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Old 12-26-2010, 03:41 PM
meemo meemo is offline
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Default FOOD/SPICE STORAGE longterm



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Curious on what is the best thing to store in my mylar bags and food grade buckets for long term SHTF scenario. I have white rice and pinto beans(5 gal each) If I do wheat or corn, dont i need a mill to process it?? Any ideas would be great. Also spice/sugar/tea/SALT storage suggestions. Whats the shelf life if i do in mylar bags?? Im thinking of long term nnutrient levels too. What can one live on
Old 12-26-2010, 03:49 PM
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Whole spices last longer than ground, so it's always best to buy them that way. They last pretty well in mylar with O2 absorbers. They might lose some of their initial fragrance over time, but when you grind them, you'll find that they retained a lot of it inside their structure. If you buy them from online bulk suppliers, they sometimes come vacuum packed and they last a long time that way also.

I've used 10 year old spices that were just fine. You might need to adjust the quantities, but that's why we taste as we cook anyway.

Also remember that you can grow a lot of your own herbs quite easily. They're usually decorative too, and would make nice landscaping plants.

As for corn and wheat, a grinder definately gives you a lot more options. Grinders don't have to be a huge expense though. Just being able to make fresh pasta that takes almost no time to cook makes them worth their weight in gold.
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Old 12-26-2010, 03:53 PM
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Yes, you'll want a mill. I have the Country Living mill, pricey but worth it. It'll do the large kernels of corn, whereas some other mills may not be able to handle that. If you want to grind corn, make sure ahead of time the mill will do it. Some others have had good success w/ the Wonder Mill Jr. and there are others.

As far as spices, I've put away a lot of dehydrated onion and dehydrated garlic in mylar bags with O2 absorbers, in smallish bags in a 5-gallon bucket.

I've also stored a lot of peppercorns (I like pepper), about a pound and half. You can buy 'em in bulk at places like Sam's. I've also prepped 5 small pepper grinders of the type you can get at Aldi for $1.69, and stored the peppercorns from each in their own mylar bags; I figure there's some barter value there.

I have a lot of other spices, oregano, basil, cayenne pepper, cinnamon, a bunch of others. Smallish packages so I can break them up into different buckets which will eventually let me put them into separate places.

As far as salt and sugar: You dont' need to do much to either of them, they'll store pretty much as-is. Keep 'em wrapped up, and sealed, but O2 absorbers aren't important.

I have my sugar in 5# bags in 5-gallon buckets. I buy my salt in the 4# boxes at Sam's Club, then wrap the boxes in in plastic and duct-tape them.
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Old 12-26-2010, 04:23 PM
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Store all wheat as whole berries in mylar w/absorbers 55-60 deg. I have mine in a mine shaft, root cellar is also good. JT
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Old 12-26-2010, 04:30 PM
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As far as a mill goes, i just bought a back to basics mill from amazon.com. was just under $60 shipped. i have not used it much yet but seems to be well made. I bought this one merely as a starter though. I would like to upgrade to a wondermill jr or something along those lines eventually and then keep this for back-up. I could not beat the price. they advertise that you can use it with wheat, rice and corn. but so far i have only used it for wheat and it works great.



i have rice and corn also and plan on trying them soon.
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Old 12-26-2010, 05:57 PM
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Default Storage

I am new here, and I am curious about storing up food for my family. Things like how many pounds of rice per person for 1 year do I need? What about beans? How many pounds of beans for 1 year per person do I need? there are 10 of us in our family so storing enough for everyone is my goal.

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Old 12-26-2010, 06:06 PM
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Hi Lcmcent,

According to the LDS you need the following per person for one year

300lbs of grains (wheat, rice, oats, etc.)
60lbs of beans
20lbs of fats/oils
75lbs nonfat dry milk
5lbs salt
60lbs sugar/honey
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Old 12-26-2010, 06:10 PM
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Go here and plug in the number of people. The LDS have been doing this for years and have the best handle on what is required.

http://lds.about.com/library/bl/faq/blcalculator.htm
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Old 12-27-2010, 07:56 AM
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How much you need for one person for one year depends on the person. Children's needs are different than adult needs, and each person's caloric needs may be different.

For instance, I have always wondered about the 75 pounds of dried milk per person per year that is the LDS recommendation. That amount of dried milk will produce how much liquid milk? 120 gallons? I don't drink that much milk in a year. But if I had younger kids I was concerned about their getting enough calcium, that might make sense.

The dried milk I've put away is primarily for cooking and baking purposes, not for general drinking.

I also suspect they're a bit high on the sugar and honey.

But if you did nothing but start with their recommendations, you'd be at a good starting point.

One final thing: IMO, one of the earliest and best preps you can make is getting enough multivitamins for each person for a year. You can get away with a somewhat less balanced diet if you make up for it with vitamins. They're not a replacement for a good diet, but having all the RDA in a vitamin form every day will help people's immune systems work their best, and fill in any dietary holes you have remaining.

For most people (me included) it's going to be a while until their food stores are just how they want them; in the meantime, IMO, vitamins are a crucial element in ensuring dietary sufficiency.
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Old 12-27-2010, 08:43 AM
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I've seen recommendations for significantly more salt per person than the 5 lbs that particular Food Storage Calculator shows. Salt is cheap, keeps forever, and can be used for flavoring food, preserving food, attracting wild game, etc.

Emergency Essentials shows 22 g dry of instant non-fat milk makes 1 cup. Their 6-gal SuperPail weighing 29 lbs makes 598 1-cup servings. In addition to a serving providing 25% of the daily recommended calcium it also provides 8 g of protein.
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Old 12-27-2010, 09:04 AM
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You will need more sugar then salt then you think as you will use quite a bit if your canning/preserving food from the garden/hunting etc., vinegar for pickling.

Food storage needs remember that the food calculator is only a guideline you really need to track your useage to get a better idea. Non-food items also need to be tracked.

If you storing for 10 people the figures as a starting point look like this...
Fruit 1757 pounds, vegetables 1757 pounds, grains 2844 pounds, legumes 552 pounds, fats and oils 239 pounds dairy 570 pounds sugars 567 pounds, baking 80 pounds. This is a basic 1 year supply for 8 adults and 3 children.
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Old 12-27-2010, 09:22 AM
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The Apr 2010 Preparedness manual says that 75 lbs of dairy was reduced to 8 lbs in 2002. They also recommend 8 lb of salt.
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Old 12-27-2010, 01:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by patcash View Post
The Apr 2010 Preparedness manual says that 75 lbs of dairy was reduced to 8 lbs in 2002. They also recommend 8 lb of salt.
That seems more reasonable to me, at least for adults. I'm only storing dried milk for cooking, and because I like milk in my coffee.
Old 12-27-2010, 02:04 PM
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The water that the calculator recommends has me a little stumped as well. For 2 people it calls for only 28 gallons for a year.
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Old 12-27-2010, 02:18 PM
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The 28 gallons of water on the calculator for 2 adults is only for 2 weeks. You need way more then that even for 2 people for 2 weeks. I guess what they're saying is after 2 weeks you need a better alternative for a water source then bottled water.

If you think serious long term situation will only last 1 year and then things will be honky dory wonderful and the stores will all reopen then go ahead and store less salt and sugar etc. This figures are only a starting point.

One does need to remember most people here in the the USA eat way more salt and sugar then they realize. At least those who use prepackage foods such as ramen mac and chees, frozen dinners canned soups, hamburger helper, pasta and rice a roni condiments and don't forget the eating out.

When the electric goes out and you shoot a deer or whatever how are you going to preserve that meat? How are you going to can that fruit on the fruit trees and bushes your going to need sugar.

Sugar and salt are also great barter items. Honey has medicinal uses also.

Store what you think is appropriate for you and yours just keep these things in mind.
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Old 12-27-2010, 04:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DetroitMarauder View Post
The water that the calculator recommends has me a little stumped as well. For 2 people it calls for only 28 gallons for a year.
I prefer to use FM 21-76 for water planning. See the table at p. 13-9 of http://www.equipped.com/21-76/ch13.pdf.

At rest in the shade at 25 C, you can get by with about 4 liters of water.
At 40 C doing moderate work (cleaning weapons and equipment), you'll need about 12.5 liters. That doesn't count water for cooking and cleaning. In TX, I plan to use about 3.5 gal/day/person in the summer. In the winter, 2 gal is probably fine.
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