http://www.wildwoodsurvival.com/surv...ark/index.html
Old 02-04-2011, 08:54 PM
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Some options in my area include aspen bark bent and sealed with spruce pitch, a narrow, tightly woven willow basket with an aspen wood "collar" at the top, coated on the inside with pitch and corked with a stick, or a coiled cordage or pine needle basket, again coated on the inside with pitch.

Here are some coiled cordage baskets I've made from the twined inner bark of aspens:


Collecting the bark...




Making cordage...





A finished roll of the cordage, ready to start coiling for baskets...





Finished baskets...





I've coated this sort with pitch on the inside by throwing in some small lumps of pitch and hot rocks from the fire, and shaking until the rocks start cooling.
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Old 02-04-2011, 09:47 PM
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I have 2 gourd canteens....They work great..
Old 02-05-2011, 01:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FreedomoftheHills View Post
Some options in my area include aspen bark bent and sealed with spruce pitch, a narrow, tightly woven willow basket with an aspen wood "collar" at the top, coated on the inside with pitch and corked with a stick, or a coiled cordage or pine needle basket, again coated on the inside with pitch.
I've coated this sort with pitch on the inside by throwing in some small lumps of pitch and hot rocks from the fire, and shaking until the rocks start cooling.
Beeswax also serves well to coat the inside, plus its food safe.
Old 02-05-2011, 02:09 PM
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Birch bark baskets to carry water. You can seal the edges of your basket with pine resin. It is unnecessary for a coat on the inside of birch bark. Ray Mears shows a nice demonstration of how to make one very quickly. I, too, hope to do a DIY post on it.

If you have fire you can use embers to burn out logs for a cup or a kuska, not much a good canteen but it is a container. Perhaps burn out an old stump and see if it will hold water. That way you can now put water in it from your kuska, that you filled up from collecting morning dew with your shirt like a poster above said.

Skin, stomach, scrotum, bladder, ears skin (makes a nice pouch) can be used for carrying water. They are nice pouches anyways for just carrying things.

There are also, as pictured above, the coiled cordage baskets, which I think are really awesome but haven't ever used.
Old 02-05-2011, 03:00 PM
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I've cut an acorn squash in half, emptied out the middle, and it was a fairly decent water container for a few days.
Old 02-05-2011, 03:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JCavin View Post
I'm not sure if this belongs here or in the DIY forum since i'm asking about them instead of showing a tutorial.

If you somehow lost or broke your only water container in the bush, how would you improvise a new water container?

I'm mostly interested in very primitive stuff. For instance, if you've got a plastic bag you're all set. If you've got some duct tape to go with it, all the better. But what if you're forced to use only what is scavengable from the surrounding wilderness areas?

I've seen some fire-made bowls, but nothing as far as making a container that allows you to transport some water with you.
What they said.




And while you're carrying your water in an improvised container, keep your eyes open and there's probably littered plastic bottles and jugs just about everywhere on earth.
Old 02-05-2011, 03:38 PM
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this is a primitive bowl made by dave canterbury of the pathfinder school also co host of dual survival on discovery channel i am involved with his school and know alot of the guys and have learned from them
Old 02-05-2011, 05:21 PM
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I've read about rolling birch bark into a funnel and pinning the sides with split twigs. The botton is supposed to be folded over and sealed with pitch.

I've heard this repeated many times but I've never had success. The bark always seems to split.
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