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Old 12-03-2010, 10:45 PM
StormWatch StormWatch is offline
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Default Does anyone know the shelf life of grits?



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I went by the discount grocery tonight. They have 5-lb bags of grits for 1.49. 25 or 50 lbs, mylar-bagged and stored in buckets, would make a nice addition to my preps. They would also give us some breakfast-food variety.

The thing is, the best-by date is now. Has anyone ever stored grits for years and then gone back to taste-test them? If they'll last for at least 5 years from now, I'll stock up. I've heard that cornmeal goes rancid quickly--what about grits?
Old 12-03-2010, 11:06 PM
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Grits will have about the same shelf life as corn meal. It stores really well with O2 absorbers though. But I generally get a couple years out of it on the shelf, easy.
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Old 12-04-2010, 04:34 AM
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I had some that sat on the shelf for years in the paper bag. 3 yrs past expiration. It absorbed some flavor. Still good, just add bacon cheese
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Old 12-04-2010, 08:22 AM
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bacon cheese shrimp or honey -- all good additives.. and grits last forever if sealed and properly prepared
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Old 12-04-2010, 09:37 AM
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I wanted to store cornmeal too, ran into the same long-term storage issues as noted above.

Then MikeK suggested this: store popcorn, and grind it to make your own. Stores a long time (mine is in buckets in mylar bags w/ O2 absorbers), and can still be used for, well, popcorn if you want.

You need a mill or grinder that will process it. I bought the Country Living grain mill w/ the bean augur specifically so I would be able to process popcorn for corn meal. (Yeah, my bank account is still crying).

Last time I looked, I could get a 50# bag of popcorn at Sam's Club for about $17.
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Old 12-04-2010, 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by goose3 View Post
I wanted to store cornmeal too, ran into the same long-term storage issues as noted above.

Then MikeK suggested this: store popcorn, and grind it to make your own. Stores a long time (mine is in buckets in mylar bags w/ O2 absorbers), and can still be used for, well, popcorn if you want.

You need a mill or grinder that will process it. I bought the Country Living grain mill w/ the bean augur specifically so I would be able to process popcorn for corn meal. (Yeah, my bank account is still crying).

Last time I looked, I could get a 50# bag of popcorn at Sam's Club for about $17.
I do have some popcorn, and plan to get more, but I thought grits were processed differently than corn meal. I suppose I could always plan to alternate oats, cornmeal mush, and cream of wheat for breakfast foods. And lots of brown sugar.
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Old 12-04-2010, 12:44 PM
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Ok confession time here... Please tell me what the He!! are Grits??? they do not sound very appealing and we do not have them over here, or if we do they are called something else. Have heard mention of them numerous times but really have no idea.
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Old 12-04-2010, 12:55 PM
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Ok confession time here... Please tell me what the He!! are Grits??? they do not sound very appealing and we do not have them over here, or if we do they are called something else. Have heard mention of them numerous times but really have no idea.
ground corn hominy. relatively bland flavor, and more common in the southern states. good grits are quite tasty though with some added flavor item like shrimp or bacon. not always, but usually eaten as a breakfast side item.
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Old 12-04-2010, 12:59 PM
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I do have some popcorn, and plan to get more, but I thought grits were processed differently than corn meal. I suppose I could always plan to alternate oats, cornmeal mush, and cream of wheat for breakfast foods. And lots of brown sugar.
Grits are made from dried hominy rather than dried corn. Hominy has more niacin because the process of making it frees it up for use. Where corn has it bound up and it can't be absorbed by our bodies. But there are a lot of other sources of niacin.

I grind popcorn then sift it. What comes through the sifter is corn meal. What's left is grits and hulls. When you want grits/mush, just give them a rinse and the hulls float away. They make some delicious tasting grits/mush too. Also makes good polenta.
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Old 12-04-2010, 01:02 PM
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I live in Alabama, never heard of shrimp and grits...Where ya'll from? Salt pepper cheese ham bacon, am I missing anything? Yankees like to put sugar honey syrup in it.
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Old 12-04-2010, 01:24 PM
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Yankee's eat grits?

Can't even find them around here. Not in the grocery store (not even the ethnic section) or any restaurant.

Cream of wheat, oatmeal, maybe. Corn flakes is the closest thing here for breakfast in the corn type grains. Can't even find good corn bread, except at black owned and run restaurants.
Old 12-04-2010, 02:27 PM
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I live in the Northeast and we have grits right in our grocery stores.... Maine Shrimp (little ones) and Grits is something my oldest stepsonn introduced me to.... it is ok, but not my favorite. I prefer my grits sweetened with either honey or syrup or even just plain old white granulated sugar.

Our grocery store also sells small (1lb) bags of both white and yellow corn meal in with the normal baking goods.
Old 12-04-2010, 03:38 PM
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Yankee's eat grits?
Yep, but they sugar them up like they do their beans, their cornbread, and everything else. I'm surprised there hasn't been a second civil war over sweet cornbread. Down here, that's sacrilegious!
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Old 12-04-2010, 03:42 PM
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Grits are a basic starch item. Starches don't usually go bad, and, if they do, they will do for sizing paper and several other chemical tricks. Go for it....
Old 12-05-2010, 04:00 PM
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Thank you for the explanation.. ummm what is hominy??? Do get the general idea though.. cornflour with roughage...
Old 12-05-2010, 04:06 PM
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Thank you for the explanation.. ummm what is hominy??? Do get the general idea though.. cornflour with roughage...
and it does taste good....... how ever you decide to prepare it........ try it before you store it though cause why store it if you dont like it...?
Old 12-05-2010, 04:18 PM
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Thank you for the explanation.. ummm what is hominy??? Do get the general idea though.. cornflour with roughage...
Hominy is corn processed with an alkali. It makes it easier to remove the hull from the corn. I assume that's what got it started back in the old days. But it also has the side benefit of freeing up the bound niacin so that it's available to our bodies. Corn has a fair amount of niacin, but we can't absorb it without it being treated first. Cultures that depended on corn as a staple food either processed it or suffered pellagra like some of our early settlers did, who didn't know to process it first.

The process is very labor and fuel intensive though. So to me, it's just better to get niacin from other sources. It's not a rare vitamin.

Hominy tends to be larger kernals than regular corn. It has a somewhat chewy consistency and a neutral flavor. A lot of hispanic cultures use it in stews and such. They also mash it into a dough like consistency to make tortillas and tamales. Dried hominy is coursely ground to make grits. Grits are a lot like polenta in texture, but a little blander in flavor.
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Old 12-05-2010, 04:32 PM
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Grits are best served with a stick of butter and sugar right along side a nice New York Strip and fried egg.
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Old 12-05-2010, 04:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
Yep, but they sugar them up like they do their beans, their cornbread, and everything else. I'm surprised there hasn't been a second civil war over sweet cornbread. Down here, that's sacrilegious!
Amen, brother!
The only thing to make this southern cornbread better, is to put some diced onions and jalapenos in it... and throw some shredded cheese on top! Mmmm!

Karl
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Old 12-05-2010, 05:11 PM
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One thing I remember from my 2 days of employment at Waffle House in '96, They keep their grits fresh in a double boiler with a block of butter melted on top to seal them from air. Oh and the hash browns are dehydrated...Bert's chili is 2 hamburger patties , 3 sausage patties, water and chili mix. I quit, they wanted me to get a haircut and shave!!
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