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Old 12-14-2010, 07:30 PM
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Mother Earth news had plans in their weekly email about building a cabin about like that. Looked easy enough. If you have any questions you could just go into home depot and talk to someone there. Or, if at all possible, get a job working construction if there are any jobs to be had. I don't know what kind of welder you are, but it shouldn't be all that difficult to figure out. We used to build and them in when I was in Vo-Tech. It's not all that difficult. Not like the previous poster said, but imagine building a box withing a box so there was airspace on all but the top and front of the part where the fire is, then figure a way to channel the air inside form one side where you have an opening for cold air to come in and out the opposite end where you have an opening for the hot air to get out. That way you have a way to attach it do a blower and some ducting and have a forced air heating system in another part of the structure while keeping some of the radiant heating for the room the furnace is in. Build the whole thing out of 1/4" A36, set it up on 6" long pipe legs. Pretty simple, really. All you need is a cutting torch, a grinder, and an AC buzz box. Put it all together with 6011 and you've got a home heating system. Of course, if it's just you, you could use the back half of the house for cold storage during the winter and leave the airbox design out and just live in the front half of the cabin. YMMV
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Old 12-14-2010, 08:08 PM
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OP: Menards has plans and sell buildings like that....IF you have a sawmill that cuts rough sawn lumber you could put up the shell and use 1"x12" rough sawn lumber..For front porch roof supports you can cut your own trees for support...Also for a great rustic cabin look in a rural setting there is nothing better than rusty steel roofing...Check out www.bridgersteel.com ..I use the corrugated style.....I have built several buildings and currently mainly live in a 170 sq.ft. cabin....Most of all put alot of insulation in the walls and ceiling,even more than you first plan....The best to you.....
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Old 12-14-2010, 11:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bulrush View Post
I'm the kind of person that would like 12 inches of fiberglass insulation (or equivalent) in the walls, and more in the attic. Does your cabin allow for that? How much does it reduce your usable space if you put in insulation?

What about, for the walls, using 6 inches of that pink stiff insulation that comes in boards?

What type of foundation do you put this thing on?
OUTSTANDING
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Old 12-15-2010, 04:28 AM
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I think $6,000 is way too much to spend on a small cabin. One could build something similar but buy cheaper sheets of wood, even salvage good lumber if you can find it.

I salvage lumber and use logs. I know my buildings are sort of "crude" but they all have survived more than ten years of up to 12 foot of snowpack.

And I have never been in debt for a building or anything except for my mtn land which I paid off in 3 years. I hate being in debt.

Here is an interesting link ( not one of my threads ) with lots of pics. In post #18 I show pics with a small nice cabin and a good woodstove.
Lots of others also show pics here > http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=98949
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Old 12-15-2010, 09:53 AM
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I've built site built sheds similar to that one but with concrete floors for between $2kand $2.5k. The concrete alone was $400, and my labor w8as around $800. The cost could be dramatically reduced by sorceing scrap materials from the sawmill and some barn metal for the roof. brand new galvalume roofing is around .60 cents a square foot. I saw a small cast iron stove with two cooking holes for $200 at harbor freight.
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Old 12-15-2010, 11:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by possenti View Post
I've seen some very nice cabins here on this forum since I've joined, and I think it's time to join the club.

I'm planning on living a very minimalist life. I'll be by myself, so I'll only need around 200 sq. ft. There's a dealer in my area that sells the cabin pictured below. I stopped by and checked it out recently, and I think this is the style for me:



The assembled 12X22 ft. model sells for around $6000. I've seriously thought about buying it, but I'd like to build a similar model myself - not just to save money, but for the experience. I'm not much of a construction-type guy, but with the proper plans (and friends) I'd like to go this route.

I've googled "cabin plans" and found nothing remotely close to the model pictured above. Does anyone have any good links where I could find plans for this style cabin? The lofted area is a must, but I don't want to go a full 2-story.

Also, I'm a welder/fabricator by trade, and I'm interested in building my own wood stove. Once again, any type of suitable plans seem non-existent to me on the internet - perhaps because of insurance/liability issues? If this is the case, what type of wood-burning stove would be suitable for a cabin of this size? I'm leaning toward the small Vozelgang (sp?) stove, but I've heard mixed reviews of it.

Thanks in advance for everyone's input.
I have a wood stove that was made 10 years ago we used a lot . In design it is called a shepherds stove because it is small and has an oven .
It became so frail the sheet metal was see through, so I removed all the cast iron and rebuilt it . If you check with antique stores and such they are here and there, but you've got to be quick.
I wish I could post pictures here but oh well.
Just to give you an idea , the dimentions are simple 16X16X22
the fire box ash tray is 7"w X10h 16"d the fire box it's self is about the size of a loaf of bread . I re engineered the oven to set away from the fire box an inch or so and put a damper between the oven and the top to force the heat and smoke below the oven and up the other side . the oven is 9" h 11"w and 16" deep . sence the top was cast iron and had the covers intact I worked with it . One yoke broke and I replaced it with 1/2 " steel plate. It was fun carving the half circles for the covers . I am using it right now , but I have not mounted the lid on just yet . I have some other modifications to play wth , but it does work exactly as I had planned. It's rather a kick to lift a plate next to the fire box and watch the fire go down between the box and the oven.
I had legs from another dead stove so this one has something significantly better than the original.
If your a welder I'm sure you can think it out and buid one easily. One little fact I have proven repeadidly , count on using elbows in your stove pipe.
1. you will have to clean them in the spring any way and it is no big deal .
I use sheet metal screws to secure them together .
2. more importantly , it slows the heat from going up the pipe,better than a damper, and you need a damper any way .
With the stove at full heat 600+ (good hard wood ) damper closed (mid section) ,the temp at the elbow 3' up is just over 150. The temp deterriorates very quickly after that. I can hold my hand on it at the second elbow 14" away from the first.
Because I did not usre the vents the original did I use the ash box door to regulate the air in . later I plan on piping from the floor an air vent and it's own damper. I can completely control this stove and just about shut it down to no flame at all just closing the ash door,and dampering the oven and pipe.
Right now I am working on an idea to use the draft of hot air and smoke, on the far side of the oven to drive a turbine , but it may not have enough lift to actually produce work. Still in the drawing stage . the hope was to provide a convection feature to the oven. It'll come .
Also hoping to add a water tank with all the safety, modern water heating uses . If I have to run the stove it may as well be heating water too.
I figure a bimetal spring on chimney piping can divert the heat to or away from the water heater tank , and use safety valves off of old water heaters, piped below deck. also still on the drawing table.
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Old 12-15-2010, 12:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lildrestl3 View Post
Thats a nice cabin for 6000 grand.. you have a link?

Right in your neck of the woods is a company that sells outright, or rent to own, with free delivery and setup. Best to buy outright

http://www.classicbuildingsales.com/

3 different syles of cabin/cottages.


You might want to take a look at these guys by me as well.
http://www.baldeaglebarns.com/cabin.html

14 x 14 $3,995
14 x 16 $4,495
14 x 20 $4,995
14 x 24 $5,495
14 x 28 $6,095
14 x 32 $6,695
14 x 36 $7,395
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Old 12-15-2010, 11:20 PM
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Wow! Some of you guys really live in a 12 X 22 cabin? Even in the winter?

I am far too hyper for that I guess. I would feel claustrophobic I am afraid. I built my shed a tad bigger than that and then wonder if I built it big enough. I have thought of wanting to go simpler, but I guess I am not ready for that simple yet.
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Old 12-16-2010, 03:55 AM
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try this link http://cid-835fd5edf0a1158d.photos.l...EDF0A1158D!251
it was posted on another forum. looks like it would be a great project.
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Old 12-16-2010, 04:41 AM
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Harbor freight has wood stove for 149.00 its a vogz. till dec. 30 2010
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Old 12-16-2010, 04:48 AM
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most stores such as Menards and Home Depot have kits available for smaller scale build it yourself projects, they supply the plans, blueprints, the lumber and all other items needed for a package cost. You supply the labor and usually the foundation. they can recommend local contractors for help where you may need it. check it out.
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Old 12-19-2010, 10:40 AM
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There is a stove/oven/roaster in the Jan/Feb issue of Mother Earth News that is fantastic and you can build it yourself for about $300.00. I will be building one in late spring which will be raised up to fit on my rear deck. I cannot believe how efficient that this seems to be. It is all made from firebrick, cinder block and a couple of steel grates, and of course a stove pipe.
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Old 12-19-2010, 10:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigers View Post
Wow! Some of you guys really live in a 12 X 22 cabin? Even in the winter?

I am far too hyper for that I guess. I would feel claustrophobic I am afraid. I built my shed a tad bigger than that and then wonder if I built it big enough. I have thought of wanting to go simpler, but I guess I am not ready for that simple yet.
You can always add on to the existing one you already have. Ususally very simple to configure
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Old 12-20-2010, 02:14 AM
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Do not get that stove from Harbor Freight! The cast iron plates do not fit tightly together resulting in a full draft all the time...can't dampen down the flame!!! You're wood will burn up at full heat in less then two hours from all the air intake. Is saving a couple hundred bucks worth it if you have to get up 3 times a night to put wood on the fire? If money is tight you can easily make a wood burning stove from scratch. Even a 5 gall propane tank will be plenty big for a cabin that size. Small stoves are great because there is always plenty of small hardwood limbs around that will burn all night if your stove has good dampening controls and is sealed up tight. The link below is an exellent design made by a amateur welder. It has many nice features. Check it out!

http://purplesagetradingpost.com/sum...use-stove.html
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Old 12-20-2010, 07:42 AM
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Try searching 'sheds' or 'shed plans' or 'shed kits'. I was checking into it myself and found many of those sites offer small cabin kits and plans as well.
Old 12-25-2010, 01:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aspireonescs View Post
small cabin found this the other day. going to be buying the ebook this week.
Buy his books they are a gold mine of information and pictures. Lamar is a great guy and truly lives a life that I so hope to have once retired from Military.

Great Post.....
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Old 12-28-2010, 08:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darrell Clevenger View Post
Buy his books they are a gold mine of information and pictures. Lamar is a great guy and truly lives a life that I so hope to have once retired from Military.

Great Post.....
Yep. I got his ebooks. Although I plan to do things a little differently, Lamar is a huge inspiration.
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Old 12-31-2010, 12:15 PM
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if your a welder think about something like this :
http://www.tincancabin.com/?p=10#more-10
it was posted here on another site !
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Old 12-31-2010, 01:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemp View Post
Do not get that stove from Harbor Freight! The cast iron plates do not fit tightly together resulting in a full draft all the time...can't dampen down the flame!!! You're wood will burn up at full heat in less then two hours from all the air intake. Is saving a couple hundred bucks worth it if you have to get up 3 times a night to put wood on the fire? If money is tight you can easily make a wood burning stove from scratch. Even a 5 gall propane tank will be plenty big for a cabin that size. Small stoves are great because there is always plenty of small hardwood limbs around that will burn all night if your stove has good dampening controls and is sealed up tight. The link below is an exellent design made by a amateur welder. It has many nice features. Check it out!

http://purplesagetradingpost.com/sum...use-stove.html

thanks for the link that looks like a good one
Old 01-02-2011, 08:33 PM
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Here is my little cabin a friend and I put up 2 years ago this month. It is 20X40 and came in the dry, steel exterior, plummed, insulated and wired in 3 hard weeks and around 12 grand. While it's no castle in the Rockies it's my little piece of Texas Heaven, paid for and just 100 yards through Corp of Engineers land to a protected deep water cove. As I'm not a rocket engineer I drew up the plans on a paper lunch bag, figured it wasn't rocket science.



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