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Old 12-30-2010, 03:45 PM
TexasSurvivor TexasSurvivor is offline
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Default Pickle jars for canning... Is it safe?



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A while back I made a big pot of chili beans. I made so much I ran out of containers to use. I have many old pickle jars and decided to use several pickle jars. I put the beans in the jars while they were hot and put the lids on. After they cooled off, I put them in the fridge.

My question is, Even though they are not canning jars, will they still work to keep several week or months. When I used them a few days later, it was almost imposible to open the jars, so I know I had a great seal. I think I am strong. I can open most other jars.

So... is it safe? thanks

Carl
Old 12-30-2010, 03:47 PM
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ive read that they are safe to re-use as canning jars.
Old 12-30-2010, 04:12 PM
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You can use them for jam or jelly and could probably get away with things like apple sauce or pickles, but if it's something that would normally require pressure canning, like beans, for instance, you're taking a huge chance. Iow, no, it's not a good idea.

Don't take my word for it, though. There's plenty of reliable info available in books and on line.
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Old 12-30-2010, 04:16 PM
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people have been re-useing glass jars with metal lids (pickle, spaghetti sauce, etc) for years and years. tottaly safe with high acid stuff like pickles, and also worx for water or pressure canning.


experiment now while we are all fat and happy.
Old 12-30-2010, 04:58 PM
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Originally Posted by TexasSurvivor View Post
A while back I made a big pot of chili beans. I made so much I ran out of containers to use. I have many old pickle jars and decided to use several pickle jars. I put the beans in the jars while they were hot and put the lids on. After they cooled off, I put them in the fridge.

My question is, Even though they are not canning jars, will they still work to keep several week or months. When I used them a few days later, it was almost imposible to open the jars, so I know I had a great seal. I think I am strong. I can open most other jars.

So... is it safe? thanks

Carl
The way your wrote this leads me to believe that you did not process the beans you made in a canner (pressure). If this is true, then according to all experts and canning books, those will not be safe to eat past a few weeks in the fridge (maybe a month if your fridge is cold).
Not having seen the jars you used, I can't say with certainty on whether they are safe or not. Many companies have gone to using a thinner glass for the jars they put stuff in and they aren't as stable for recanning in. If you used a jar from pickles you canned yourself, then yes, the jar should be good.
With recycled jars, there is the problem of whether the company used thinner glass, but also how the jar was treated, (this most often happened with mayo jars in the past) people put a knife or spoon in the jar and bang it around trying to get things out and it created hairline cracks. The next issue with reusing a jar is what lid you might use on it. You should not reuse a manufacturers lid. I have heard of people being able to reuse a home canning lid but you can not count on a manufacturers lid keeping your food safe.
Please keep in mind, the reusing of the jar or the lid not being safe is if you are PROCESSING in a canner, not if you are simply storing it in the fridge.
When attempting to reuse a manufactorers jar in processing home preserved foods, consider how thick the glass is, how the jar was treated and if a home canning lid will fit on the jar. Many do. From my experience, water bath canning (pickles and jams) works best. Pressure canning seems to have more jars break.
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Old 12-30-2010, 06:32 PM
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Is it really worth the risk?
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Old 12-30-2010, 06:35 PM
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HerbalPagan I concur with what you said all counts. If you are attempting to reuse commercial produce jars, like say pickle jars they must be hot water sterilized, lids too must be clean and sterilized. Starchy low acid foods such as beans can become toxic if not properly processed in a pressure cooker for long term storage.

Please if you get a chance read the Ball Blue book or the canning section of a big cook book. Another option get a copy of the USDA pamphlet on canning. . . I think it is free.

OK that being said After the SHTF event, several folks are going to do what they can to preserve food for later use, some will die of food poisoning.
You all just read up and know the risks and the successes of processing your own food. F.G.
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Old 12-30-2010, 09:25 PM
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Thanks, I will get a book on proper canning. I will just continue to stock up on more can goods until I learn how to properly can.

Thanks for the info. I knew it may not be safe with re-using the jars. I'll just find another use for the pickle jars!
Old 01-02-2011, 04:40 PM
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this is coming from someone who knows nothing about canning but was reading this to try and learn, if a jar of food was held at the right temp for the propper lenght of time and the seal retained the vacum then surly its pretty much garunteed to be safe, this is a question, not trying to disagree with any one who knows more than me.

i also ask as canning jars in the uk are hard to come by.
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Old 01-04-2011, 02:26 PM
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What you did was you got a good seal on the twist-on lids, thereby sealing in bacterial and mold spores! You did nothing to address the bacteria you let into the jar, so it will slowly grow in the fridge and your food will be bad in about 3-4 weeks.

Most foods need special processing to kill the bacteria in the jar once the lid goes on. A few foods high in sugar, salt, or acid (like jellies, salt pork, jerky, or pickles) merely need a tight lid.

I'm glad you asked before you ended up VERY sick.
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Old 01-04-2011, 03:06 PM
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http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/publication...Home%20Can.pdf

Here is what the USDA has to say - see page 13 and 14 in chapter 1
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Old 01-04-2011, 04:13 PM
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http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/publication...Home%20Can.pdf

Here is what the USDA has to say - see page 13 and 14 in chapter 1
Thanks... I may stick to buying for a while while practicing. That seems like a lot of work. I am sure it will get easier the more I do it!
Old 01-04-2011, 04:34 PM
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this is coming from someone who knows nothing about canning but was reading this to try and learn, if a jar of food was held at the right temp for the propper lenght of time and the seal retained the vacum then surly its pretty much garunteed to be safe, this is a question, not trying to disagree with any one who knows more than me.

i also ask as canning jars in the uk are hard to come by.
Sort of . What you are describing IS canning. The food is placed in sterile jars in hot water, the water is heated to boiling and held there for a certain amount of time. This kills the bacteria and such in the food, sort of pasturizing it, and the boiling liquid in the jars pushes the air out of the jar. When the air is pushed out of the jar, this creates a seal 9airtight seal).
This is water bath canning and is good for jams, some fruit, juices, and pickles and some tomato products. All other foods need to be canned with a pressure canner (not cooker) under high pressure to cook the product and kill the bacteria and such.
The Ball Blue Book of Canning is a great book, everyone should get it. Also, your local Extension Agency should be able to offer you classes, books or pamphlets on the subject. Canning is practical and fun, but you need to learn how to do it safely.
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Old 01-07-2011, 10:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dch View Post
this is coming from someone who knows nothing about canning but was reading this to try and learn, if a jar of food was held at the right temp for the propper lenght of time and the seal retained the vacum then surly its pretty much garunteed to be safe, this is a question, not trying to disagree with any one who knows more than me.

i also ask as canning jars in the uk are hard to come by.
I guarantee the pickle jars he used were not sterile.
That is his problem, he wasn't planning on using them, so they were washed and store in the cabinet, with the lids probably banging around in a drawer.
They will probably last for a few weeks (eat them first!)
Old 01-07-2011, 11:05 PM
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I guarantee the pickle jars he used were not sterile.
That is his problem, he wasn't planning on using them, so they were washed and store in the cabinet, with the lids probably banging around in a drawer.
They will probably last for a few weeks (eat them first!)


Are you watching me with a spy cam? you nailed what I pretty much did! I kinda knew it wasn't right. which was the reason of the OP. I ate them within about two weeks. I didn't get sick. I didn't want to save them for too long. I was almost afraid to eat them.
Old 01-10-2011, 02:29 AM
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Home canning is not really that hard. Just get you a Ball canning guide and a nice canning pressure cooker and a water bath canner and teach yourself. I did just that two years ago and love it. The canned jellies and jams much more tasty then store bought. The pizza sauce is amazing. Luv it. Cheers
Old 01-10-2011, 11:55 AM
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Yeah sterilize but also add a couple of table spoons of bacteria rich(from yogart) whey and no bad bac can start.also lightly salt for the same reason.
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