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Old 12-16-2010, 11:03 PM
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Default Do Squirrels Get Worms In The Summer?



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Growing up I was told you can't eat a squirrel killed in the Summer because they are "wormy" that time of the year.

Have any of you heard this before?........Any truth to it?

Thanks.
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Old 12-16-2010, 11:45 PM
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I heard the same about rabbits, or they woul be infested with bugs in their fur.
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Old 12-16-2010, 11:53 PM
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ive heard it about all wild animals

but its more like they may/will have ticks and fleas on them but so will cows,sheep,goats...ect

any animal could have worms. do you think corprate farms care? they will kill it and feed it to us just the same, how are you going to know. lol they will buy the most horrid looking disease ridden, half dead animal hopeing it doesnt die before they get it on the trailer

most of those rumors are started by ppl who havent got a clue. i dought indians only hunted in the winter
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Old 12-17-2010, 12:04 AM
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YES and it isn't pretty..Not sure of the actual percentage&odds but, I&we don't eat summer rats.
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Old 12-17-2010, 12:05 AM
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this may sound gross but you can eat them with the worms as long as it is well cooked
Old 12-17-2010, 12:13 AM
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Used to call them "Wolves". Game biologist say they are there all year just can't see them after it turns cold. Just what I was told,YMMV.
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Old 12-17-2010, 01:29 AM
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Wow, I always thought that was an old tale or a way for my grandfather to get me not to shoot summer squirrels

Thanks guys
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Old 12-17-2010, 05:53 AM
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I took a college course about parasites in dogs because of my job. I learned a lot and I would apply the knowledge to any animal.

This is what I learned in the class, it may not be correct now because I took that class several years ago. It makes sense to me so I will share what I learned.

Worms are present in most any animal, all year round. They are mostly in the digestive tract. Even if you deworm an animal there are eggs inside of cysts in the muscles. When the ones in the digestive tract are killed they release chemicals that cause the cysts to hatch and this is why you reworm a dog two weeks later. However, it is only lightening the load. From what I learned in this class they are never really eliminated.

I don't think time of year matters as long as you thoroughly cook the meat.
Old 12-17-2010, 10:30 AM
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Cook game well. I have never known anyone that has gotten ill from wild game, and my family put a lot of meat on the table that way, in the 'olden days'.

Some tips...

Here are some facts on trichinosis from the Centers for Disease Control and on how to prevent it:

• Hunters should practice good field dressing practices and cook all meat well.

• Cook meat products until the juices run clear or to an internal temp of 170F.

• Freeze pork less than six inches thick for 20 days at 5F to kill any worms.

• Cook wild game meat thoroughly. Freezing wild game meats, unlike freezing pork products, even for long periods of time, may not effectively kill all worms.

• Clean meat grinders thoroughly if you prepare your own ground meats.

• Curing (salting), drying, smoking, or microwaving meat does not consistently kill infective worms.

DFG recommends hunters take the following precautions when field dressing and preparing wild pigs:

• Wear gloves when dressing out hogs and dispose of gloves properly.

• Avoid eating/drinking/smoking while doing so.

• Wear eye protection if there is risk of splashing from blood/other fluids.

• Wear coveralls over clothes or promptly change into fresh clothes after dressing animals.

• Wash hands and equipment thoroughly with hot, soapy water.

• Practice good handling/storage procedures with the meat.

• Properly cook the meat to 170F to kill bacteria, viruses and parasites.
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Old 12-17-2010, 10:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WSierra View Post
Cook game well. I have never known anyone that has gotten ill from wild game, and my family put a lot of meat on the table that way, in the 'olden days'.

Some tips...

Here are some facts on trichinosis from the Centers for Disease Control and on how to prevent it:

• Hunters should practice good field dressing practices and cook all meat well.

• Cook meat products until the juices run clear or to an internal temp of 170F.

• Freeze pork less than six inches thick for 20 days at 5F to kill any worms.

• Cook wild game meat thoroughly. Freezing wild game meats, unlike freezing pork products, even for long periods of time, may not effectively kill all worms.

• Clean meat grinders thoroughly if you prepare your own ground meats.

• Curing (salting), drying, smoking, or microwaving meat does not consistently kill infective worms.

DFG recommends hunters take the following precautions when field dressing and preparing wild pigs:

• Wear gloves when dressing out hogs and dispose of gloves properly.

• Avoid eating/drinking/smoking while doing so.

• Wear eye protection if there is risk of splashing from blood/other fluids.

• Wear coveralls over clothes or promptly change into fresh clothes after dressing animals.

• Wash hands and equipment thoroughly with hot, soapy water.

• Practice good handling/storage procedures with the meat.

• Properly cook the meat to 170F to kill bacteria, viruses and parasites.
so by what your post says the worms and or diseases are past to humans through the blood of the animal?
Old 12-20-2010, 08:43 AM
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In the US, both squirrels and rabbits can be infested with botfly larva in the summer. These form big boils on the skin, and a fly maggot lives in there. Is this the type of "worm" you are referring to? Do not try to squeeze the maggot out, they have hooks all along the outside of them, to keep them in place.

Simply cut out the boil without puncturing it, and you are fine. A botfly larve does not extend into the muscle. Removing the whole skin should also remove the capsule the botfly larva is in. (And you thought my scientific trivia would be useless.)

There are no human botflies in the US. But there are in Mexico and Belize.
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Old 02-05-2011, 07:12 PM
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Default Personal Experience

I have shot and eaten many summer squirrels in Georgia. The previous poster writing about botflies is correct. In the hotter months, both squirrels and rabbits can have these very large parasitic maggots under their skin. I have only seen one or two squirrels with these parasites and they were very gross. However, if you skin the animal and cut out the pocket that the parasite lives in, the meat is fine and good to eat.

I don't have any experience with this condition on rabbits because the season here starts in November.

We call them wools - and they are gross.
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Old 02-05-2011, 07:29 PM
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Default Warbles

I think this is what you are referring to?

http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/1,1607,7...6354--,00.html

Hope this helps?
Old 02-12-2011, 01:58 PM
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Never heard that one. I imagine they would have worms in their guts year around....
Old 02-17-2011, 12:21 PM
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hunt in cold weather, garden in the warm weather.
Old 02-17-2011, 06:58 PM
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That's why it's always been said to never eat raw or under cooked meat....Cook it well to destroy the bad guys......
Old 03-16-2014, 07:20 AM
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They may suggest 170, but I normally cook everything to 180, its my personal preference... In chicken it seams to insure all the blood is cooked out, same for pork. Beef can be 160 to 180, up to the consumer.

EB
Old 03-16-2014, 07:37 AM
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I was told this same nonsense by my dad as a kid. I shot a rabbit in the summer and he wouldn't let me cook it, because it would have worms he said.
Pretty sure the worms are present year round.
Most of the people on Earth have some sort of worm crawling around in them. Not a bad idea to do like our ancestors did and do a general deworming once or twice a year.

Some of the worms you get just from walking barefoot outside, or swimming or wading in a lake or pond. different worms can live in just about every part of you. Liver, muscle, digestive tract, eyeball, brain.

I think much of the unexplained intestinal complaints are caused by worms. (irritable bowel syndrome, colitis, etc )
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Old 03-16-2014, 07:56 AM
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Don't know if it is true ,but a friend of mine that hunts hogs, states that he usually gets his hogs from the orange groves.

He says the hogs from there always eat the oranges and the citric acid in their system keeps them from being infested with bugs and the hogs always have more tender and better tasting (sweeter) meat because of the citric acid.

He says they are nuisance animals and the owners of the groves appreciate when you hunt there (with permission of course).
Old 03-16-2014, 07:57 AM
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The internal temperature of a Squirrel is the same in the winter or summer. Plus, I eat my game cooked. And worms live in the digestive tract -which I do not eat.
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