Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > Firearms and Other Weapons Forum > Firearms General Discussion > Rifle Forum
Articles Chat Room Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files



Advertise Here
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-05-2010, 09:16 PM
Hummer Hummer is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: We seceded first
Posts: 772
Thanks: 139
Thanked 626 Times in 312 Posts
Default Does your 303 Brit Enfield have a bad barrel?



Advertise Here

Just a thought for all you Enfield lovers out there who like to shoot theirs but can’t find cheap ammo and worse yet accurate ammo and if you had it chances are your barrel is not in good enough shape to handle it. Some say to convert to 7.62 NATO but this can be very expensive with just the magazine running 75.00 and bolt head conversion a bunch as well. Here is how to put new life and increased accuracy into those fine old rifles for the least cost.

I did a rather nifty conversion a couple weeks back but first some background. I first heard of it in 1981 timeframe which was this guy wanted to rebarrel a 303 which in and of itself was not that earth shaking at the time as surplus barrels were plentiful however with the import ban on foreign military rifles barrels ten years ago (the politicians are protecting us from such) the cheap surplus barrels have disappeared. Now you are stuck with a dog barrel or you can rebarrel which can be a can of worms.

Now if you want to rebarrel an Enfield you have to buy a commercial barrel and order it special, order a 303 Brit chamber reamer and find a gunsmith who has done Enfield work because they are like honest politicans these days. Also to pay someone to contour it to fit the No 1/No 4 barrel channel and this combo is very hard to find.

Reason I say this is the Enfield is a real bitch to rebarrel as they are not a simple clamp it up in a barrel vice and apply a wrench (that supports the action properly) application because the Enfield barrel has a very fast taper down to smaller diameter right in front of the action. No one makes vice jaws to properly fit the Knox Form.

What is a Knox Form? Enfield barrels are not only tapered drastically in front of the action but they have a flat milled on top of the barrel and the Brit ordnance types had a very exotic fixture to place these in to put barrels on and take them out.

What makes it worse is they are installed incredibly tight! !! Generally figuring the barrel is shot out or ate out from firing cordite ammo and no reason to save it the barrel is clamped in 3 jaw lathe chuck and a small parting tool inserted just in front of the receiver and plunge cut a groove into the old barrel and relieve the tension holding it in action. Thusly you don’t risk warping the action removing the barrel.

Rebarreling is fortunately a much easier affair as the smith simply leaves the new barrel cylinder shaped for a few inches in front of the action like on US rifles which are relatively easy to clamp up to screw on correctly.

OK so much for getting the old barrel off and putting on a new one. Just change the shape of the barrel in front of the action to do away with the Knox Form headache and you are off to the races or are you?

If you are into reloading this will interest you. If you are "store bound" and restricted to what you can find pre loaded then you can't take advantage of the little trick I learned which is RCBS makes a special FL resize die to load 30 cal bullets into 303 cases which in essence sizes the neck smaller. The die is stamped “303 British) and on another area “308”.

The gunsmith who sold me the die had ordered it for a guy back in 70s as he had the brilliant idea of installing a 30 cal barrel (.300X.308) on an Enfield which opened up the available bullets to load in it to several hundred on this barrel but apparently never got around to it.

Not wanting to let a good idea go to waste I took a look at the available 30 cal commercial bullets that are available from Speer, Sierra, Hornady etc and there are plenty not to mention cast bullet molds for many others. Bullets (30 cal) from 110 gr to 220 grain for all kinds of applications are available. On the other hand 303 bullets probably don't exceed 12 available from everyone and as those of us who have tried it 30 cal bullets shot in 303 bores (.303X.311/.312) don't allow for maximum potential as the bullets don’t fill the bore and allow gas to escape past the bullet.

So what is to be done to take advantage of this? First off order a custom 30/303 reamer which I basically did. I found Elliott reamers with floating pilots for 30-40 Krag and 303 Brit and it hit me. Just change the 303 pilot with the Krag (30 cal) pilot and it will fit the replacement 30 cal barrel just fine but I went a step further.

I sent the reamer off and had the big jumbo 303 throat reground to a 30.06 throat so the bullet would be in the rifling as soon as it started to move and not take the big jump and getting yawed before it finds the rifling which is a accuracy killer as well. Now when I load ammo the over all length is .075 shorter which means I now have a barrel that will take many more rounds before it is shot out. For new guys as a rifle is shot the hot gases tend to burn away the barrel just in front of the chamber. When this gets past a certain point the barrel loses accuracy and has to be replaced. Thusly if you have a “short throated” chamber the bullet is set in the case deeper initially and you have that much more barrel to run out before you get to a factory throat.

Before someone jumps up and says "well if you put a 303 round it in, the rifle will blow up" etc etc. A factory 303 round will not chamber as the 303 factory bullet is .003" bigger than the 30.06 throat. Thusly if the rifle is stolen, no one is going to be able to shoot it.

There is another plus to this reamer, rebarrel procedure. I can adjust the headspace tight which I do on a 303 GO Gage and then I finish reaming the chamber using a unfired 303 case inserted till the rim contacts the barrel and then I quit reaming.

Why is this done? If you look at a new 303 case next to a fired 303 case you will see the shoulder on the fired case has become much longer which is OK if you are not going to reload but if you do and you move the shoulder back to original place the brass life is severely shortened. With this chamber the case shoulder is only moved about .002” back on FL sizing and not .035”+ I have seen on military 303 chambers.

On my chamber I stopped reaming when the new case just allowed the bolt to close thusly I now headspace on both the rim and the shoulder which increases my case life I estimate to be about 400% as I have not had a case fail as yet so I don’t actually know the life increase as yet.

There is an even cheaper way to rebarrel and increase the performance of the rifle at the same time and it is called the 306 Confederate Sabre. This is the cheapest conversion I have done and basically I took a standard 30.06 chamber reamer and sent it to Manson Precision Reamers and had him grind the back end down to .454 at the 303 chamber length. Thusly you have a 303 case head and on fireforming you have a 30.06 neck and shoulder. This conversion allows for about six more grains of propellant to be added to the fireformed case.
Now generally when you are talking wildcat chambering you are talking big bucks for the loading dies which run in the $185.00 range last time I looked. Not the 306 Sabre. You simply take a set of used 30.06 dies and chuck them in lathe and cut he bottom of the dies of .170 and you have a FL die for the Sabre. Again you have all the 30 cal bullets to choose from. It also headspaces on the rim and now the 30.06 shoulder. Holds more propellant to let you get higher velocity and has a longer neck to hold the bullet.
This is an ideal conversion for those that find bubbaed rifles (sporterized). You can turn the barrel down to .800 about ten inches in front of the receiver and mount a Weaver 92A sight base right there and a pistol scope or if you have the big bucks a Scout Scope.
If anyone sees such a rifle (No 1 MKIII action with a short thick Winchester target barrel installed on it) it is one I built and it is a stolen rifle. I built it for a good friend about ten years ago and his house was broken into and it was stolen with other guns about three years ago. I keep thinking I am going to run up on this rifle at a gun show or flea market as I know they could not find any ammo to fit it. It is a 30/303 as described above. Also has a Bushnell first generation pistol scope on it. My buddy loved it and killed several coyotes with it and would like to have it back.
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Hummer For This Useful Post:
Old 01-13-2011, 01:27 AM
Kilroy_1917's Avatar
Kilroy_1917 Kilroy_1917 is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

I have considered on many occasions rebarreling an Enfield with a new 308 barrel. There are many good Enfield actions out there that could be "redeemed" with either some wood or a new barrel.

Any recommended gunsmiths in the midwest, or would you take an "order"?
Old 01-13-2011, 09:25 AM
dcliffhanger dcliffhanger is online now
Hunter
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: north KY. the center of the universe
Posts: 1,757
Thanks: 15
Thanked 2,077 Times in 872 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hummer View Post
Just a thought for all you Enfield lovers out there who like to shoot theirs but can’t find cheap ammo and worse yet accurate ammo and if you had it chances are your barrel is not in good enough shape to handle it. Some say to convert to 7.62 NATO but this can be very expensive with just the magazine running 75.00 and bolt head conversion a bunch as well. Here is how to put new life and increased accuracy into those fine old rifles for the least cost.

I did a rather nifty conversion a couple weeks back but first some background. I first heard of it in 1981 timeframe which was this guy wanted to rebarrel a 303 which in and of itself was not that earth shaking at the time as surplus barrels were plentiful however with the import ban on foreign military rifles barrels ten years ago (the politicians are protecting us from such) the cheap surplus barrels have disappeared. Now you are stuck with a dog barrel or you can rebarrel which can be a can of worms.

Now if you want to rebarrel an Enfield you have to buy a commercial barrel and order it special, order a 303 Brit chamber reamer and find a gunsmith who has done Enfield work because they are like honest politicans these days. Also to pay someone to contour it to fit the No 1/No 4 barrel channel and this combo is very hard to find.

Reason I say this is the Enfield is a real bitch to rebarrel as they are not a simple clamp it up in a barrel vice and apply a wrench (that supports the action properly) application because the Enfield barrel has a very fast taper down to smaller diameter right in front of the action. No one makes vice jaws to properly fit the Knox Form.

What is a Knox Form? Enfield barrels are not only tapered drastically in front of the action but they have a flat milled on top of the barrel and the Brit ordnance types had a very exotic fixture to place these in to put barrels on and take them out.

What makes it worse is they are installed incredibly tight! !! Generally figuring the barrel is shot out or ate out from firing cordite ammo and no reason to save it the barrel is clamped in 3 jaw lathe chuck and a small parting tool inserted just in front of the receiver and plunge cut a groove into the old barrel and relieve the tension holding it in action. Thusly you don’t risk warping the action removing the barrel.

Rebarreling is fortunately a much easier affair as the smith simply leaves the new barrel cylinder shaped for a few inches in front of the action like on US rifles which are relatively easy to clamp up to screw on correctly.

OK so much for getting the old barrel off and putting on a new one. Just change the shape of the barrel in front of the action to do away with the Knox Form headache and you are off to the races or are you?

If you are into reloading this will interest you. If you are "store bound" and restricted to what you can find pre loaded then you can't take advantage of the little trick I learned which is RCBS makes a special FL resize die to load 30 cal bullets into 303 cases which in essence sizes the neck smaller. The die is stamped “303 British) and on another area “308”.

The gunsmith who sold me the die had ordered it for a guy back in 70s as he had the brilliant idea of installing a 30 cal barrel (.300X.308) on an Enfield which opened up the available bullets to load in it to several hundred on this barrel but apparently never got around to it.

Not wanting to let a good idea go to waste I took a look at the available 30 cal commercial bullets that are available from Speer, Sierra, Hornady etc and there are plenty not to mention cast bullet molds for many others. Bullets (30 cal) from 110 gr to 220 grain for all kinds of applications are available. On the other hand 303 bullets probably don't exceed 12 available from everyone and as those of us who have tried it 30 cal bullets shot in 303 bores (.303X.311/.312) don't allow for maximum potential as the bullets don’t fill the bore and allow gas to escape past the bullet.

So what is to be done to take advantage of this? First off order a custom 30/303 reamer which I basically did. I found Elliott reamers with floating pilots for 30-40 Krag and 303 Brit and it hit me. Just change the 303 pilot with the Krag (30 cal) pilot and it will fit the replacement 30 cal barrel just fine but I went a step further.

I sent the reamer off and had the big jumbo 303 throat reground to a 30.06 throat so the bullet would be in the rifling as soon as it started to move and not take the big jump and getting yawed before it finds the rifling which is a accuracy killer as well. Now when I load ammo the over all length is .075 shorter which means I now have a barrel that will take many more rounds before it is shot out. For new guys as a rifle is shot the hot gases tend to burn away the barrel just in front of the chamber. When this gets past a certain point the barrel loses accuracy and has to be replaced. Thusly if you have a “short throated” chamber the bullet is set in the case deeper initially and you have that much more barrel to run out before you get to a factory throat.

Before someone jumps up and says "well if you put a 303 round it in, the rifle will blow up" etc etc. A factory 303 round will not chamber as the 303 factory bullet is .003" bigger than the 30.06 throat. Thusly if the rifle is stolen, no one is going to be able to shoot it.

There is another plus to this reamer, rebarrel procedure. I can adjust the headspace tight which I do on a 303 GO Gage and then I finish reaming the chamber using a unfired 303 case inserted till the rim contacts the barrel and then I quit reaming.

Why is this done? If you look at a new 303 case next to a fired 303 case you will see the shoulder on the fired case has become much longer which is OK if you are not going to reload but if you do and you move the shoulder back to original place the brass life is severely shortened. With this chamber the case shoulder is only moved about .002” back on FL sizing and not .035”+ I have seen on military 303 chambers.

On my chamber I stopped reaming when the new case just allowed the bolt to close thusly I now headspace on both the rim and the shoulder which increases my case life I estimate to be about 400% as I have not had a case fail as yet so I don’t actually know the life increase as yet.

There is an even cheaper way to rebarrel and increase the performance of the rifle at the same time and it is called the 306 Confederate Sabre. This is the cheapest conversion I have done and basically I took a standard 30.06 chamber reamer and sent it to Manson Precision Reamers and had him grind the back end down to .454 at the 303 chamber length. Thusly you have a 303 case head and on fireforming you have a 30.06 neck and shoulder. This conversion allows for about six more grains of propellant to be added to the fireformed case.
Now generally when you are talking wildcat chambering you are talking big bucks for the loading dies which run in the $185.00 range last time I looked. Not the 306 Sabre. You simply take a set of used 30.06 dies and chuck them in lathe and cut he bottom of the dies of .170 and you have a FL die for the Sabre. Again you have all the 30 cal bullets to choose from. It also headspaces on the rim and now the 30.06 shoulder. Holds more propellant to let you get higher velocity and has a longer neck to hold the bullet.
This is an ideal conversion for those that find bubbaed rifles (sporterized). You can turn the barrel down to .800 about ten inches in front of the receiver and mount a Weaver 92A sight base right there and a pistol scope or if you have the big bucks a Scout Scope.
If anyone sees such a rifle (No 1 MKIII action with a short thick Winchester target barrel installed on it) it is one I built and it is a stolen rifle. I built it for a good friend about ten years ago and his house was broken into and it was stolen with other guns about three years ago. I keep thinking I am going to run up on this rifle at a gun show or flea market as I know they could not find any ammo to fit it. It is a 30/303 as described above. Also has a Bushnell first generation pistol scope on it. My buddy loved it and killed several coyotes with it and would like to have it back.
Congratulations! You just spent $1500 and 6 months time on a $100 rifle that is now worth $200.
Old 01-16-2011, 11:35 PM
Hummer Hummer is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: We seceded first
Posts: 772
Thanks: 139
Thanked 626 Times in 312 Posts
Default

Well not exactly that much. Lets see:

Rifle 100.00

30.06 Reamer about 100.00 with base ground down to .454 for about 30.00 so 135.00 for the reamer.

A Douglas barrel blank estimated at 175.00.

Used dies 15.00

But now I have a rifle that will shoot like a 1500.00 one.

Bottom line is if you have a shot out No 4, this is the only way to get it going and with a nice quality barrel to boot as replacement No 4 barrels in new condition disappeared about ten years back.

So you are stuck with a 100.00 job that is good for shooting a 55 gal drum at 300 yards or spend a little (but much less than a Remy 700) and have a rifle that will do well with ten shot mag.
Old 01-18-2011, 11:35 AM
Groovy Mike's Avatar
Groovy Mike Groovy Mike is offline
Immortal
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 1,411
Thanks: 500
Thanked 1,521 Times in 632 Posts
Default

Not sure why you would do this

#1 there are thousands of Ishapore Enfields already chambered in 308.

#2 If you want to reload for your 303 and don't want to buy factory made projectiles, all you need is a .312 bullet mold and sizing die. If your barrel is "shot out" and over sized, just get a .313 or .314 sized mold and sizing die.

#3 If you don't want to cast your own bullets there are millions of military surplus .310 diameter projectiles on the market today that have been pulled from demilled 7.62x54R and 303 british military ammunition for cheap plinking. I bought several thousand at 5 cents each recently.

But to each their own - it sounds like a fun project.
The Following User Says Thank You to Groovy Mike For This Useful Post:
Old 01-20-2011, 09:23 AM
Danger_Mouse Danger_Mouse is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Hocking, Western Australia
Posts: 91
Thanks: 36
Thanked 44 Times in 27 Posts
Default

The ishapore enfields are a bag of crap, you would be better off leading a bayonet charge than trying to shoot someone with one.

My 1916 No1 Mk3 will still take head shots at 300m after I dont know how many thousands of rounds. I reload for my .303 which keeps the cost of ammo down; the accuracy at 100m is more than adequate.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Danger_Mouse For This Useful Post:
Old 01-21-2011, 01:52 PM
Hummer Hummer is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: We seceded first
Posts: 772
Thanks: 139
Thanked 626 Times in 312 Posts
Default

Basically the reason I did it is to enhance the accuracy potential of the rifle and increase the useful life of brass which has become very expensive. The cost of the custom reamer is paid for quickly. Figure 300 rounds at $52.00 per 100 delivered if FL sized in Brit chamber will probably give case separation in as little as 5 shots because of the massive case head swell and forward movement of the shoulder. Thusly in 1500 rounds you could have purchased the custom reamer which should allow closer to 20 loadings per case thusly the 300 rounds expands into 6000 rounds of useful life if you care for your cases.

Next the throat on the 303 even when new is very long and big and bullets take a big jump hunting for the rifling. With my reamer having 30.06 throat it will not cut out nearly what the Brits did on the factory guns.

Yes there are lots of pulled bullets available of questionable quality (accuracy potential) which at some point will become hard to find if not impossible. Chances are much better of getting 308 diameter bullets to reload here.

I don't plan on shooting any milsurp 303 as from what I can determine it is all gone and won't be any more and what was/is available is Berdan primed and corrosive at that. I haven't seen 303 milsurp in gun shows in years. Last I saw was the Greek stuff and it came and went so quick I was only able to get a couple of cartons.

It is kind of like buying a pickemup truck. Make your selection right, and take care of it and it will last 30 years. If you don't take care of it and run no name gas, don't change lubes and generally mistreat it, it is going to have a short life.

At least with a No1 or No 4 you can rebarrel it and give it a new life and properly done a very long one.

Kilroy, sorry I don't do work for others. Send me a PM and I will be glad help you get set up with reamer for the project. I know gunsmiths in midwest and west who I think can help you.
Old 01-21-2011, 02:03 PM
shadowman's Avatar
shadowman shadowman is offline
wolf in sheeps clothing
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: right here
Age: 45
Posts: 245
Thanks: 73
Thanked 366 Times in 121 Posts
Default

I can't tell you exactly how it's done, but I know there is a fairly simple way to convert the .303 to 7.62 x 54r.
Old 01-21-2011, 03:38 PM
solinvictus's Avatar
solinvictus solinvictus is offline
Getting there....
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,229
Thanks: 58
Thanked 891 Times in 396 Posts
Default Ishapore

Quote:
Originally Posted by Danger_Mouse View Post
The ishapore enfields are a bag of crap, you would be better off leading a bayonet charge than trying to shoot someone with one.

My 1916 No1 Mk3 will still take head shots at 300m after I dont know how many thousands of rounds. I reload for my .303 which keeps the cost of ammo down; the accuracy at 100m is more than adequate.
I guess I got a good one because my Ishapore 2A cleaned up nicely under all the rubber-esque gunk and put 7.62 NATO Radway surplus within a 3" group at 100m without the corrective lenses I now need for rifle shooting. Sadly, I wound up trading it and have wanted it back since.

I guess if you get a .303, you do need to invest in learning to properly reload for it. Great round, but unlike 7.62x54R and 7.92 Mauser, it's not plentiful anymore and was only used in BE nations which means the surplus is long gone or useless due to poor storage. When I had a #4 Mk 2, I purchased some of the POF surplus. It may well have been "POS" because it had SERIOUS hangfires. If you reloaded, I imagine you may pull heads and salvage bullets from it because the ammo itself was dirt cheap at the time.
Old 01-21-2011, 06:39 PM
Danger_Mouse Danger_Mouse is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Hocking, Western Australia
Posts: 91
Thanks: 36
Thanked 44 Times in 27 Posts
Default

I had some of the milsurp.303 out of Pakistan a couple of years ago and not only did I get the worst hangfires but it was berden primed, so corrosive. Brass and projis for .303 are not cheap but are easy to find.
Old 01-21-2011, 07:26 PM
sandline sandline is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 2,309
Thanks: 2,642
Thanked 2,453 Times in 1,102 Posts
Default

I love my .303 Enfields but I think I'd make a wall hanger out of that burned out rifle and buy a replacement unit to take its place. I see one or two at shows for 150 bucks or so all the time. Never actually seen one with a bad bore. All of mine are in excellent shape and were all 150 bucks or less.
Old 01-22-2011, 08:20 AM
Hummer Hummer is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: We seceded first
Posts: 772
Thanks: 139
Thanked 626 Times in 312 Posts
Default

Wow, you are lucky. I have seen more bad ones than good.
One was so bad (No 1 MKIII) that shooting it at 50 yards we couldn't hit a 3'X4' foot target. We moved in to 25 yards and shot at a can on the backstop and best I could tell it was printing about a five foot group at 25 yards ! ! ! !

We changed out the barrel chambered as above and it shot like a champ. Guy loved it but it was stolen about two years ago. If you run up on a No 1 MKIII with a 22" Winchester barrel (target weight) and a Bushnell pistol scope mounted forward of the receiver that is it. Get with me or tell the cops. It is on the NCIC as stolen.
Old 01-25-2011, 11:45 PM
sandline sandline is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 2,309
Thanks: 2,642
Thanked 2,453 Times in 1,102 Posts
Default

[QUOTE=Hummer;2321013]Wow, you are lucky. I have seen more bad ones than good.QUOTE]

I wonder if our dry climate makes the difference in our barrels here? More moisture in the air would make for a worse chance for corrosion when using milsurp ammo.
Old 01-26-2011, 07:46 AM
Hummer Hummer is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: We seceded first
Posts: 772
Thanks: 139
Thanked 626 Times in 312 Posts
Default

Yes humidity is a factor for sure but believe me just eyeballing a barrel only tells the worst of the worst. For instance I have a very nice Olympus Series 5 bore scope and I got a SKS a few years ago (at a funeral no less) and it looked like it had a good barrel. I cleaned it and it felt rough so I was thinking copper build up. I ran the borescope down the barrel and the pitting was so bad the chrome was eaten through. Just looking through it, it was fine but the borescope told the tail.

I have shot a goodly amount of corrosive over the years and never had a barrel problem as I scrubbed it with hot soapy water when I came home and oiled the bores.

I still have some. Matter of fact a guy brought me a bandoleer of 06 in 8 rd clips last year and I just packed it away as bad times.

I have read and heard of several guys having hang fires and misfires with 7.62X54 lately. Apparently the Russian stuff doesn't take long term storage well????

Our military ammo in unopened cans has a projected life of 125 years minimum. Opened cans the life drops to estimated 75 years with exposure to air (humidity).

I once bought a 1500 round case of 8MM German army production ammo made in 37 and I had about five misfires in 800 rounds. Our allowable misfire rate is one in a million that is not attributable to the weapon which 99.999% of misfires can generally be traced to the weapon as causing it.

The old GI bore cleaner was very good for corrosive ammo. I found a gallon at a gun show about 25 years ago and laid it in for bad times.

Ed's Red would also be good for protecting bores from corrosive ammo. Are you familiar with it?
Old 01-26-2011, 08:53 PM
0369 0369 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Age: 43
Posts: 86
Thanks: 24
Thanked 47 Times in 32 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dcliffhanger View Post
Congratulations! You just spent $1500 and 6 months time on a $100 rifle that is now worth $200.
It's not the point. I don't consider resale value before purchasing any guns, and I get **** for taking 20 hours to make a part when it would cost $20 to buy it. Once again it's not the point. I'm a gun crank. I get satisfaction from using my abilities and skills more than my wallet. I'm sure the Enfield wasn't put together to sell it and make money, it was built to shoot; what guns are meant for.


0369
The Following User Says Thank You to 0369 For This Useful Post:
Old 01-26-2011, 09:47 PM
Hummer Hummer is offline
Trapper
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: We seceded first
Posts: 772
Thanks: 139
Thanked 626 Times in 312 Posts
Default

369 Amen. I spent about ten hours just turning it down so it would fit the barrel channel without having to remove wood. When I finished I knew I had a barrel that would stay with the best of them and work better with available high quality 308 bullets.

On the one we put on my buddie's gun it was already bubbified so we just opened the channel. Gun shot really well. My buddy would really like to get it back as he liked the Scout style we made it into. He dropped a coyote out his back door with it.
Old 01-27-2011, 10:12 AM
Eagle223usa Eagle223usa is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 16
Thanks: 28
Thanked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Danger_Mouse View Post
The ishapore enfields are a bag of crap, you would be better off leading a bayonet charge than trying to shoot someone with one.

My 1916 No1 Mk3 will still take head shots at 300m after I dont know how many thousands of rounds. I reload for my .303 which keeps the cost of ammo down; the accuracy at 100m is more than adequate.
I had one that shot very well, traded it though. I find the OP's article intriging, probably because I have an Enfield with a bad barrell on the rack as a decoration. Now to find a smith to go on this "quest".
Old 02-05-2011, 08:26 AM
53convert 53convert is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 3,699
Thanks: 2,054
Thanked 3,516 Times in 1,802 Posts
Default

Love my 303's.
Got one #4mk1 the barrel is well beyond useful life..........I did find a new barrell for it.............but cant find any gunnies around here willing to tackle for the reasons mentioned in the OP..No proper barrel wrench............

But maybe some day.
Reply

Bookmarks



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
this Brit gets it right American Chestnut General Discussion 2 11-05-2010 09:16 AM
EVO vs Brit Army Yorkshire Boy Vehicles & Transportation 7 02-03-2010 02:10 PM
Another new Brit Panser New Member Introduction 17 11-09-2009 06:48 AM
reloading 303 brit docco Australia and New Zealand 1 08-19-2009 05:14 PM
New Brit.. alan New Member Introduction 18 05-20-2009 12:45 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:10 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright Kevin Felts 2006 - 2012,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net