Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > Survival & Preparedness Forum > DIY - Do It Yourself
Articles Chat Room Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files



Advertise Here
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-13-2011, 10:58 AM
corndogggy's Avatar
corndogggy corndogggy is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 7,423
Thanks: 230
Thanked 4,650 Times in 2,547 Posts
Default DIY under-house support???



Advertise Here

So I have a load bearing wall that was set right in between two floor joists, and going in the same direction. It busted the subflooring and has been a rounded V shape but has been stable for the 12 years we've been here. It got a little worse last spring when my house had a humidity problem which made the wood warp after it swelled up with water while having a load on it.

I got a quote for $3,000 to fix it or at least stabilize it. Basically a beam would be put in between those joists under the house, and jack stands on 2'x2' concrete pads would push up on it.

So is this something I can do myself? The material should be very cheap, but I'm not sure about pouring concrete pads under the house, or where to get the jack stands, or how to jack up the beam before putting in the stands.

I'm assuming I can't do it, but it's alot of money so I had to ask.
Old 01-13-2011, 12:37 PM
kmech kmech is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 369
Thanks: 20
Thanked 320 Times in 141 Posts
Default

For what it's worth, if you don't have any real experience with construction I would leave it to the pros. 3k isn't going to 'completely fix' it. (in my opinion) with parts and labor considering that the subfloor is already damaged. Repaired to stabilize it? yeah, no problem
Old 01-13-2011, 01:28 PM
Rabble's Avatar
Rabble Rabble is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Middle Tennessee
Posts: 1,460
Thanks: 1,170
Thanked 1,154 Times in 499 Posts
Default

I had the exact same problem ten years ago and it cost us $8000 back then to fix! A lot of our cost was because they had to dig and bust (brick house) a new crawl space access in front of the house to get materials to where the problem was. They used railroad ties as a footing down the problem wall, then placed floor jacks with 4x4s on top. If you are strong, healthy and meticulous you can do it yourself. Buy a GOOD laser level. Take lots of readings often.
Old 01-13-2011, 01:44 PM
luckyfasteddie luckyfasteddie is online now
Target Shooter
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 488
Thanks: 135
Thanked 535 Times in 231 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by corndogggy View Post
So I have a load bearing wall that was set right in between two floor joists, and going in the same direction. It busted the subflooring and has been a rounded V shape but has been stable for the 12 years we've been here. It got a little worse last spring when my house had a humidity problem which made the wood warp after it swelled up with water while having a load on it.

I got a quote for $3,000 to fix it or at least stabilize it. Basically a beam would be put in between those joists under the house, and jack stands on 2'x2' concrete pads would push up on it.

So is this something I can do myself? The material should be very cheap, but I'm not sure about pouring concrete pads under the house, or where to get the jack stands, or how to jack up the beam before putting in the stands.

I'm assuming I can't do it, but it's alot of money so I had to ask.
providing you are not a clutz ,you can do it . First a few questions so I can fig out how to tell you to do it .
Basement or crawl space
is floor under this wall concrete, I don't mean the floor it is sitting on I mean the one in the CS or basement
What is above this wall ,2nd floor with living space or attic
What makes it a load bearing wall in your opinion
What size are your floor joists and how far apart are they .
How long are the floor joists
what is your sub floor made of , are there two layers
if the bottom of the wall is sinking down , the top should be pulling away from the ceiling ,is it ?
What is this wall made of : Plaster , sheetrock , paneling
is the basement(if you have one) finished .
or are the floor joist under the wall exposed
Are there any wires or pipes passing thru the floor joists in this area
Have you had a termite inspection done , if not get one .
it could be termites .
Answer these questions accuratly and I will tell you what options you have and tools you will need to do the job. I owned a pest control business and never found a carpenter willing to do a repair cheaper than I could do it my self .
Old 01-13-2011, 01:52 PM
WSierra's Avatar
WSierra WSierra is offline
RESET CONGRESS!!
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Midwest
Posts: 9,465
Thanks: 13,489
Thanked 12,413 Times in 4,749 Posts
Default

http://www.easyrack.org/basement-flo...ks-p-1611.html

http://www.ellisok.com/ellisok/products_screwjacks.html
Old 01-13-2011, 04:52 PM
jeepdave's Avatar
jeepdave jeepdave is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Campobello SC
Age: 35
Posts: 51
Thanks: 13
Thanked 37 Times in 21 Posts
Default

You can DIY it, and its not too bad. I would use a steel beam, and some old "house" jacks (bottle jacks) to take the load off the offending beam, cut it out, and replace.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to jeepdave For This Useful Post:
Old 01-13-2011, 05:01 PM
FarmerJohn FarmerJohn is offline
This is a great survival forum
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,299
Thanks: 6,762
Thanked 26,427 Times in 10,443 Posts
Default

we had a similar issue and got a big ibeam and two 2 metal jacks house has been on it for over ten years ill post a pic lil later
Old 01-13-2011, 05:42 PM
corndogggy's Avatar
corndogggy corndogggy is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 7,423
Thanks: 230
Thanked 4,650 Times in 2,547 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by luckyfasteddie View Post
providing you are not a clutz ,you can do it . First a few questions so I can fig out how to tell you to do it .
Basement or crawl space
is floor under this wall concrete, I don't mean the floor it is sitting on I mean the one in the CS or basement
What is above this wall ,2nd floor with living space or attic
What makes it a load bearing wall in your opinion
What size are your floor joists and how far apart are they .
How long are the floor joists
what is your sub floor made of , are there two layers
if the bottom of the wall is sinking down , the top should be pulling away from the ceiling ,is it ?
What is this wall made of : Plaster , sheetrock , paneling
is the basement(if you have one) finished .
or are the floor joist under the wall exposed
Are there any wires or pipes passing thru the floor joists in this area
Have you had a termite inspection done , if not get one .
it could be termites .
Answer these questions accuratly and I will tell you what options you have and tools you will need to do the job. I owned a pest control business and never found a carpenter willing to do a repair cheaper than I could do it my self .
crawl space

floor under the wall is dirt

2nd floor with living space is above it

my living room is 18'x24' with no supports in the middle, but has a second floor above it, and this wall holds up half of it, the other half is attached to my exterior wall

floor joists are 24' long on 16" centers


sub floor made out of plywood and particle board on top

bottom of wall is sinking down and the area around the top is sagging. it's not pulling away from the ceiling because this wall holds that ceiling up, the entire ceiling is sagging.

wall is made of 2x4's covered in cedar

floor joists are exposed under house

no wires or pipes that I'm aware of

currently under orkin termite protection, but it's clearly busted from weight
Old 01-13-2011, 05:44 PM
corndogggy's Avatar
corndogggy corndogggy is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 7,423
Thanks: 230
Thanked 4,650 Times in 2,547 Posts
Default

Ah, that's what I was looking for! These were mentioned in my quote but they were just called jack stands, which never turned up these in my searches.

I figure if I put a 6x6 beam with these under it, I'm good. I am concerned about the concrete though, I'm not sure what kind of pad to use. I figured I had to dig a 2'x2' square that's 2' deep and fill it with concrete, mixed up on the spot under the house. Not sure what else to do.

If I can figure out how to get the concrete pads, a 6x6 and some of these should do the trick.
Old 01-13-2011, 05:47 PM
corndogggy's Avatar
corndogggy corndogggy is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 7,423
Thanks: 230
Thanked 4,650 Times in 2,547 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kmech View Post
3k isn't going to 'completely fix' it. (in my opinion) with parts and labor considering that the subfloor is already damaged. Repaired to stabilize it? yeah, no problem
Yeah I know, and since it won't be completely fixed and only stabilized, i figured I could probably stabilize it myself, since it hasn't really gotten worse in 12 years except when this humidity issue kicked in, then a nearby door frame tilted a quarter inch and the ceiling sagged a little more.
Old 01-13-2011, 06:50 PM
luckyfasteddie luckyfasteddie is online now
Target Shooter
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 488
Thanks: 135
Thanked 535 Times in 231 Posts
Default

Are your floor joists 18 ' or 24 ' long ? what size are they, like 2x12 or 2x14
do the second floor joists run the same way the 1st floor joists do and what size and length are they .
What is the length and width of your house
Any chance you could post a front and side pic
Old 01-13-2011, 06:55 PM
wpage's Avatar
wpage wpage is offline
Target Shooter
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Jesey Shore
Posts: 461
Thanks: 53
Thanked 296 Times in 157 Posts
Default

You can do it!
The Following User Says Thank You to wpage For This Useful Post:
Old 01-14-2011, 07:56 AM
Illini Warrior's Avatar
Illini Warrior Illini Warrior is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 7,230
Thanks: 24
Thanked 9,314 Times in 3,901 Posts
Default Jacks first then Stands

Just some quick advice ........ post hole some STABLE concrete pads for gear jacks or hydraulic bottle jacks ...... after you raise and level your bearing wall use the permanent stands on separate 2' X 2' STABLE concrete pads

Better to safe than sorry ..... the stands are fairly cheap ....... 6" X 6" pressure treat posts might be a substitute ....... use as many posts as it makes sense ........
Old 01-14-2011, 10:11 AM
woodcricket woodcricket is offline
member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: central florida
Posts: 136
Thanks: 397
Thanked 130 Times in 46 Posts
Default

How much height do you have under the crawlspace(bottom of joist to dirt)? This measurement will determine your options.I agree with previous posts that this repair is not rocket science and safety should be your first concern.I have done these type of repairs many times and it is always a little nerve wracking when you are jacking thousands of pounds and things are creaking and popping right above your head in a tight space,with very little room to scramble.Make sure you have two or three jacks under the beam as you jack,in case one fails or tips,better safe than crushed.Pics would be very helpful, you can PM me with any questions.
The Following User Says Thank You to woodcricket For This Useful Post:
Old 07-08-2011, 02:27 AM
Albert11 Albert11 is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

It would be better if you contact any home improvement guys and get it fixed.If you search in the internet you could find people who do home improvement job, you can contact them through online discuss your problem with them.
Old 07-10-2011, 08:00 PM
Daniel964 Daniel964 is offline
Target Shooter
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 416
Thanks: 424
Thanked 311 Times in 162 Posts
Default

Did you check to see if this is covered under your home owners insurance?
Old 07-10-2011, 10:12 PM
Meat Guy Meat Guy is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Midwest U.S.A.
Posts: 2,201
Thanks: 3,447
Thanked 2,277 Times in 1,142 Posts
Default

I had to do that this spring. I even had to replace the floor joists. If you do it or have a contractor do it, get it done right and you shouldn't have to mess with it again. Fog the crawl space first to kill spiders and bugs before you start in.
Old 07-11-2011, 12:41 AM
Big Blzn's Avatar
Big Blzn Big Blzn is online now
CTP
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 1,524
Thanks: 402
Thanked 1,130 Times in 599 Posts
Default

Do it your self and save the money. There is a chance you get a contractor that shows up and half asses it when you could most likely do just as good or better than a professional and save some money. Or if like me, I tend to over build things and right.

Some thoughts and opinions from the info that you provided.

-Any lumber you use be sure to spend a bit extra and use pressure treated. Extra insurance for termites and not too much more money.

-Concrete pads: I would do a 2'x2' x 4" thich footing. You don't have to dig down to pour the footing. Simply make the forms in the driveway out of 2x4 material. Nothing fancy but make sure you can get them in the entrance of your crawl space. If not, build them in halfs and screw them together under the house. Just be sure the soil that is under the pads is sturdy and not spongy or real soft. Home Depot sell the bagged concrete that is a structural concret mix and cures to 5K psi. You will also want to get #4 (1/2") rebar or even #5 (5/8") and make a rebar cage to set in the form. Basically, if your pad is 2'x2' your cage will be approx 18" square. Personally, I would also add an X to the rebar cage too. Once poured just leave the forms in place. One more thing on the concrete. Comcrete takes 28 days to get to full compressive strength so don't think you can pour concrete pad one day and do the jacking the next. I'd give it at least 2-3 weeks before loading up the psi on the pads.

-Definately use one of the screw jack mentioned above. You may find that after several months you need to go back and hit the jacks with a hammer to tighten them upas the soil can compact a small amount under the load.

-Lumber: a 6x6 is a bit much in my opinion. Depending upon access to the crawl space I would look at going with 4x8's. Remember, the size of lumber used will dictate your spacing of the jacks. The further apart your jacks the bigger the beam. If you have a 24' span then you ,ay be looking at 4-5 screw jacks and equivalent # of concrete pads.

-One extra thing I would do is not replace the sagging floor joists but once the every thing is jacked up and the screw jacks are in place I would get the same sized lumber as the joists you currently have and sister them up. Google "sistering floor joists how to". Basically, in your driveway, look down the length of any 2x lumber and look for the "crown" of the lumber. What younger looking doing is looking down one corner of the 2x10 or whatever lumber you have and look down the length of the wood. You will see an ever so slight curve to the wood. Take a pencil and make an arrow pointing toward the crown or convex of the wood. This way you will know which way the distress joist should be placed. Any span of 2x lumber will sag toma degree. By placing the crown up, over time the lumber will sag and eventually make the lumber go from having a crown to being straight.

-Installing the sistered joists: get a bunch of liquid nails and heavy duty construction screws, take the hydraulic jacks that you used to jack the sagging floor and place them under the sagging joists. Jack the old joist up just a smidge. Appy the new joist with liquid nails and screw them to the old sagging joists. Your sistered joist should be the same lenght as the old omes. For lack of better terms, this acts as a splint for the old joists.

-One more thing. Go buy several of those cheap tyvek painters suits and wear it when under the house. It will keep the dirt off and the bitey scratchy itchy things off your skin.

I have more but will add more later.

This IS something you can do your self so get to it. Good luck.
Old 07-11-2011, 01:05 AM
schutzen schutzen is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 126
Thanks: 3
Thanked 142 Times in 66 Posts
Default

Two items I have not seen mentioned in the posts if you DIY.

1) Make sure your foundation is sufficent. This varies by soil type. In my area, 4"-6" is sufficent because we have hard clay soil. In sandy soil areas or areas were the soil freezes to 16"-24" deep you need more depth.

2) When using your jacks to raise the new support beam up, only raise 1/2" or so per day. Use the jacks to raise the beam to firm contact with the subfloor and then raise 1/2". The next day raise another 1/2" and continue like this until the floor is level. This let's the rest of the structure adjust too. You are less likely to have to patch cracked drywall or broken pipes this way.
Old 07-11-2011, 03:46 PM
Big Blzn's Avatar
Big Blzn Big Blzn is online now
CTP
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 1,524
Thanks: 402
Thanked 1,130 Times in 599 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by schutzen View Post
Two items I have not seen mentioned in the posts if you DIY.

1) Make sure your foundation is sufficent. This varies by soil type. In my area, 4"-6" is sufficent because we have hard clay soil. In sandy soil areas or areas were the soil freezes to 16"-24" deep you need more depth.

2) When using your jacks to raise the new support beam up, only raise 1/2" or so per day. Use the jacks to raise the beam to firm contact with the subfloor and then raise 1/2". The next day raise another 1/2" and continue like this until the floor is level. This let's the rest of the structure adjust too. You are less likely to have to patch cracked drywall or broken pipes this way.
Good point on #2. May not be totally necessary but I would do it this way. IF you do take your time and jack it up over several days don't jack it up and then let all the weight of the structure be placed on the hydraulic jacks only. Many jacks especially the older ones will bleed down in fairly short order, like overnight. Jack it up the 1" or so and put your screw jacks underneath for the support. Repeat the process until you have the height you desire. If you have more that 2" or so to jack then use this method. if not, you can probably get away with jacking it up all the way at one time. In the end you may have some stucco or drywall cracking whatever method you use.

Also, if you need mulitple jacks go to a local mom & pop equipment rental yard to rent them for several days. Will save in the cost of the project.

Another thing. If you decide to do this project yourself then make a build thread out of it. could be very informative for others. Plus we atleast want to see pics of the problem.
Reply

Bookmarks



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
74 House Members & 5 Senators file court brief in support of AZ madcritter General Discussion 7 07-21-2010 10:30 PM
Going To The Game? Support Those Who Support You East Coast Woods Controversial News and Alternative Politics 6 05-05-2010 08:04 PM
White House Announces Its Support For Insurance Antitrust Bill Pragmatist General Discussion 3 02-23-2010 05:14 PM
Show Sgt. Crowely your support - silence support is not enough Semplice Vita Controversial News and Alternative Politics 31 07-25-2009 08:35 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright Kevin Felts 2006 - 2012,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net