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Old 11-08-2010, 05:07 PM
Nolan.Sackett Nolan.Sackett is offline
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Default Dry Pasta - Storage life?



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Hey,
I eat a lot of pasta to fuel my weightlifting and am wondering how long this stuff lasts. I'd like to get a big amount of it and just rotate it. Anyone here using dry uncooked pasta for LTS?
Old 11-08-2010, 05:32 PM
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12 to 20 years depending on storage techniques.
Old 11-08-2010, 05:37 PM
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The LDS cannery packs theirs in #10 cans with O2 absorbers and say it will last 30 years.
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Old 11-08-2010, 05:40 PM
Nolan.Sackett Nolan.Sackett is offline
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Wow! Thats a long time. If I were to do it myself what kind of containers do you recommend? I was thinking of storing maybe a years worth. Just keep it in a cool, dry place right?
Old 11-08-2010, 05:42 PM
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I would say 12 to 20 years is quite high. If you store it in a air tight container and in a dry place it will probably last fine for 2-3 years. Unless you pack the pasta with very specific techniques. The problem comes with the technique in which you store it. Moisture is the main problem people have. Leaving the pasta in lets say the box it comes in can breed bacteria which is harmful to you. Also Weevil's can cause problems with dry goods like pasta.


If you live in a humid climate I have heard of people storing pasta in a freezer.
Old 11-08-2010, 05:44 PM
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I store my pasta in mylar, w/ O2 absorbers. I expect to get 20 years storage life from it, but then, it's put away against a rainy day. Or the S hitting TF.

If, however, you eat it a lot and you can rotate, you can keep it plenty long enough in sealed containers until you eat it. A year's worth is easy to store if you don't have to do mylar and O2 absorbers.
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Old 11-08-2010, 06:42 PM
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Vacuum sealer + pasta = 1-2 shelf life.

Keep in mind, this is to get the optimum "freshness" of the product. Pasta sealed like this could last longer in good conditions, but if you're rotating your stock, 1-2 years is plenty really
Old 11-08-2010, 06:49 PM
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Keep it dry, cool, dark, and safe from pests and it'll keep for generations.
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Old 11-08-2010, 08:44 PM
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anyone forced to eat 30 yro food would probably Wish they were dead....

freeze your pasta for 2 weeks....then place in an air tight container...w/ O2 absorbers....should keep well....
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Old 11-08-2010, 08:49 PM
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Heck it'll last a few years just on the shelf if you're in a dry climate. Properly packed, a couple decades easy. It's one of the top storage foods because of long term storage life, availability, and ease of use.
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Old 11-08-2010, 08:51 PM
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thanks i was just wondering about this
Old 11-09-2010, 07:42 AM
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This was great info for the newbie and inexpensive as well as easily accomplished. Great info Thanks again!
Old 11-09-2010, 07:57 AM
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I buy my pasta when it goes on sale and just put it in the box on a shelf in my basement (my basement is dry). Then use it up a pound or two per week. I have used it after it has sat on the shelf for two years with no ill effects and no special storgage techniques. I suspect it was not "fresh" on the shelf when I bught it at the store either....

You are on the right track.

Whenever I find discounted items that we use, I buy all that I can at the discount. Every week the local pharmacy (CVS) has a loss leader in their advertisement. It is usually a commonly used item that is free after rebate. So I have several months worth of soap, shampoo, deoderant, over the counter medicines etc. I buy whatever is free or deeply discounted that week. I haven't paid full retail for toothpaste etc. in years. There is simply no need to. Everything I buy has a threshold price. When the price drops below that threshold, I buy as much as I can. For me that is soup at under 33 cents per can, either of two brands of toilet paper at under 50 cents per roll, pasta at less than 50 cents per pound, beef at under $2 per pound, dog food under 50 cents per pound. This week my local grocery store has angus beef at $1.99 per pound. I plan to buy at least 25 pounds and freeze it until needed. I can use it as roasts, slice it into steaks, cut it into stew chunks, or grind it into burger. Why pay more?
Old 11-09-2010, 11:55 AM
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Pasta will last for many decades if kept dry.

If it is a type of pasta with some content of oils in it, then o@ absorbers would also help.

The usual ingredients of pasta are the same as for hardtack, which lasts for decades so long as it stays dry.

Moisture is the biggest problem with pasta / hardtack bricks.
Old 11-09-2010, 12:10 PM
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Provident living has some of the newer results of storing food long term.
http://providentliving.org/content/d...4104-1,00.html

Wheat 30+
White rice 30+
Corn 30+
Sugar 30+
Pinto beans 30
Rolled oats 30
Pasta 30
Potato flakes 30
Apple slices 30
Non-fat powdered milk 20
Dehydrated carrots 20

I'm assuming this was done with the samples sent in from LDS that had been sitting in houses over the years in #10 cans. for the indivduial results for different types of food sample sent in look here;
http://ndfs.byu.edu/Research/LongTer...odStorage.aspx
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Old 11-09-2010, 12:51 PM
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Don't forget the pasta sauce, guys! If you make your own, prep plenty of tomato products and such.

Also, remember that not all pasta toppings are sauce based. A lot of "condimento" that the Italians put on theirs is really more like a moist stir fry of tasty ingredients. In fact, I often make a spicy stir fry and top pasta with it. It's also a great place to use your dehydrated veggies.
Old 11-09-2010, 01:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stephpd View Post
Provident living has some of the newer results of storing food long term.
http://providentliving.org/content/d...4104-1,00.html

Wheat 30+
White rice 30+
Corn 30+
Sugar 30+
Pinto beans 30
Rolled oats 30
Pasta 30
Potato flakes 30
Apple slices 30
Non-fat powdered milk 20
Dehydrated carrots 20

I'm assuming this was done with the samples sent in from LDS that had been sitting in houses over the years in #10 cans. for the indivduial results for different types of food sample sent in look here;
http://ndfs.byu.edu/Research/LongTer...odStorage.aspx
They've been slowly revising the storage life estimate of dehydrated foods. The initial estimate were extremely conservative and based on the nitrogen flushing technology they used at the time. As more data has come in, they've begun to realize that even with nitrogen flushing, foods were lasting far longer than the initial estimates. With O2 absorbers being even more effective, storage life will be longer yet. But they haven't been out long enough for the long term data to start coming in.

This is what I keep trying to tell the freeze dried folks, who always criticize dehydrated foods for their supposedly shorter lifespans as a way of justifying their own overpriced purchases. Many dehydrated foods last far longer than the estimates. And a large percentage of them, if not the majority, have lifespans that very close to that of freeze dried.

I've proven that to myself by accident. Back in the last 90s I put a large order in the metal storage shed during a move, and with all the other cans and buckets we had, forgot about them. I had assumed that they were part of the food stores we had in the house. A little over a year ago I rediscovered them, and after sitting over 10 years in a metal shed in the hot Texas sun, didn't expect much to be edible. It was a pleasant surprise to find out that for the most part, all of them were in good shape other than a few examples. Such as pancake mix that the baking powder had offgassed in the can due to heat, or tomato powder that had lost some of it's flavor. I'm currently rotating all sorts of those foods. Even dehydrated fruits, which by the old conservative estimates only have an 8-12 year lifespan under optimal conditions, were in very good condition.
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Old 11-09-2010, 01:11 PM
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Thanks for the info guys! Don't worry about the sauce, this may sound strange but I like it just fine plain.
Old 11-09-2010, 01:15 PM
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Funny that I am sitting here reading this thread while eating some pasta from a 3 year old cardboard box. Guess what? It's fine. I have a couple of buckets of it stored away also with mylar / o2 absorbers and I expect it will be good for no less than 10 years.
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Old 11-09-2010, 01:26 PM
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Yeah, I've been reading many of the individual study's done at BYU and much of the food is rated at 80% consumable for emergency situations. They give the fact that some of the cans had seal leaks, but for those that didn't the O2 levels were still very low.

I believe that most of that food was done with the dry ice technique instead of gas purging. Since O2 absorbers and Mylar bags are fairly new to the scene it's hard to say they can last as long, though I'm fairly sure the O2 absorbers would work as well as the dry ice in #10 cans.

The most I've found out about the mylar bags is 5-7 years since it's similar to the retort bags used in MRE's The only other thing is the one report about;

Lloyd MA, Pike OA. 2000. Practicality of foil laminate bags to store dry corn and beans in Kenya. Technical Report submitted to LDS Welfare Services.

No direct link and I haven't found the actual report anywhere on the internet.

************************************************** **********
edit:
What surprised me was the studies on Wheat flour, cornmeal and baking powder. And that when stored properly in a low humidity, low oxygen,low heat environment they found these to be acceptable even at 10 years. (that's as old as what was sent in. It's probably fine for longer periods of time but no samples submitted)
http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/it...ISOBOX=1&REC=6
http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/it...ISOBOX=1&REC=2
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