Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > Survival & Preparedness Forum > Disaster Preparedness General Discussion
Articles Chat Room Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files



Disaster Preparedness General Discussion Anything Disaster Preparedness or Survival Related

Advertise Here
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-09-2011, 03:00 PM
Ruh Ruh is offline
Government Mole
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 96
Thanks: 114
Thanked 46 Times in 33 Posts
Default How much food (per person, per day) should I focus on obtaining?



Advertise Here

I KNOW this has been asked a gazillion times. Simply because it is probably the most basic question. Unfortunately, I am having a hard time finding it using this search engine. So I am sorry for anyone that I annoy. In fact...if the title alone annoys you I asked that you close the topic out now.

I have tried searching this section using "food per person", "amount of food to store", "how much food to store", and several other variations. Unfortunately the way this search function works it looks for all of those words (except the small or "common" words) within that thread...which results in a lot of what I would call "trash" being returned to me.

I also looked through Google (found http://lds.about.com/library/bl/faq/blcalculator.htm to be helpful except for the water suggestions...said 84gal for my family for a year ). However, I prefer to discuss this topic with people with experience and not read outdated websites that contradict one another and also get more than just "Store X amount". I see people say stock wheat...but I would have no idea what to do with 35 lbs of wheat if I suddenly needed to use it. My mind has always been driven on understanding why I need to do something before just doing it :P.

So in a way my question is a bit more in depth that the title suggests. So, again, if I annoy anyone with this thread I am truly sorry. But I have spent an hour trying to skim through my search attempts and while I am getting a lot of good information on various topics...I am having a hard time answering my own question. Of course the problem could be the specific nature of my question. But basically what I want to know is:

How much food, based on the makeup of my family (and your experience), should I be storing up on (we have no specialzed diatery needs other than the fact that I get a little gassy with any milk other than skim lol).

The makeup of my family:
Me - 26 year old/6'3"~300 lbs muscular build (I could stand to lose a good 20-30 lbs...but I literally am big boned and built on a muscular frame)

My Wife - 25 year old/5'4"~120 lbs petite build. Currently she is ~150, but she is also 7 months pregnant with my son...who we expect to be built like the majority of my other children.

Child 1 - 7 year old/4'6"~90 lbs, built like me. She is in like the 95th percentile for height and weight. She isn't the typical obese kid...she is very active and energetic and just built big like me.

Child 2 - 5 year old/3'9"~45 lbs, built like her mother. She is a twig and eats like a bird. For reference, we have to force her to finish off a pack of those instant oatmeals for breakfast.

Child 3 - 22 month old (I really hate giving toddlers ages in months, but apparently months matter up through 3 years of age...or is it 2?). This one is ~25 lbs and probably around 2' tall. I'm not gonna measure or weigh her right now because I like her best when she is sleeping. But this kid eats more than anyone other than me it seems. I think she is just in a growing spurt. However, she is big and I would say she will be in the mid range between child 1 and 2 as far as body type.

Child 4 - This is the "in utero" child I spoke of before. My current plans are to just add additional water to my wife's "ration" (for lack of a better word) and a slight increase in foods. I am big on breast feeding and push my wife to go as long as she can with all of our kids. So hopefully he would not need "people" foods until after a year. Though, because my kids are so big and she is so small we usually do supplement with formula so that (and water) will also be part of the plan.

We also have pets that we plan on being part of the scenario. Two mediums sized dogs, a cat, a rat, a fish, and two hermit crabs. These are listed in order of importance etc.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Ruh For This Useful Post:
Old 01-09-2011, 03:08 PM
paramilusmc's Avatar
paramilusmc paramilusmc is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Back home in the North
Posts: 5,110
Thanks: 1,488
Thanked 4,362 Times in 2,005 Posts
Default

1500-2000 calorie intake per day. Assuming your obviously working your people/members to sustain your AO and security.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to paramilusmc For This Useful Post:
Old 01-09-2011, 03:38 PM
lanahi lanahi is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Northcentral Idaho
Posts: 4,806
Thanks: 7,362
Thanked 5,838 Times in 2,455 Posts
Default

I find the Emergency Essentials food calculator immensely helpful for listing what you ALREADY have stored. It allows you to fill in the number of people and ages and sex that you are prepping for and calculates how many calories you have for how many days and how much protein, vitamin C, etc. for those days.
http://beprepared.com/article.asp?ai...cd2=1294607410
It is mainly a tool to sell more of their #10 cans, but it is a helpful free service too. You can enter information on grocery store bought cans of food. I takes some time to fill things in but it's good to show you what you already have and how long it would last. Add the unborn baby's rations in by maybe counting it as a one-year-old.

You could use the calculator too for foods you PLAN to store. For instance, check 2-50 pound buckets of rice, 50 pounds of beans, so forth and so on, going through the lists to see what you would be interesting in storing, and let it calculate how many days and nutrients you would have if you stored that amount of different foods.

Probably the best thing is to list everything you buy at the store for a couple of weeks and determine how much of it you would want in a storage plan. Buy a small package of rice or beans and see how much you go through in real servings and keep figuring it out how much you're using now. For a two week period, try to eat as much as possible of foods you would store. Even if you buy milk in the liquid state, how long would powdered milk last you, using that as a guide? No one else can calculate for you what YOUR family would need in a SHTF situation, since each family would be different.

The most important thing is calories per day. You cannot live long on 400 calories a day, no matter how nutritionally balanced your food is. The listed "servings" per can is hogwash if it doesn't supply you with the necessary calories. For this reason, it helps to store many calorie dense foods. But of course you need fat and protein, vitamins and minerals...and salt...so that has to be figured in to your calories per day. In a famine, a large percentage of calories should come as fat. Carbohydrates that are more complex, such as whole wheat, will give energy for longer hours than simple carbs like sugar. But all this is why I like the EE calculator. Handy tool.

Wheat (and a grinder) is one of the best long term foods you can store. There are thousands of recipes around the net for how to use wheat, not only in bread, but for crackers, noodles, cold and hot cereals, puddings, pancakes or other flat breads, sprouts, and many, many other uses for it...the variety possible is endless from just wheat. Same for beans and rice and other foods. Try many of these recipes before SHTF so you already know how to use them and what taste best to you. Then make up menus for two weeks. You can keep repeating these two weeks of menus for a year or more and would only need to repeat a menu twice in one month. This would avoid appetite fatigue, which could be serious in SHTF. Buy the bulk grains and beans and the tools to fix them, and then learn to prepare them into nutritious food before you need to rely on them.
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to lanahi For This Useful Post:
Old 01-09-2011, 03:40 PM
CCSir's Avatar
CCSir CCSir is offline
Livin' the freekin' dream
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 382
Thanks: 975
Thanked 363 Times in 165 Posts
Default

If you are just getting started you have got a long row to hoe bro. Congratulations to you for recognizing the need for preparations.

First, in order to determine how much food you are going to need is going to be based on:
-How many days worth of food do you want to store? (1 week, 1 month, 1 year)
Once you have made this determination you will then need to track a typical weeks worth of food consumption. This is not always as easy as it sounds if you are accustomed to the occasional meal at a local restaurant or two. Once you have an idea of how much food that your family would normally consume in a given week then you can make an assessment of how much food is correct for you and your family. (Sorry but there isn't really any correct answer to your question.)

If you don't want to store wheat or things of that nature then you will need to consider anything that is canned or preserved or things that would require you to simply add water (ex. noodles, rice etc.), but (and this is a biggie) make sure that the food you are stocking up on are things that you and your family would normally eat.

This info. will also work for your pets as well. I have found that regular dry pet food will last quite a bit longer if you have large plastic, reseal-able containers. Depending on how long you are planning on preparing for is going to depend on each pets particular food intake. Pets are much like humans in that some times quickly changing their type of food will effect them in a negative way. Make sure to stock up on what they are already accustomed too.

Hope some of this will help. Good luck.
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to CCSir For This Useful Post:
Old 01-09-2011, 04:00 PM
Mr Bobo Mr Bobo is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: CA or Scotland
Posts: 223
Thanks: 897
Thanked 172 Times in 82 Posts
Default

Here's a useful food storage calculator for the basics http://lds.about.com/library/bl/faq/blcalculator.htm
You can get most of this stuff for a very good price from an Latter Day Saints cannery, as well. Remember to store some canned meats/soups and other things your family like, though; you can survive on just the basics, but it's not pleasant.

Best of luck to you
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Mr Bobo For This Useful Post:
Old 01-09-2011, 04:39 PM
paulsonja paulsonja is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 250
Thanks: 123
Thanked 231 Times in 112 Posts
Default

Rice, beans, wheat, lots of it. You'll need to put it up in 5 gallon pails.

As far as the pets, we keep a couple of bags of dog and cat food (large ones) and will transition to scraps, rice, etc.

The fish is easy enough, I assume a betta, one of those $3 betta bites and you're set for life, the hermit crabs too I assume they sell hermit crab food. If you have 2-3 jars of each you're fine. It will keep the kids happy too. What do rats eat?? Rat pellets? Interestingly enough the pets that are least important are easiest to feed

Water filter is a must--Big Berkey was the single best prep we've bought, our water is wonderful with it.

A grain mill, back to basics is a reasonably priced (about $60) and will grind decent flour.

If you have access to a LDS cannery, they have great prices on dehydrated apples, powdered milk, oatmeal, onions, carrots, wheat etc. I would especially recommend them for powdered milk for your family, it is about 75% cheaper than what you can buy in the stores.

jackie
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to paulsonja For This Useful Post:
Old 01-09-2011, 04:44 PM
slreynolds slreynolds is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: nc
Posts: 136
Thanks: 133
Thanked 135 Times in 42 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lanahi View Post
I find the Emergency Essentials food calculator immensely helpful for listing what you ALREADY have stored. It allows you to fill in the number of people and ages and sex that you are prepping for and calculates how many calories you have for how many days and how much protein, vitamin C, etc. for those days.
Ditto!!!!!
The Following User Says Thank You to slreynolds For This Useful Post:
Old 01-09-2011, 04:51 PM
goose3's Avatar
goose3 goose3 is offline
Capability, not scenarios
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 9,872
Thanks: 24,307
Thanked 24,663 Times in 7,450 Posts
Default

While the big berkey is the cadillac of water filters, you can make your own with the Monolithic filters. Far cheaper and they'll let you dedicate prep money to food and other items. The filter/spigot/sock combo is about $23, add a couple of food-grade buckets and some shipping and you have a berkey-equivalent. I have several of those filters.

To learn: http://www.monolithic.com/stories/a-...g-water-filter

To purchase: http://shop.monolithic.com/products/...ic-drip-filter

Since your children are young, you will need to focus on calcium as a food source or supplement. Dried milk is one good thing to have for that, and you'll want some for cooking purposes anyway.

And get vitamins; I think this is a very overlooked element of prepping, and with your wife pregnant she'll need excellent nutrition, both pre- and post-partum. Early on, if you get a good supply of vitamins, it allows you a bit of leeway in your preps. You may be able to get vitamins w/ a good supply of calcium for your children (mine are older, I have no idea what's in kids' vitamins these days).

Wheat can be used for flour, for cereal, you can even make something called "thermos wheat" where you cook it in a thermos w/ boiling water.

Rice, as you've noted, is tremendously versatile.

Beans are great; rice and beans make a complete meal. But you should also stock spices as you go. Bouillion cubes, dehydrated onion and garlic, peppercorns, other spices as to your taste.

I know that you feel like time is short, but I think you have some. Months, if not a couple years. It can drive you nuts to think about how far you have to go, so let me suggest you also look at from where you've come.

And you've made the most important step: you've figured it out. Congrats, good luck, and keep asking questions as you need to.
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to goose3 For This Useful Post:
Old 01-09-2011, 05:07 PM
ForestBeekeeper's Avatar
ForestBeekeeper ForestBeekeeper is offline
Farmer
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Maine
Posts: 15,878
Thanks: 18,078
Thanked 21,876 Times in 8,909 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Helpful Post 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruh View Post
... How much food (per person, per day) should I focus on obtaining? ...
As much as you consume today.

You / we need to focus on producing as much food as you already consume.

Eat what you store, store what you eat, ...
The Following User Says Thank You to ForestBeekeeper For This Useful Post:
Old 01-09-2011, 05:08 PM
paulsonja paulsonja is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 250
Thanks: 123
Thanked 231 Times in 112 Posts
Default

add to list: popcorn. get a good grinder and you have cornmeal, and kids love popcorn as a snack. Sam's Club sells it pretty cheaply.

Berkeys are expensive but IMO, worth every penny. Stainless steel, easy to clean, high quality, and the ceramic filters last virtually forever. Will create pure water when you need to use formula.

And again, powdered milk. Check out the LDS cannery in your area. If you can access it, it will save you thousands (literally) of dollars.

jackie
The Following User Says Thank You to paulsonja For This Useful Post:
Old 01-09-2011, 06:40 PM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 51
Posts: 48,105
Thanks: 85,892
Thanked 94,923 Times in 31,380 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Since we all tend to eat and store different foods, the best way is probably to calculate calories. Or take any of the many year supply suggestions and divide them by 365. One of the more common suggestions puts it at about 300 lbs grains and 75-100 lbs beans per person per year, along with fats, honey or sugar, and powdered milk. The mormon sites have food storage calculators, as does Emergency Essentials. These are a good way to start planning storage needs.

I'm sorry I can't offer more specifics. I never tried to work it out by the day.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to MikeK For This Useful Post:
Old 01-09-2011, 07:48 PM
Cool Hand's Avatar
Cool Hand Cool Hand is offline
Durkas gonna durk...
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: North Georgia
Age: 41
Posts: 6,434
Thanks: 8,561
Thanked 10,305 Times in 3,776 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Thread 
Total Awards: 1
Default

1500 to 2000 calories is SURVIVAL rations. You eventually will start to go downhill unless you are not working, keeping warm, or playing ranger rick.

ANY kind of exertion to include keeping warm will require close to 3000 calories daily. Plus factor in spoilage, over cooking (till you get good at it), spillage, etc.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Cool Hand For This Useful Post:
Old 01-09-2011, 08:04 PM
Moccasin's Avatar
Moccasin Moccasin is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Somewhere
Posts: 6,872
Thanks: 12,251
Thanked 10,983 Times in 4,324 Posts
Default

No problem about asking basic questions here, we love showing off!

Others have pointed you towards the LDS and Emergency Essentials calculators, and advised to stock what you already eat. That's important, not only so you can easily rotate your food stocks as time goes by, but also so sudden dietary changes don't cause problems. Like the runs. Or finding out too late that the special survival foods you've stockpiled, some members of your family can't eat because of allergies...

Water - the rule of thumb is 1 gallon per person per day. At 5 1/2 family members, plus pets, that would be over 2000 gallons for a year for you, probably closer to 2500 gallons. Hopefully you have easily accessible water supplies...

What to do with wheat - Grind it into flour (you'll need a hand mill for that). Soak it overnight then boil until soft to make a filling (if bland) porridge. Sprout it and add the greens to your meals. Plant it and get back almost a hundredfold...

Don't overlook spices, seasonings and sweets, they can improve your diet greatly.

Hope this helps...
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Moccasin For This Useful Post:
Old 01-09-2011, 08:15 PM
Cryptkeeper's Avatar
Cryptkeeper Cryptkeeper is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 7,078
Thanks: 4,723
Thanked 5,374 Times in 2,715 Posts
Default

basic rule store what you eat ,eat what you store

store as much per day as what you ate yeaterday

for a water filter the best bang for the buck is a sawyers point one it will filter over 1,000,000 gallons. thats more than all the other filters
http://www.sawyer.com/SP180.htm
The Following User Says Thank You to Cryptkeeper For This Useful Post:
Old 01-09-2011, 09:45 PM
Bridgetdaddy Bridgetdaddy is offline
Proverbs 22:3
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: central Maine
Posts: 782
Thanks: 999
Thanked 1,143 Times in 344 Posts
Default

Welcome!!
Don't get overwhelmed, just start small. Work your way up.
The Following User Says Thank You to Bridgetdaddy For This Useful Post:
Old 01-09-2011, 09:51 PM
Kipper Kipper is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 4,344
Thanks: 1,388
Thanked 3,701 Times in 1,726 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cool Hand View Post
1500 to 2000 calories is SURVIVAL rations. You eventually will start to go downhill unless you are not working, keeping warm, or playing ranger rick.

ANY kind of exertion to include keeping warm will require close to 3000 calories daily. Plus factor in spoilage, over cooking (till you get good at it), spillage, etc.
Yeah, when I first read 1500cal per day i thought it was a little low...

3000 sounds about right, + 1gal of water, minimum, per person, per day.

Of course you dont need to store all that water in bottles, just be able to get to it via a rainwater catchment system, creek, river combined with appropriate filters etc...
The Following User Says Thank You to Kipper For This Useful Post:
Old 01-09-2011, 10:23 PM
Lone Star's Avatar
Lone Star Lone Star is offline
Come and Take It!
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Garland, TX
Age: 53
Posts: 11,607
Thanks: 6,273
Thanked 10,242 Times in 4,902 Posts
Default

2000 calories a day per person
The Following User Says Thank You to Lone Star For This Useful Post:
Old 01-10-2011, 02:41 AM
ISS ISS is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 1,002
Thanks: 997
Thanked 1,097 Times in 449 Posts
Default

If I put forth the same type of day I did in Vietnam, we are talking 3000 calories a day and at least a gallon of water a day.

ISS
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to ISS For This Useful Post:
Old 01-10-2011, 04:57 AM
kingsman kingsman is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 587
Thanks: 1
Thanked 603 Times in 255 Posts
Default

The least survivable amount that allows you to keep working is 700 calories.
The Following User Says Thank You to kingsman For This Useful Post:
Old 01-10-2011, 09:03 AM
liebrecht liebrecht is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 961
Thanks: 62
Thanked 1,656 Times in 636 Posts
Default

Maybe I should just sit back and listen as I am a newbie but.....I do have small kids and they are a challenge to store food for<sigh>. Currently Twin 2 only eats PB, eggs, hot dogs, apples, peaches, bananas and canned ravioli. He declines cookies and cakes even. So I have stored a lot of what he eats tho I know this will change......maybe tomorrow<sigh>. Canned tuna is a staple and so is canned chicken.

Being on a limited budget, I have become a pro at knowing how much of what we use per week/month and plan storage that way. I KNOW I use a can of coffee per week so I picked up 52 cans when they had a great sale. Nice to go back a month later and see I saved $5 a can<smile>. Getting a nice 1/2 beef at $2 a pound has my freezers stocked for the whole winter. My long range plan is to can some beef myself but time is my problem.

What you might consider is making a menu plan for how you eat now. Do you use 1# of beef a week or 5? I know we use 5 cans of tuna per week so 18 mos X 5 is my goal for now. We use 1# beef per week so 52# should last a year ( the 350# in the freezer is enough that I have meat to share). Same with pasta, chicken, pork, etc. I build some surplus in as I know the kids will get bigger and eat more<smile>. If Twin 2 swears off PB, we will have enough stored to barter or feed a Third World country<smile>. Hope this helps.

Liebrecht
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to liebrecht For This Useful Post:
Reply

Bookmarks



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
High calory light weight food? How much water per person? FloridaState Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 26 10-11-2010 07:36 AM
single person food list hank2222 Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 1 07-30-2010 04:51 AM
question on obtaining water JoeKan Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 3 04-08-2010 10:21 PM
Obtaining salt and spices countryboy87 Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 31 10-24-2008 02:02 AM
My food prep list, per person per month breakdown jamesandjennie Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 7 05-22-2008 08:35 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright Kevin Felts 2006 - 2012,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net