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Old 11-09-2010, 11:06 PM
Mr2005 Mr2005 is offline
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Default Freeze drying food



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Does a home food freeze dryer exisst? The only ones I have been able to locate are large commercial machines?
Anyone know of a smaller scale machine?

On a side note, I was looking at my cans of frreze dried food and noticed the food didn't list potassium in the nutritional info. It caught my eye on the can of freeze dried bananas? Anyone know if the freeze dry process alters the nutritional content......my understanding was that it does not.....but where is the potassium?
Old 11-09-2010, 11:34 PM
lanahi lanahi is offline
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Originally Posted by Mr2005 View Post
Does a home food freeze dryer exisst? The only ones I have been able to locate are large commercial machines?
Anyone know of a smaller scale machine?

On a side note, I was looking at my cans of frreze dried food and noticed the food didn't list potassium in the nutritional info. It caught my eye on the can of freeze dried bananas? Anyone know if the freeze dry process alters the nutritional content......my understanding was that it does not.....but where is the potassium?
The large commercial machines are all that exist. It involves a very sudden freezing and drying that isn't possible without expensive technology.

It should preserve ALL the nutrients because of the way it is processed, but the dietary information required for food packaging does not require potassium to be listed. It is a standard list with the various kinds of fats, sugar, carbohydrates, fiber, protein, vitamin A, vitamin C, iron, and calcium...I think that's all packaging states on any food.
Old 11-10-2010, 10:30 AM
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ForestBeekeeper ForestBeekeeper is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr2005 View Post
Does a home food freeze dryer exisst? The only ones I have been able to locate are large commercial machines?
Anyone know of a smaller scale machine?

On a side note, I was looking at my cans of frreze dried food and noticed the food didn't list potassium in the nutritional info. It caught my eye on the can of freeze dried bananas? Anyone know if the freeze dry process alters the nutritional content ...... my understanding was that it does not ..... but where is the potassium?
Yes. Physically smaller machines do exist.

Commercially manufactured machines start at about the size of a washing machine. Used and refurbished start at around $30k.

I have spoken with three distributors and we even had one distributor come by here to visit our homestead.



On the other hand, you can also make your own. But a DIY model will usually be slower.

We have made one from an antique 10-gallon pressure cooker and a vacuum pump. However it does eat up gaskets.

Your ideal DIY freeze-drier would start with a large bell-jar, small enough to fit inside a chest freezer.

I have a few lab catalogs with bell jars, but they are also expensive. Hoping to find a cheap used one somewhere.

We tried using a 55-gallon oil drum once, but the vacuum crunched it like an empty soda can.




Most 'full service' florist shops will have a freeze-drier that you can rent. Or if you know a florist you may be able to work out a deal. We have a florist in our Bible study group, so using a commercial freeze-drier is not entirely uncommon.



Freeze-drying does not subtract any nutrients other than water.
Old 11-10-2010, 11:01 AM
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vicdotcom vicdotcom is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr2005 View Post
Does a home food freeze dryer exisst? The only ones I have been able to locate are large commercial machines?
Anyone know of a smaller scale machine?

On a side note, I was looking at my cans of frreze dried food and noticed the food didn't list potassium in the nutritional info. It caught my eye on the can of freeze dried bananas? Anyone know if the freeze dry process alters the nutritional content......my understanding was that it does not.....but where is the potassium?
The vaccum pump and chamber are the hardesr parts to fabricate. The cost of these parts and the work involed it is more cost effective to get a small unit. I have seen a few in the 5-8k range. But keep your eyes open in the paper or craigslist. I have seen two units sell for about 2-3k for small units from closed businesses. One was a taxidermist and one was a flower shop that sold freeze dried flowers.
Old 11-10-2010, 12:52 PM
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Home freeze drying is a very expensive proposition. Better to just stick to the old fashioned dehydration methods that have been used successfully for thousands of years. Simple, cheap and proven.
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