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Old 07-24-2007, 08:50 AM
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Default List of popular pistol calibers



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I wanted to put together a list of pistol calibers, so here goes. If anything was left out please feel free to add to the list. Some of the information in this article was pulled from wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org


22 Long Rifle: .22 Long is a variety of .22 caliber (5.56 mm) rimfire ammunition. The .22 Long is the second oldest of the surviving rimfire cartridges, dating back to 1871, when it was loaded with a 29 grain (1.9 g) bullet and 5 grains (0.32 g) of black powder, 25% more than the .22 Short it was based on. It was designed for use in revolvers, but was soon chambered in rifles as well. The .22 Long Rifle, a heavier loading of the .22 Long case, appeared in 1887, along with the first smokeless powder loadings of the .22 rimfires. The 22 long rifle is perfectly suited for small game, such as rabbits, squirrels and raccoons. During the great depression, the 22 gained great popularity due to the fact that is was inexpensive. Rural families could use this inexpensive round to hunt small game with.

25 ACP: The .25 ACP (6.35 mm) centerfire pistol cartridge is a semi-rimmed, straight-walled pistol cartridge designed by John Browning in 1906. In modern times, the 25 auto is more of a novelty. Most people will buy either a pistol chambered in 22 long rifle or a 380 instead of a 25.

380 Auto: The .380 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol) (also referred to as the "9mm Short", "9mm Browning", "9 mm Kurz", "9mm Corto", "9x17mm") pistol cartridge is a rimless, straight-walled pistol cartridge developed by firearms designer John Browning. It was introduced in 1908 by Colt, and has been a popular self-defense cartridge ever since. Many police officers opt for a 380 as their back-up pistol. The 380 is also favored for its lite recoil as compared to other pistols.

9 mm Makarov:
The 9x18mm caliber was the standard pistol caliber for Eastern European countries, many of which still use this caliber today. 9x18mm caliber uses a larger diameter bullet than other 9mm rounds. 9mm Parabellum is 9.017mm (0.355 inches), however 9x18mm rounds are loaded with bullets measuring 9.220mm (0.363 inches). As a result, different bullets must be used to load 9x18mm cartridges. The 9x18 bullet is actually slightly larger in diameter than standard 9mm Parabellum.

9mm Luger: The 9mm Parabellum pistol cartridge was introduced in 1902 by the German weapons manufacturer Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) for their Luger pistol. It was a higher-power version of the earlier 7.65mm Luger Parabellum, itself developed from an earlier 7.65mm Borchardt cartridge. During the 1980's the US military started looking at 9mm pistols to replace the 45 acp. The M9 9mm pistol was adopted by the military in the 1980's. It is essentially a mil-spec Beretta 92F, later the 92FS.

38 special: .38 Special is a rimmed, centerfire cartridge designed by Smith & Wesson. It is most commonly used in revolvers, although semi-automatic pistols and some carbines also use this round. The .38 Special was the standard service cartridge of most police departments in the United States from the 1920s to the 1980s. Even though the 38 special has been replaced as a service round, it is still used for target shooting. The round is easy and cost effective to reload.

38 Super Auto The 38 Super was introduced in the late 1920s as a higher pressure loading of the .38 ACP. The old .38 ACP propelled a 130 grain bullet at 1050 feet per second (fps). The improved .38 Super Auto pushed the same 130 grain bullet at 1280 fps. The .38 Super has gained distinction as the caliber of choice for many top pistol match competitors. In overall sales, it lags far behind most other pistol cartridges today.

357 magnum: The .357 Magnum was developed over a period of time in the early to mid-1930s in a direct response to Colt's .38 Super Automatic. This cartridge is regarded by many as an excellent self-defense round; it still enjoys a reputation of being the gold standard of stopping power among handgun cartridges. Guns in .357 Magnum caliber have the advantage of being able to fire .38 Special ammunition, with its lower cost, recoil, noise, muzzle flash, and, often, better accuracy.

357 Sig: SIGARMS, in partnership with Federal Cartridge, developed the 357 SIG cartridge in 1994. Contrary to popular belief, the 357 SIG cartridge is not a .40 S&W case necked down to accept .355 inch bullets. The goal of the 357 SIG project was to offer at least the level of performance of lighter .357 Magnum loads and +P/+P+ 9 mm Luger loads. The 357 SIG accomplishes this goal with a 125-grain (8.1 g) bullet.

40 S&W: The .40 S&W is a rimless cartridge developed jointly by Winchester and Smith & Wesson. The round debuted January 17, 1990. The 40 S&W can fire a 155 gr JHP @ 1140 fps with 432 ft·lbf.

10 mm Auto: The 10 mm Auto is a powerful and versatile cartridge for semi-automatic pistols, developed by ammunition manufacturer FFV Norma AB of Ĺmotfors, Sweden, and introduced in 1983 in the ill-fated Bren Ten pistol.

41 Magnum: In 1963, Elmer Keith and Bill Jordan petitioned Smith & Wesson, Remington, and Norma to produce a revolver and cartridge in this caliber to overcome perceived shortcomings in the extant .357 Magnum and .44 Magnum caliber cartridges. The .41 Magnum has never had the success of either the .357 or .44 Magnum cartridges, but was still prized by some handgunners as a hunting cartridge. For the largest game, though, a .44 Magnum with its ability to use a heavier bullet is still preferred.

44 Magnum: The .44 Magnum cartridge was the result of "souped-up" handloading of the .44 Special. The .44 Special, and other big bore handgun cartridges were being loaded with heavy bullets pushed at higher than normal velocities for better hunting performance. The .44 Magnum case is slightly longer than the .44 Special case, not because of the need for more room for propellant, but to prevent the more powerful cartridge from being chambered in older, weaker .44 Special firearms.

45 ACP: The .45 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol, 11.43 x 23 mm) is a rimless pistol cartridge designed by firearms designer John Browning in 1905, for use in his prototype Colt semi-automatic .45 pistol—a design which evolved into the M1911 pistol adopted by the U.S. Army in 1911. The .45 ACP would become one of the most successful cartridges of all time, among both military and civilian users. It has been used in innumerable handguns and submachine guns (including most famously in the M1911 pistol) since its introduction.

45 Long Colt: The .45 Colt cartridge (known commonly as the ".45 Long Colt ") was developed by the US Army at Frankfort Arsenal in 1872 as an improvement of the British .476 Eley to replace the standard issue Smith and Wesson .44 round in the famous Colt Single Action Army, often known as the Peacemaker single action revolver.

454 Casull: The .454 Casull was, developed in 1957 by **** Casull and Jack Fulmer. It was first announced in November 1959 by Guns and Ammo magazine. The basic design was a lengthened and structurally improved .45 Colt case.

50 AE: The .50 Action Express (AE, 12.7 x 32.6 mm) is a large caliber handgun cartridge. It was developed in 1988 by Evan Whildin of Action Arms. The Magnum Research Desert Eagle was the first handgun chambered for the .50 AE. Among the few commercial handgun cartridges designed that exceed its ballistic performance are the .454 Casull, .460 S&W Magnum and the .500 S&W Magnum.

500 S&W Magnum: The .500 S&W Magnum is a cartridge that was developed by CorBon for Smith & Wesson for use in their Model 500 revolvers and introduced in February 2003 at the SHOT trade show. It is the most powerful handgun cartridge commercially manufactured with over 2500 ft·lbf (3.5 kJ) of energy created with a 440gr bullet travelling at 1625 fps. Some loadings can even achieve muzzle velocities of 2300 fps using a 325 grain bullet. This produces a muzzle energy of over 3817 ft·lbf.
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Old 07-31-2007, 01:59 PM
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If you are going to include Makarov, you might as well include Tokarev. Shhhh... it's the bettah of the two calibers. Oh, and don't forget the round for the FN Five seveN.
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Old 08-03-2007, 07:57 PM
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Might want to include the 45 GAP in there too, it's gaining popularity.
Old 08-03-2007, 09:20 PM
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Might want to include .32 ACP
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Old 08-03-2007, 09:28 PM
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Kev, would you copy/paste these into your post?

5.7 x 28 mm: The 5.7 × 28 mm cartridge is a small caliber cartridge for pistols, submachine guns/personal defense weapons and carbines developed by Fabrique Nationale de Herstal (FN Herstal). The 5.7 × 28 mm rounds are bottlenecked cartridges with .224 inch (5.7 mm) bullets and come in several versions. The 5.7 × 28 mm cartridges have high muzzle velocity and low recoil, and were designed to be more effective against modern body armor when used in pistols, submachine guns, or carbines.

7.62x25 Tokarev: The 7.62x25 Tokarev cartridge is a bottle-necked pistol cartridge widely used in former Soviet and Soviet satellite states. Actual caliber of bullet is 7.85 mm (.309 in).

32 ACP: The .32 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol) pistol cartridge is a semi-rimmed, straight-walled cartridge developed by firearms designer John Browning, for use in semi-automatic pistols. It is also known as the 7.65 x 17 mm Browning or 7.65 Browning. Introduced in 1899 by Fabrique Nationale, the cartridge was first used in the Browning M1900.

45 GAP: The .45 G.A.P. pistol cartridge was designed by Ernest Durham, an engineer with CCI/Speer, at the request of firearms manufacturer Glock to provide a cartridge that would equal the power of the .45 ACP but was shorter to fit in a more compact handgun. G.A.P. is an acronym for "Glock Automatic Pistol", and the .45 G.A.P. is the first commercially-introduced cartridge identified with Glock.

Side-by-side comparison to other cartridges picture below.
From left: 9 mm Luger, 7.62 mm Tokarev, .357 SIG, 10 mm Auto, .40 S&W, .45 GAP, .50 Action Express.
Attached Thumbnails
350px-9mm_7,62mm_357sig_10mm_45SW_45GAP_50AE_002.jpg  

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Old 08-03-2007, 09:57 PM
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32 H&R, 30 Carbine (Ruger single action chambered for it), 460 S&W, 9X23, 45 Super, 460 Rowland, 455 Webly (sp?)...
Old 08-03-2007, 10:21 PM
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.32 H&R Magnum: The .32 H&R Magnum is a rimmed cartridge designed for use in revolvers. It was developed in 1984 as a joint venture between Harrington & Richardson and Federal Cartridge. The .32 H&R Magnum was produced by lengthening the .32 S&W Long case by .155", to 1.075".

.30 Carbine: The .30 Carbine (7.62 x 33 mm) is the cartridge used in the famous M1 Carbine introduced in the 1940s. It is an intermediate round designed to be fired from the M1 carbine's 18-inch (458 mm) barrel. The .460 S&W Magnum round is the highest velocity and most powerful .45 caliber handgun cartridge in production today.

.460 S&W Magnum: The .460 round is a longer, more powerful version of the popular .454 Casull, itself a longer and more powerful version of the .45 Colt. Consequently, weapons that fire .460 are usually capable of firing the less powerful .454 Casull and .45 Colt rounds, but this must be verified with each weapon's manufacturer. The reverse, however, does not apply: .45 Colt and .454 Casull handguns cannot accept .460 rounds. If attempted, explosion and life-threatening injury may occur. The length of the .460 also makes it difficult if not impossible to chamber into smaller handguns. The Smith and Wesson 460XVR and 460V are two revolvers designed to fire the .460 S&W round. Smith and Wesson boast that the .460 is the highest velocity revolver cartridge in the world, firing bullets at 2630 ft/s (750 m/s). The .460 achieves over 2500 ft·lbff (3.25 KJ) of energy by driving a 200 gr bullet at 2330 ft/s but this falls short of the title "most powerful commercial handgun cartridge" as the .500 S&W Magnum drives a 350 grain round at 1975fps at over 3032 ft·lbf. (DoubleTap Ammunition Co.)

.455 Webley: The .455 cartridge was one of the great service revolver cartridges. It was a rimmed cartridge that launched a 265-grain (17.2 g) .45 bullet at the relatively low velocity of 620 ft/s (190 m/s). The result was a cartridge and handgun combination with relatively mild recoil, but with good penetration and excellent stopping power. The .455 Webley was rated superior to the .45 Colt in stopping power in the famous Thompson-LaGarde Tests that resulted in the adoption of the United States .45 ACP cartridge. The bullet of this cartridge goes slowly enough to be seen in flight under the right light conditions. .455 Webley ammunition is most commonly used in the Webley .455 top break revolver (Marks I through to VI).

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Old 08-03-2007, 11:43 PM
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IMO 357sig is about a useless round. Go with a 9-40 why would you want anything in between and the ammo is hard as heck to find as well. I see the 357 sig going the way of the dinosaur.
Old 08-06-2007, 07:40 AM
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Because the 357 sig will penetrate an engine block! That sonofabuck is HARD hitting. 9mm, .40, or .45 don't even come close!
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Old 08-06-2007, 07:52 AM
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I created a 357 sig vs 40 s&w thread here - http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?p=9129

This thread is for listing pistol calibers and a description of each one.

Kyle, thank you for adding to the list.
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Old 08-06-2007, 06:00 PM
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the 357 sig will penetrate a engine block?? the sig the little short round that is a mix breed 9mmx40cal?? not the full size 357, i love my 357. if the sig can i would deff have to see that one.
Old 12-26-2007, 05:45 AM
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9 40 357 45acp 32 38 22
Old 02-24-2008, 08:17 PM
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.460 S&W Magnum: The .460 round is a longer, more powerful version of the popular .454 Casull, itself a longer and more powerful version of the .45 Colt. Consequently, weapons that fire .460 are usually capable of firing the less powerful .454 Casull and .45 Colt rounds, but this must be verified with each weapon's manufacturer. The reverse, however, does not apply: .45 Colt and .454 Casull handguns cannot accept .460 rounds. If attempted, explosion and life-threatening injury may occur. The length of the .460 also makes it difficult if not impossible to chamber into smaller handguns. The Smith and Wesson 460XVR and 460V are two revolvers designed to fire the .460 S&W round. Smith and Wesson boast that the .460 is the highest velocity revolver cartridge in the world, firing bullets at 2630 ft/s (750 m/s). The .460 achieves over 2500 ft·lbff (3.25 KJ) of energy by driving a 200 gr bullet at 2330 ft/s but this falls short of the title "most powerful commercial handgun cartridge" as the .500 S&W Magnum drives a 350 grain round at 1975fps at over 3032 ft·lbf. (DoubleTap Ammunition Co.)

My best friend recently purchased a .460. It shoots easier than my brother in laws .45. I like the fact you can shoot varied ammo through it. Plus if you are on the recieving end it looks like a battleshp has just opened fire!! :D
Old 04-16-2008, 04:56 PM
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In defense of the .357 SIG (and .400 Cor-Bon, incidentally), there is some advantage in the fact that a single pistol can provide two calibre solutions with the simple change of a barrel (in most cases). I think a .45 ACP in a 1911-style pistol is the great solution to a wide number of problems, but if I can drop in a different barrel and achieve much higher velocities (near 10mm performance), it opens the number of useful applications for that firearm and its magazines. A .357 SIG barrel for a .40 S&W pistol would have a similar function. Versatility is sometimes nice.
Old 05-25-2008, 05:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AgentNoir View Post
In defense of the .357 SIG (and .400 Cor-Bon, incidentally), there is some advantage in the fact that a single pistol can provide two calibre solutions with the simple change of a barrel (in most cases). I think a .45 ACP in a 1911-style pistol is the great solution to a wide number of problems, but if I can drop in a different barrel and achieve much higher velocities (near 10mm performance), it opens the number of useful applications for that firearm and its magazines. A .357 SIG barrel for a .40 S&W pistol would have a similar function. Versatility is sometimes nice.
Thats what I like about a good 1911 like WILSON COMBAT, you can get a 22 conversion slide and barrel for it and have a plinker for pratice and a knock down for serious work.
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Old 06-09-2008, 04:28 PM
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In the Feb/March issue of On Target,Pg 44 they compare the 9mm Luger,.357 Sig,.40 S&W,and the .45 ACP.They said "As far as energy is concerned,the .357 Sig is king".Just wondering if anyone else reads this magazine?
Old 06-12-2008, 12:20 PM
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Good Topic, thank You!
Old 08-16-2008, 07:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SHoNUFF View Post
the 357 sig will penetrate a engine block?? the sig the little short round that is a mix breed 9mmx40cal?? not the full size 357, i love my 357. if the sig can i would deff have to see that one.
The 357 sig is as powerful as the 357 magnum. There is no question about it. It was initally designed for law enforcement use and is unlawful for civillian ownership in some countries due to it's ability to defeat body armor. Your full sized 357 magnum may use longer brass but the sig has a wider diameter making up for some of the lost case capacity, and the next point to consider is it uses faster burning powders to develop the higher velocities to equal the magnum performance. Add the fact that there is no loss of gas to cylinder blast thar revolvers suffer from and you have a smaller round that performs just as well as the larger. It's the old David and Goliath story all over again. The 357 Sig is starting to gain popularity within the past year, in part due to the fact that with a simple barrel swap most .40S&W pistols can be easily converted back and forth between the two calibers. There are several manufacturers advertising this fact that sell aftermarket barrels for Glocks.
Old 10-24-2008, 02:29 AM
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9mm Luger: The 9mm Parabellum pistol cartridge was introduced in 1902 by the German weapons manufacturer Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) for their Luger pistol. It was a higher-power version of the earlier 7.65mm Luger Parabellum, itself developed from an earlier 7.65mm Borchardt cartridge. During the 1980's the US military started looking at 9mm pistols to replace the 45 acp. The M9 9mm pistol was adopted by the military in the 1980's. It is essentially a mil-spec Beretta 92F, later the 92FS.



Why did the military consider the 9mm over the .45?????????

Better question why do so many consider the .45 supreme over the 9mm???

There is alot more behind a pistol round besides the size of the bullet..... especialy after you consider hollow points. The military chose the 9mm even in FMJ, what's the deal.......don't go to a gun fight unless you have a caliber starting with .4........?

I like the .357 sig, it's impressive.......engine block? you were talking about a 2 stroke right.
Old 10-24-2008, 07:56 PM
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Left out at least...

.32 S&W Short
.32 S&W Long
.38 S&W


Allan
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