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Old 07-24-2007, 08:14 AM
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Default Online Sources For Food Date, Shelf Life, & Closing Date Code Information



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Here are some Online sources to aid in determinding when commercially produced canned foods were produced, the sell by dates, best used by dates, etc. Below these online sources I will list some sites which offer food storage specific information.

Please look at and read this Online information source first as it reveals the limitations on can food labeling, date information, FDA regulations, types of date information, and general facts about the shelf life of commercial canned foods [ http://www.amarogue.com/foodexpiration.html ]

Plesase note the following four very important quotes:

a) "Canned food has a shelf life of at least two years from the date of processing. Canned food retains its safety and nutritional value well beyond two years, but it may have some variation in quality, such as a change of color and texture."

b) "Each canned food manufacturer has a unique coding system. Some manufacturers list day, month and year of production, while other companies reference only the year. These codes are usually imprinted on the top or bottom of the can. Other numbers may appear and reference the specific plant manufacturing or product information and are not useful to consumers. Below is a sampling of how some manufacturers code their products so consumers know when the product was packaged. If you have specific questions about a company's product, contact a customer service representative at the phone number listed"

c) "There are several types of dates
"Sell-by" date - tells the store how long to display the product for sale. You should buy the product before the date expires.
"Best if Used By (or Before)" - recommended for best flavor or quality. It is not a purchase or safety date.
"Use-By" - the last date recommended for the use of product while at peak quality. The date has been determined by the manufacturer of the product.
"Closed or Coded Dates" - packing numbers for use by the manufacturer in tracking their products. This enables manufacturers to rotate their stock as well as locate their products in the event of a recall."

d) "Expired Dates
"As long as a product is wholesome, a retailer may legally sell fresh or processed meat and poultry products beyond the expiration date on the package"


I will begin with those sources which offer information on a variety of brand names then proceed to the brand specific sources.

1) From Walton Foods: http://waltonfeed.com/self/lid.html

2) This source offers information on a list of name brands.

http://www.amarogue.com/foodcode.html

Here is information on Libby Brand canned meats frlom Frugal's courtesy of Beefeater.

" Beefeater 4th December 2007 11:18 AM


FYI on Libby's canned meats- shelf life & date codes

I rec'd my amazon order, or at least part of it, containing the Libby's Roast Beef in the 12oz cans. I called to verify the date code on it. My set of numbers across the top of the can read:

070220 B
190607 L6

The bold font is the date code and it means Y/M/D made. So mine was made February 20, 2007. I asked what the shelf life is and she told me it was 5 years. She also went on to add that corned beef is also 5 years & that their Vienna sausages are 2 years (even though IIRC the viennas have a BBD on them).

Just thought someone might be interested in that tidbit of knowledge! "


3) Here are the contact phone numbers for many of the Con Agra food brands as well as other information on food dates of their brands.

http://www.conagrafoods.com/utilities/includes/faq.jsp

4) http://www.kraftfoods.com/kf

5) http://www.kraftfoods.com/kf

6) http://www.a1comserv.com/gary/expire.html

Here are some sites which offer food storage and storage life information.

1) http://waltonfeed.com/grain/faqs/index.html


2) http://waltonfeed.com/grain/life.html

3) http://www.survival-center.com/foodfaq/index.htm

4)http://www.homefoodsafety.org/index.jsp

5) http://millennium-ark.net/News_Files/Hollys.html : This site needs to be read in detail by examining the subtopics such as those listed under the heading of "Shelf Lives of Food". Read this site in its entirety, you will gain an encyclopedia of information on the subjects of food storage and shelf life.


This offering is NOT Comprehensive. One should contact a food brand directly for any questions and more detailed information.

Would it be of interest if I put together a similar listing of online sources from which to purchase survival supplies such as food, water purification, sanitation, tools, shelter, cooking, etc. ?


Here is a website link on Closing Date Codes used by manufacturers.

http://www.monkey-wrenching.com/public_html/pkgcode.htm

Last edited by 411man; 12-04-2007 at 03:29 PM..
Old 08-13-2007, 10:48 PM
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I guess I missed this post.
Real good.
Thanks 411man!
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Old 03-24-2008, 03:36 PM
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I missed this one also, thx......
 
Old 04-27-2008, 10:53 PM
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Great and very useful post! Thanks!
Old 04-30-2008, 11:34 AM
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Another wonderful reference for food storage: http://standeyo.com/News_Files/menu.food.store.html
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Old 12-02-2008, 08:42 PM
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Reminds me of when I worked at Rite Aid- when rotating out candy bars, most of them had a serial number followed by a letter and a two-digit number. The letter was the expiration month, and the number was the expiration year- i.e., 12K means November, 2012.

Thanks for the info!

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Old 01-21-2009, 06:36 AM
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Thank you 411Man , very useful info.
Old 03-23-2009, 10:09 PM
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good stuff here
Old 10-14-2009, 09:42 AM
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Outstanding information 411man. I guess it all comes down to storing correctly and investing in the right food types. Bravo Zulu
Old 10-14-2009, 10:35 AM
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Glad to help with the limits on the time people have to searchout such vital information I seek to contribute the kind of useful information to benefit the efforts of those seeking to become prepared.
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Old 12-10-2009, 10:12 PM
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Thank you, 411man for the links to the other spots for specific food expiration. IMHO, we Americans are so accustomed to having access to fresh food, we need to be reminded that things do expire occasionally, even when canned and/or sealed.
Old 12-13-2009, 11:13 AM
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I just added additional information today to my data base.

Please review and add to your information base.

See below.


Shelf Lives of Some Common Storage Foods

http://www.storefood.com/Grain/faqs/vc.html


STORAGE LIFE OF PARTICULAR FOODS

http://www.waltonfeed.com/blog/show/article_id/162


Canned Food, Shelf Life

http://www.foodreference.com/html/tc...html#datecodes


STORAGE LIFE OF DRY FOODS

http://standeyo.com/News_Files/Food/...helf_Life.html


LIGHTWEIGHT - DEHYDRATED - LONG TERM - EXTENDED SHELF LIFE

http://survivalacres.com/dehydrated/index.html


INTRODUCTION AND FACTORS EFFECTING STORAGE

http://waltonfeed.com/blog/show/article_id/163
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Old 12-13-2009, 08:34 PM
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http://stilltasty.com/ is another good source on the storage life of common foods.
Old 01-25-2010, 02:06 AM
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This is exactly what I was looking for....
Old 02-04-2010, 09:51 AM
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I've read through a lot of the links. I wonder if anyone has any thoughts regarding dry infant formula? In the book I'm working on, I have an orphaned baby--need to feed him. Breastfeeding is out as the other characters are all male. This is a futuristic, after-the-plague type of book. Options are limited. Any ideas?

Any help would be deeply appreciated. It's been forty years since I had to worry about feeding babies and I know a lot of things have changed since then.
Old 02-04-2010, 11:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annycook View Post
I've read through a lot of the links. I wonder if anyone has any thoughts regarding dry infant formula? In the book I'm working on, I have an orphaned baby--need to feed him. Breastfeeding is out as the other characters are all male. This is a futuristic, after-the-plague type of book. Options are limited. Any ideas?

Any help would be deeply appreciated. It's been forty years since I had to worry about feeding babies and I know a lot of things have changed since then.
As I have just become a grandmother, this became a very relevant topic for me as well. I stumbled across this last year and saved the info...

Emergency Food For Babies

Infants and very small children would be the first victims of starvation during and after a pandemic, unless special preparations are made on their behalf. They need foods that are more concentrated and less rough. Most American mothers do not nurse their infants, and if a family's supply of baby foods were exhausted the parents might experience the agony of seeing their baby slowly starve. Under unsanitary conditions, it is safer to make a formula 3 times a day. To do so, add 1/3 cup plus 2 teaspoons (a little less than one ounce) of instant nonfat milk powder to 1-1/3 cups (2/3 pint) of boiled water, and stir thoroughly. Then add 1 tablespoon (about 1/3 ounce, or 9
grams) of vegetable oil and 2 teaspoons of sugar, and stir. (If regular bakers' milk powder is used, 1/4 cup is enough when making one-third of the daily formula, 3 times a day.) If baby bottles are not at hand, milk can be
spoon-fed to an infant.

During a crisis, the best and most dependable food for an infant is mother's milk provided the mother is assured an adequate diet. The possibility of disaster is one more reason why a mother should nurse her baby for a full
year. Storing additional high-protein foods and fats for a nursing mother usually will be better insurance against her infant getting sick or starving than keeping adequate stocks of baby foods and the equipment necessary for
sanitary feeding after evacuation or an attack.

To give a daily vitamin supplement to a baby, a multivitamin pill should be crushed to a fine powder between two spoons and dissolved in a small amount of fluid, so that the baby can easily swallow it. If an infant does not
receive adequate amounts of vitamins A, D, and C, he will develop deficiency symptoms in 1 to 3 months, depending on the amounts stored in his body. Vitamin C deficiency, the first to appear, can be prevented by giving an infant 15 mg of vitamin C each day (about 1/3 of a 50-mg vitamin C tablet, pulverized) or customary foods containing vitamin C, such as orange juice.
Lacking these sources, the juice squeezed from sprouted grains or legumes can be used. If no vitamin pills or foods rich in vitamin D are available, exposure of the baby's skin to sunlight will cause his body to produce vitamin
D. If sufficient milk is not obtainable, even infants younger than six months should be given solid food. Solid foods for babies must be pureed to a fine texture. Using a modern baby food grinder makes pureeing quick and easy
work. Under crisis conditions, a grinder should be cleaned and disinfected like other baby-feeding utensils, as described later in this section. Several expedient methods are available: the food can be pressed through a sieve,
mashed with a fork or spoon, or squeezed through a porous cloth. Good sanitation must be maintained; all foods should be brought to a boil after pureeing to insure that the food is safe from bacteria.
A pureed solid baby food can be made by first boiling together 3 parts of a cereal grain and 1 part of beans until they are soft. Then the mixture should be pressed through a sieve. The sieve catches the tough hulls from the
grain kernels and the skins from the beans. The grain-beans combination will provide needed calories and a well supplemented protein. The beans also supply the additional iron that a baby needs by the time he is 6 months
old. Flours made from whole grains or beans, as previously described, also can be used; however, these may contain more rough material. Some grains are preferable to others. It is easier to sieve cooked corn kernels than
cooked wheat kernels. Since wheat is the grain most likely to cause allergies, it should not be fed to an infant until he is 6 to 7 months old if other grains, such as rice or corn, are available. Small children also need more protein
than can be supplied by grains alone. As a substitute for milk, some bean food should be provided at every meal. If the available diet is deficient in a
concentrated energy source such as fat or sugar, a child's feedings should be increased to 4 or 5 times a day, to enable him to assimilate more. Whenever possible, a small child should have a daily diet that contains at least one ounce of fat (3 tablespoons, without scraping the spoon). This would provide more than 10% of a young child's calories in the form of fat, which would be beneficial.

If under emergency conditions it is not practical to boil infant feeding utensils, they can be sterilized with a bleach solution. Add one teaspoon of ordinary household bleach to a quart of water. (Ordinary household bleach
contains 5.25% sodium hypochlorite as its only active ingredient and supplies approximately 5% available chlorine. If the strength of the bleach is unknown, add 3 teaspoons per quart.) Directions for safe feeding without
boiling follow:

Utensils
1. Immediately after feeding, wash the inside and outside of all utensils used to prepare the formula and to
feed the infant.
2. Fill a covered container with clean, cold water and add the appropriate amount of chlorine bleach.
3. Totally immerse all utensils until the next feeding (3 or 4 hours). Be sure that the bottle, if used, is filled
with bleach solution. Keep container covered.
At feeding time: Wash hands before preparing food. Remove utensils from the disinfectant chlorine solution and drain, but do not rinse or dry. Prepare formula; feed the baby. Immediately after feeding: Wash utensils in clean
water and immerse again in the disinfectant solution. Prepare fresh chlorine solution each day.
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Old 02-04-2010, 11:56 PM
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Cool post and info thanks!
Old 02-05-2010, 03:02 PM
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Wow! Thank you so much for the info!
Old 07-29-2010, 05:18 PM
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Very informative, A great-full thanks.
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