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Old 01-29-2011, 12:40 AM
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Default Great Depression II cooking



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I did the search function but didn't get any hits, so if this has been posted before or recently, my apologies in advance. I am trying to learn how to cook...something more advanced, and healthier than hamburger helper. I want to learn how to cook the way my grandmother did, before everything was microwaveable. I suppose depression style cooking, making a little feed more mouths on a budget. I would like to get some advice on some cook books. I am wondering if it would not be healthier to bake our own bread,make meat loaves, ect. Any help would be appreciated. TP
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Old 01-29-2011, 07:32 AM
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I also like depression time cooking. Have you watched Clara on youtube? She's great, her recipes are simple and good. I made dandelion salad last spring because I watched her.

I find great old time cook books at salvation army. There is a cook book section in every SA I've been to. My latest find is a compilation of recipes from the early 1900's. It doesn't look that old because it was made by the daughters of the older folks. The recipes are so neat, I added it to my homestead book collection.

Most antique stores have a cook book selection too. You'll probably pay more but you will be more likely to find what you are looking for.

What about your granny? When one of mine died I got all of her recipes and books. No one else wanted them. When my mom died I got hers too. It's comforting to know that I can make the same foods that those women made.
Old 01-29-2011, 08:28 AM
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when i was first going out on my own i wanted to learn the same skills grandma and ma had. I found this great booklet put out by the gov't back when, to help people with
their victory garden produce. Look online for "aunt Sammy's radio recipies"
It had not only good recipies for produce, but good recipies for game such as rabbit and squirrel. book is long gone but the knowledge it gave me about cooking basics was priceless. Get an older version of the book "Joy of Cooking" by Rombauer and Becker.
it was originally written in the 30's and is absolutely the only cookbook you will ever need. Gives in depth lessons about ingredients and how they are best used, measures,
temperatures, etc etc etc.... Then all you need is to experiment with recipies to
get the results you want. Cooking is like gardening, you gotta start somewhere and there is a learning curve. Have some fun!
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Old 01-29-2011, 08:46 AM
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If you want a good CD, you may look for one called "Easy Chef's One Million of the World's Best Recipes". Not a collection of professional chef recipes at all, but rather a huge collection of recipes from plain folks. All sorts of different takes on different foods. It has a pretty good search system, too. For instance, you could search for "pumpkin", and get a huge list of different ways to use and prepare it. Or, you could put in "pumpkin pie", and get a huge list of different takes on how to make just pies. I know that you were asking about depression recipe books, but I thought of this because it seems to cover every possible way to make something and is a compilation of common folks recipes.
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Old 01-29-2011, 12:35 PM
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http://www.youtube.com/results?searc...ith+clara&aq=6

Try this channel at utube.

<iframe title="YouTube video player" class="youtube-player" type="text/html" width="640" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/br_rgE6Y3zU" frameborder="0" allowFullScreen></iframe>
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Old 01-29-2011, 07:40 PM
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Making true bone broths are one of the most important aspects of cooking that we have let go in modern times, in my opinion.


http://www.westonaprice.org/food-fea...beautiful.html

http://nourishedkitchen.com/the-benefits-of-bone-broth/

http://www.permies.com/permaculture-...s-amazing-food
Old 01-30-2011, 01:52 AM
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http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=36834
http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=15538
http://www.survivalistboards.com/sho...d.php?t=106723
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Old 01-30-2011, 02:42 AM
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Wow ! Jackpot ! Thanks, each and every one of you ! I did a google search and found Aunt Sammy's Radio Recipes in PDF ! It is dated 1976 ! I found the "Joy of Cooking " 1931 edition ( a reprint) on Amazon as well as the Easy Chef's cd . I was unaware of Clara's depression cooking on youtube ! I ordered her book and it looks like she has some DVD's too . I also struck pay dirt at home. I was talking to my mother, she cooked like my grandmother...she had to, they hadn't invented the "radar range" yet. I told her how I wanted to learn to cook the old fashioned way. She sent me up into her attic and in a big trunk were her old pre microwave cook books ! Hot dog ! Thanks for the links to the other depression era posts and the broth sites ! This has been so very helpful. God bless. TP
Old 01-30-2011, 08:11 AM
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Hillbillyhousewife.com
alot of her stuff is depresion era food.
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Old 01-31-2011, 11:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hazeleyes View Post
Hillbillyhousewife.com
alot of her stuff is depresion era food.
There is a winning link. Loved that site, thanks.

(This from a 300+lb male who loves to cook!)
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Old 01-31-2011, 11:35 PM
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I have an antique cookbook from WWII with meatless days, etc. Antique stores are a great place to find things like this.
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Old 02-01-2011, 04:38 AM
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You know this is the sort of info that keeps me coming here. Gold.
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Old 02-01-2011, 07:00 AM
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Here is a site with a number of Early American Cookbooks in .pdf:

http://digital.lib.msu.edu/projects/cookbooks/
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Old 02-01-2011, 07:20 AM
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Yeah, I can't say enough good things about The Joy of Cooking. With that book and the raw materials, you will never go hungry or get bored.
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Old 02-03-2011, 01:36 AM
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This keeps getting better ! TP
Old 02-04-2011, 07:35 PM
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I have been cooking for a while now, using non-processed or microwaved ingredients. My advice when it comes to cooking is Don't be afraid of screwing up. It takes alot of screwups (some of them BIG screwups) to create a success. Most people who "can't cook" are just scared to screw up. Tell your family when you make a dish for them "Tell me if you don't like it, because if you say you like it, I'm going to keep making it". Take your family's advice (don't use so much of that, put more of that, etc.) with a smile.

When cooking the old fashioned way, there can be so many more screw ups, but in the end, it is really much better. If you have cable, watch the show called Good Eats with Alton Brown. He breaks every dish down to scratch, and explains everything to you, showing the sciences involved in every single step. He is basically, through his show and recipes, the guy who taught me to cook. Just take it one step at a time, don't let it overwhelm you.

Happy cooking .
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Old 02-04-2011, 07:51 PM
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My dad grew up in a European peasant village during WWII.

One of his (and my) favorite dishes is called "Bortliena" (spelled phonetically)
It's basically an oily unleavened flat bread.

Here's how you make it:
Mix flour and water until it makes a watery paste.
Pour it into a pan coated in oil.
Cook until golden brown.
Salt to taste.

That's it!
It's actually quite good - especially if you roll some cheese and salami inside. Yum.

Cheap as heck and fills the belly.
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Old 02-04-2011, 09:20 PM
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Taught myself to cook as an adult, using the Joy of Cooking, and still refer to it constantly. Inherited cookbooks from both grandmothers, and also use them.

Agree with above posters, especially about Joy, making stock, risking, and the advantages (financial, health, and more) of cooking from scratch.

Some general ideas I've found from many sources, that I wish I'd known when starting:
- choose just a few dishes at first, make them a few times a week until you've experimented a lot and gotten a handle on them; repeat with a few more new ones, and so on; I tried to learn too many too fast
- plan menus based on what is on sale, and what is on hand
- make extra and freeze for future meals, especially for the times I screw up worst
- sauces can rehab some of my disasters, aioli (garlic) sauce is good and intense, salvaged a meat loaf last week that was too bland
- herbs and spices make all the difference; expensive, but can be found at the dollar stores; wish I'd started there to find all basics, and added the less-common when I found a good price; spent way too much and didn't even have all the basics!
- saving veg scraps and bones in the freezer til I'm ready to make stock has been a great habit to learn
- also use water from cooking rice, veg, potatoes, etc. in the stock
- depression-type recipes can be made by altering a modern casserole recipe, use less meat and other high-cost protein, and add more filler (eggs, pasta, bread crumbs, rice, beans) and more herbs/spices; some of my comfort-food recipes, modified this way, taste great and cost less, and are still comforting

Old-fashioned cooking is consistently saving me money while also doing me a lot of good mentally. Creating, knowing I can make some awesome things, trying them on the campfire, all gives greater confidence, and it's relaxing when I find my best methods.

On-line searches brought up a lot of recipes in addition to what I found in old cookbooks, expanding my collection of high protein, low cost dishes, from many cultures, used in hard times. Hungarian egg casserole, a peasant's pasta dish, shepherd's pie and more add variety to the American standards.

Hope it goes great for you -- your enthusiasm will surely help!
Old 02-04-2011, 09:46 PM
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My method ,
make fire ,
put meat on stick,
hold over fire ,
cook till stop screeming,
eat ,
second resipe,
catch fish ,
remove innerds ,
eat.
I'm really easy to please.
Bout the only thing I just can't considder food is eggplant .
If you search for ethnic dishes , check out some of the european dishes on line , really interesting stuff .
I'm always game for something new.
Old 02-04-2011, 10:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Patriot View Post
I did the search function but didn't get any hits, so if this has been posted before or recently, my apologies in advance. I am trying to learn how to cook...something more advanced, and healthier than hamburger helper. I want to learn how to cook the way my grandmother did, before everything was microwaveable. I suppose depression style cooking, making a little feed more mouths on a budget. I would like to get some advice on some cook books. I am wondering if it would not be healthier to bake our own bread,make meat loaves, ect. Any help would be appreciated. TP
I listened to my father's tales of how my grandmother cooked for the family. I think she worked the hardest.

She got up around 4am and stoked the oven with fresh wood, fulled the hot water resivoir on the stove and started punching down the bread dough she made the night before (she baked fresh bread daily) after the coffee was put on the stove to boil she would collect the eggs for breakfast and put the ham or bacon on the stove to fry. By this time the dough had proofed and the loaves were in the oven. She would fry the eggs and pull the bread out to cool. One loaf would be sliced for breakfast, after it cooled enough to slice, and another loaf would be cut for lunch she would make sanwiches with left-over roast beef or meatloaf or whatever they had for supper the night before she would also wrap up the last slices of pie from the night before for the lunch sack.

By 6:30 breakfast was doen dad and his brothers and sisters were off to school (or work as dad was the youngest) and Grandpa was off to one of his many jobs. (when Grandpa was not working he was tending his garden hunting or fishing for meat on the table.

Grandma would spend the rest of the day gathering and cleaning veggies and preparing supper. On weekends during harvest time and through out the summer they would can veggies they grew and in the fall and winter they would can duck and phesant. They bought 50 bound bag of flour and went through 4 bags in a week (they had a large family). Grandma made everything from scratch Pies, cakes cookies, bread, bisquits, noodles....etc. She cooked day and night and the family chopped wood for the stove which was always burning wood all day long.
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