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Old 11-29-2010, 11:07 PM
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cajun777 cajun777 is offline
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Lightbulb Wilderness Survival first Aid kit, please Critique



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Survival First Aid Kit

This is my recently assembled first aid kit. Its meant to be strapped to the outside of my BOB and used primarily in a wilderness setting. I packed my carrier to the brim, but tried to keep it light enough to not affect my pack weight too much

1. Trauma (Major Injury) kit

(10) Quik-clot Combat Gauze Packets
(2) CAT Tourniquet
(10) Suture needles w/ attached thread
(100) Suture Wound Closure Strips
(4) Cinch Tight H Bandages
(2) Israeli Bandages
(2) Grafco 4” 4 yd elastic bandage
White Medical Tape
Captain Dave’s Military Surgical Kit
(2) Nasopharyngeals (one 28 one 30 FR)
(2) SAM Splints, Gray

2. Minor Injury Kit

(100) Band-aids in various sizes
SAM finger splints
Sawyer Exactor Kit
(4) Moleskin sheets
(15) Gauze pads
Aloe Vera

Continuing operations Kit

Hydrogen peroxide
Neosporin anti-bacterial gel
(5)Disposable Rubber (non latex) gloves
Generic Thermometer.
Ibuprofen
Pepto-Bismol pills
Vitamin C tablets
Imodium pills
Benadryl pills
(50) Generic alcohol pads
Hand sanitizer
Rubber non latex tourniquet
Old 11-29-2010, 11:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cajun777 View Post
Survival First Aid Kit

This is my recently assembled first aid kit. Its meant to be strapped to the outside of my BOB and used primarily in a wilderness setting. I packed my carrier to the brim, but tried to keep it light enough to not affect my pack weight too much

1. Trauma (Major Injury) kit

(10) Quik-clot Combat Gauze Packets
(2) CAT Tourniquet
(10) Suture needles w/ attached thread
(100) Suture Wound Closure Strips
(4) Cinch Tight H Bandages
(2) Israeli Bandages
(2) Grafco 4” 4 yd elastic bandage
White Medical Tape
Captain Dave’s Military Surgical Kit
(2) Nasopharyngeals (one 28 one 30 FR)
(2) SAM Splints, Gray

2. Minor Injury Kit

(100) Band-aids in various sizes
SAM finger splints
Sawyer Exactor Kit
(4) Moleskin sheets
(15) Gauze pads
Aloe Vera

Continuing operations Kit

Hydrogen peroxide
Neosporin anti-bacterial gel
(5)Disposable Rubber (non latex) gloves
Generic Thermometer.
Ibuprofen
Pepto-Bismol pills
Vitamin C tablets
Imodium pills
Benadryl pills
(50) Generic alcohol pads
Hand sanitizer
Rubber non latex tourniquet
Wow. Never thought I'd run across someone with a more extensive kit than I had for first aid. How big is your kit? How many people are you trying to keep safe, and for how long?

I'm just a first responder, but I keep similar things in my kit, overall...though not so many of each. I carry...

3 individually sealed gauze rolls
2 Rubber velcro tourniquets
2 suture needles with thread
10 suture wound closing strips
2 Thin Cinch Universal trauma dressing
5 4x4 bandages
1 roll cloth tape
2 ACE bandages
1 SAM splint
1 CPR mask
1 pair scissors
5 packs Water Jel pain relief gel for burns.
~25 band-aids of various sizes
3 Moleskin sheets
Aloe Vera gel
3 pairs of gloves
Petroleum Jelly in small tin
Small bottle of Hydrogen Peroxide
10 Iodine tablets. (Left concentrated, for wound disinfecting.)
Thermometer
Pulse Ox/heartbeat meter in one finger unit.
Immodium
Tylenol
Benadryl tablets
Benadryl Itch-fighting spray
10-15 pieces Werthers hard candy
And last but not least...5 yards of duct tape.

Not an ideal kit, but good enough for what I carry it for. I can deal with minor to moderate wounds, small burns, diarrhea and other gastrointestinal disorders, sprained/broken limbs, drop in blood sugar due to diabetes, et cetera.

I'm not trying to preform surgery..I'm not trained for that, nor qualified. I'm just looking to get over the common injuries I've encountered on the trail for myself and a group of 2-3 more for up to a week. I also carry a 'cot' wrapped around my bedroll...basically a hollow tube of canvas stitched well, that would make an excellent field expedient stretcher should the need come to carry someone out.

If you're trained, more power to you. If not, you might be able to shave a bit of weight here.
Old 11-29-2010, 11:46 PM
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I have to say its a good list but are you trained to use it all?
Old 11-30-2010, 12:06 AM
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on paper, my older (expired) qualifications include CPR certification, First responder certification, and life guard certification. Currently I'm CLS qualified with the USMC. I'm also pretty good friends with my platoon corpsman, who's given me quite a bit of knowledge himself. To top it off my mother is a former ER tech, so knowledge isn't really a problem so much as some lack of practical application (medical gear is too expensive to just play around with). The one thing I'm still perfecting is the art of surgical knot trying as it applies to suturing a wound, but everything else I'm pretty familiar with.
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Old 11-30-2010, 12:12 AM
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on paper, my older (expired) qualifications include CPR certification, First responder certification, and life guard certification. Currently I'm CLS qualified with the USMC. I'm also pretty good friends with my platoon corpsman, who's given me quite a bit of knowledge himself. To top it off my mother is a former ER tech, so knowledge isn't really a problem so much as some lack of practical application (medical gear is too expensive to just play around with). The one thing I'm still perfecting is the art of surgical knot trying as it applies to suturing a wound, but everything else I'm pretty familiar with.
In that case, more power to you. You'll be able to handle more extensive wounds with that kit than I will with mine and for longer periods. Not my choice for lugging around, but it's a free country, everyone can choose what they want to carry.
Old 11-30-2010, 02:11 AM
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I would swap out Hydrogen Peroxide for Betadine 10% Solution

Betadine
1. It kills everything. Viruses, gram negative and gram positive bacteria, fungi and even protozoa. Even iodine-resistant organisms such as cryptosporidium go down with enough contact time.
2. It is versatile: You can use is as a surgical skin prep, a simple topical antiseptic for scratches and abrasions, diluted as an irrigation solution for severe wounds just a few drops with water, a dental irrigant following tooth extraction, and even as a water purification agent for lake or stream water (4 drops per quart of clear water, with a contact time of 30 minutes at room temperature).
3. It stores well, unlike most antibiotics. The manufacture’s published shelf-life is three years at room temperature: in practice, Betadine lasts much longer. So long as free iodine is released, the antiseptic qualities of Betadine remain. This is easily tested by mixing a drop or two of Betadine with a paste of flour and water: if the mixture turns deep purple or blue-black, then free iodine is present, and the Betadine is still effective as an antiseptic.
4. It is cheap. an 8 oz bottle for about $7. Unless you plan to do daily surgeries at home, skip the gallon bottles and buy multiple small bottles that can be unsealed one at a time – this will reduce the chances of contamination and potentially increase shelf life. The hard to find one-ounce bottles are great for pocket kits. Wax around the caps for storage in first aid kits.
5. It is safe. Allergic reactions to iodine or Betadine are rare, and typically no worse than a minor skin rash. The irritant effects can be avoided by ensuring that Betadine doesn’t dry on tender skin, especially in skin folds such as the inside of the thigh or elbow. People with shellfish allergies are in risk catagory.

Betadine when used on open wound should be diluted to speed the healing process.

more info


I would also add Tylenol,or Acetaminophen is used to relieve mild to moderate pain from headaches, muscle aches, menstrual periods, colds and sore throats, toothaches, backaches, and reactions to vaccinations (shots), and to reduce fever. Acetaminophen may also be used to relieve the pain of osteoarthritis (arthritis caused by the breakdown of the lining of the joints). Acetaminophen is in a class of medications called analgesics (pain relievers) and antipyretics (fever reducers). It works by changing the way the body senses pain and by cooling the body.

And Asprin, aspirin is used to reduce fever and to relieve mild to moderate pain from headaches, menstrual periods, arthritis, colds, toothaches, and muscle aches. Nonprescription aspirin is also used to prevent heart attacks in people who have had a heart attack in the past or who have angina (chest pain that occurs when the heart does not get enough oxygen). Nonprescription aspirin is also used to reduce the risk of death in people who are experiencing or who have recently experienced a heart attack. Nonprescription aspirin is also used to prevent ischemic strokes (strokes that occur when a blood clot blocks the flow of blood to the brain) or mini-strokes (strokes that occur when the flow of blood to the brain is blocked for a short time) in people who have had this type of stroke or mini-stroke in the past.

I would add Sudafed,(over the counter version) Pseudoephedrine, is used to relieve nasal congestion caused by colds, allergies, and hay fever. It is also used to temporarily relieve sinus congestion and pressure. Pseudoephedrine will relieve symptoms but will not treat the cause of the symptoms or speed recovery. Pseudoephedrine is in a class of medications called nasal decongestants. It works by causing narrowing of the blood vessels in the nasal passages.

And would consider a anesthetic with all those sutures someone is going to need it.

I would lose the sam finger splints in a pinch you can cut a end off your other SAM splints or tape to another finger.

Your steri-strips (wound closure strips) and Moleskin will be way more effective with Mastisol or some medical grade Loctite which can also be used to close small lacs.

A pair of trauma shears and a couple of cravats.
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Old 11-30-2010, 02:13 AM
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throw in some burn gel.
Old 11-30-2010, 04:35 AM
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Good kit,good comments. Afrin for nose bleeds if anyone is susceptible to them.
Old 11-30-2010, 06:51 AM
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Something many people leave out of a first aid kit is soap.

Yes you have peroxide, but when treating a wound, you want to make sure your hands are clean THEN desanitized. You do not want any debris or other stuff getting into the wounds to risk infection.
Old 11-30-2010, 12:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by realmcgyver View Post
I would swap out Hydrogen Peroxide for Betadine 10% Solution
...
Betadine when used on open wound should be diluted to speed the healing process.
...
I would also add Tylenol,or Acetaminophen is used to relieve mild to moderate pain from headaches, muscle aches, menstrual periods, colds and sore throats, toothaches, backaches, and reactions to vaccinations (shots), and to reduce fever. Acetaminophen may also be used to relieve the pain of osteoarthritis (arthritis caused by the breakdown of the lining of the joints). Acetaminophen is in a class of medications called analgesics (pain relievers) and antipyretics (fever reducers). It works by changing the way the body senses pain and by cooling the body.

And Asprin, aspirin is used to reduce fever and to relieve mild to moderate pain from headaches, menstrual periods, arthritis, colds, toothaches, and muscle aches. Nonprescription aspirin is also used to prevent heart attacks in people who have had a heart attack in the past or who have angina (chest pain that occurs when the heart does not get enough oxygen). Nonprescription aspirin is also used to reduce the risk of death in people who are experiencing or who have recently experienced a heart attack. Nonprescription aspirin is also used to prevent ischemic strokes (strokes that occur when a blood clot blocks the flow of blood to the brain) or mini-strokes (strokes that occur when the flow of blood to the brain is blocked for a short time) in people who have had this type of stroke or mini-stroke in the past.

I would add Sudafed,(over the counter version) Pseudoephedrine, is used to relieve nasal congestion caused by colds, allergies, and hay fever. It is also used to temporarily relieve sinus congestion and pressure. Pseudoephedrine will relieve symptoms but will not treat the cause of the symptoms or speed recovery. Pseudoephedrine is in a class of medications called nasal decongestants. It works by causing narrowing of the blood vessels in the nasal passages.

And would consider a anesthetic with all those sutures someone is going to need it.

I would lose the sam finger splints in a pinch you can cut a end off your other SAM splints or tape to another finger.

Your steri-strips (wound closure strips) and Moleskin will be way more effective with Mastisol or some medical grade Loctite which can also be used to close small lacs.

A pair of trauma shears and a couple of cravats.
Thanks for all the comments, its a great help.

On the betadine, my mother told me the same thing when I showed her the kit. Right now all I can find are the swabs, but I'm gonna trall the internet in the near future to see if I can get some of the pads and solution.

As far as the pain relievers go I choose to go with Ibuprofen cause it seems to last longer than the others, and it acts a mild fever reducer. As for the other meds I'll be sure to look into it.

On anesthetics, in my younger days it consisted of Alcohol, but that's neither here nor there. When I looked into the anesthetics they were all pretty expensive, and pretty fragile for a wilderness kit. If a have to, I plan on tourniqueting the area until the limb loses sensation and then performing the operation. Its a pretty primitive solution, but I figure all pain is transitory anyway.

On the mastisol, hopefully ill be able to get some eventually, but for the quantity you get and the price its seems a little high priced for me at the moment.

Finally, I actually do have some trauma shears, but their pulling duty in my military IFAK at the moment, I'll be sure to transplant them once I no longer need them in the IFAK.
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