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Old 10-28-2010, 02:18 PM
Mic Mic is offline
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I recently started rotating some stock and pulling down some of my stored stuff to use it and replace it. Dehydrated milk comes to mind. Here is the thing, I don't really care for this stuff. I realize it should be part of my preps, but the issue is we don't use it and I know you need to.

Now here is the thing, if the SHTF I will use it, it isn't horrible, just not particularly great either. I am finding we just don't rotate it through our diet as long as alternatives exists, i.e. real milk, but as I said if I had to use it we would be and be glad we had it.

I can think of a few other things this applies to as well, but I think you guys get the idea. What should we do?
Old 10-28-2010, 02:26 PM
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If it has expired or is about to expire and you know you don't want it then donate it to your local food bank. I don't know about others but ours accepts food that has even expired. I gave them all of our Y2K food a year or so after they expired.

I don't care for powdered milk either and will most likely make a donation of what I don't use.
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Old 10-28-2010, 02:29 PM
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Well, the food storage mantra "store what you eat, and eat what you store" takes care of a lot of that. But I'm with you on things like powdered milk. I store it too. I began years ago, to rotate my storage foods into my everyday diet. In some cases, like with wheat or powdered milk, "storing what I use" didn't apply. So I began to "use what I store" instead, and sort of adapted to it.

Now powdered milk is all that I use. I guess you sorta get used to it. But I found the key is not to follow the package directions for mixing. You need to tinker with the ratio to find out what works for you.

If you're storing foods that you don't normally eat, it requires learning to use the new foods. The time to learn this is now, not then. I've learned so much about using whole wheat. Things I might not have been able to learn during an emergency. I've learned to cook with dehydrated foods, and come to enjoy them.

The way I've applied it to my own food storage is more like "learn to eat what you store, then store what you've learned to eat". Works for me.
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Old 10-28-2010, 02:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mic View Post
I recently started rotating some stock and pulling down some of my stored stuff to use it and replace it. Dehydrated milk comes to mind. Here is the thing, I don't really care for this stuff. I realize it should be part of my preps, but the issue is we don't use it and I know you need to.

Now here is the thing, if the SHTF I will use it, it isn't horrible, just not particularly great either. I am finding we just don't rotate it through our diet as long as alternatives exists, i.e. real milk, but as I said if I had to use it we would be and be glad we had it.

I can think of a few other things this applies to as well, but I think you guys get the idea. What should we do?
Can't say it better than MikeK did tbh

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Well, the food storage mantra "store what you eat, and eat what you store" takes care of a lot of that.
Our dietry habits have changed over recent years and most of the tinned stuff we used to eat and store ended up just sitting there...... and sitting there.......... then got donated to family Our tinned stores aren't half what they once were because of this, tinned veg is a thing of the past for starters.

Have you thought about tinned milk such as carnation? Not so great on cereal but nice in coffee and good for cooking....... its more expensive but if you use it like we do........ its worth it, just a thought.
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Old 10-28-2010, 02:50 PM
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My wife came up with a good way to use our powdered milk. She uses it for all her cooking needs. Instead of good liquid milk, she will mix the powdered milk for cakes, cookies or any other food prep that required milk. It tastes the same when mixed with the other items.
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Old 10-28-2010, 02:55 PM
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Does powdered milk fill any nutrition/dietary need that can't be filled with something else?
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Old 10-28-2010, 03:22 PM
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LOL...I knew when I read this that MikeK was going to be all over this one
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Old 10-28-2010, 03:24 PM
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My wife came up with a good way to use our powdered milk. She uses it for all her cooking needs. Instead of good liquid milk, she will mix the powdered milk for cakes, cookies or any other food prep that required milk. It tastes the same when mixed with the other items.
That is what we do here to rotate the milk out of the pantry. It works well!
Old 10-28-2010, 03:40 PM
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Does powdered milk fill any nutrition/dietary need that can't be filled with something else?
Nope. But it can be used in lots of comfort food recipes.
Old 10-28-2010, 03:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mic View Post
I recently started rotating some stock and pulling down some of my stored stuff to use it and replace it. Dehydrated milk comes to mind. Here is the thing, I don't really care for this stuff. I realize it should be part of my preps, but the issue is we don't use it and I know you need to.

Now here is the thing, if the SHTF I will use it, it isn't horrible, just not particularly great either. I am finding we just don't rotate it through our diet as long as alternatives exists, i.e. real milk, but as I said if I had to use it we would be and be glad we had it.

I can think of a few other things this applies to as well, but I think you guys get the idea. What should we do?
...you wont last long.
Old 10-28-2010, 03:44 PM
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Does powdered milk fill any nutrition/dietary need that can't be filled with something else?
Not particularly, but it's a good source of calcium, which can come up a bit lacking in many other foods. Adds a protein boost too, though with proper storage, that's not an issue. It's also an almost indispensible cooking ingredient. So, it's really just personal choice. For me, the added nutrients make it a good storage food, and most people can get used to it in time. What they suggest is start mixing real milk and reconstituted powdered milk, then over time, start increasing the amount of powdered milk to fresh milk. Seems to work for kids.
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Old 10-28-2010, 03:47 PM
Ramona M. Faunce Ramona M. Faunce is offline
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Powdered milk can be used in creamed soups, custard pie, puddings, as well. I am not fond of the dehydrated soups and entrees, but if I add more pasta and cream of mushroom soup to the mix it gets rid of all that salty flavor.

If you're not fond of a food but have it around because it stores well, start experimenting with the food to get a better flavor.

It is going to be depressing enough living throught the next 10 years or so without having to dislike eating too.
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Old 10-28-2010, 03:48 PM
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Our dietry habits have changed over recent years and most of the tinned stuff we used to eat and store ended up just sitting there...... and sitting there.......... then got donated to family Our tinned stores aren't half what they once were because of this, tinned veg is a thing of the past for starters.

Have you thought about tinned milk such as carnation? Not so great on cereal but nice in coffee and good for cooking....... its more expensive but if you use it like we do........ its worth it, just a thought.
I can relate on the dietary changes. Mine never did include a lot of canned foods so I haven't really stored as many of those. But when I began incorporating dehydrated foods into my diet, it led me away from processed and prepackaged stuff. This made a healthy difference. It also made it easy to begin incorporating more fresh foods.

I have some tinned milk around, but to be honest, I've gotten so used to powdered that I actually prefer it. The last couple weeks I've been buying fresh milk. Oddly enough, I don't like it now! haha

I'm also buying a bit of Nido powdered whole milk. I don't care for it as liquid milk, but wow, does it ever make a difference in recipes! The strong "scorched cream" taste that I don't care for to drink, really brings out a richness in foods.
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Old 10-28-2010, 03:48 PM
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LOL...I knew when I read this that MikeK was going to be all over this one
Am I that predictable?
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Old 10-28-2010, 03:53 PM
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I can think of a few other things this applies to as well, but I think you guys get the idea. What should we do?
One thing I guess I overlooked, is that if you truly don't like something, don't store it. You're not going to like it any better when you're having to choke it down later, and it's not going to get rotated. If it's something you can get used to, or use it in recipes, it might be worth having. But if you can't find a real use for it, just store something else that you like instead.
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Old 10-28-2010, 03:58 PM
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When you're used to fresh eggs produced in-state (thankfully, my supply was not affected by recent recalls) and that day's milk from the on-site store at the dairy less than a mile away, powdered is going to be kinda crappy in comparison. At least you're trying to use it.

If you don't already, maybe you can start using these as the items added to a mix or recipe? Powdered eggs and powdered milk still make a decent pan of cornbread, or can be used instead of fresh when mixing up a box of cake mix for the Sunday School bake sale. Quality wise, I wouldn't use powdered eggs for a quiche, any more than I would try to make eggnog out of powdered milk, but when they aren't the "90% of it" main ingredient, I think you'll find they aren't quite the let-down that they are when used straight.

I've also known people to make a half-gallon of powdered milk, using an empty gallon jug (hold the cap tight, and shake it well) and then top it up with a half-gallon of regular whole milk. They get an end result that is reduced fat without being all the way down to skim, with taste and texture good enough that their kids are willing to drink it, or use it over cereal.
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Old 10-28-2010, 04:33 PM
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Originally Posted by W.Lynn View Post
When you're used to fresh eggs produced in-state (thankfully, my supply was not affected by recent recalls) and that day's milk from the on-site store at the dairy less than a mile away, powdered is going to be kinda crappy in comparison. At least you're trying to use it.
Powdered eggs are a really good example. Maybe even more so than powdered milk. They make a fair cooking ingredient, but by themselves, they leave much to be desired. But just like finding the right ratio for powdered milk, powdered eggs take some tinkering to get them right too. For example, if you cook them over too high of heat, they turn rubbery and watery. If you cook the slower until they're just done, they have a better texture and they don't give off water. Still, they don't make for great scrambled eggs. If you doctor them up with a few flavorful additions, they make a decent omelette though. That's another ingredient I had to learn how to use. But I still buy fresh eggs all the time.
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Old 10-28-2010, 05:03 PM
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One thing I guess I overlooked, is that if you truly don't like something, don't store it. You're not going to like it any better when you're having to choke it down later, and it's not going to get rotated. If it's something you can get used to, or use it in recipes, it might be worth having. But if you can't find a real use for it, just store something else that you like instead.
That reminded me of a funny story. Back when I was working and pregnant with our first child, I worked in the OR. A lunch lady used to bring up a limited lunch cart for those of us who worked in the OR to get lunch instead of going down to the cafeteria because by the time we went down, waited in line and came back most of our lunch time was over. Anyway, I was trying to be healty one day and eat creamed spincah. I hate spinach. I was minding my own business took a couple bites of spinach and then gag. Pause. Take another bite......gag. I was being watched by one of my male co-workers who quickly stepped in and said that's enough! LOL Sorry TMI.
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Old 10-28-2010, 05:10 PM
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My wife came up with a good way to use our powdered milk. She uses it for all her cooking needs. Instead of good liquid milk, she will mix the powdered milk for cakes, cookies or any other food prep that required milk. It tastes the same when mixed with the other items.
X2 on using powdered milk for cooking and baking. I also use it as a whitener in coffee as opposed to "coffeemate" or cream.
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Old 10-28-2010, 05:16 PM
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I have two options for you.

The first is to make it into yogurt. Some cultures (Fil Mjolk is my favorite) can be cultured at room temperature without a yogurt maker. You just put it on the counter. It hides the taste of powdered milk and with a little fruit is really good. I would eat it for the taste even if I didn’t consider it a prep food. The culture can be stored by dipping a cloth in the yogurt and letting it dry then placing it in a ziplock bag with a moister absorber.

The other option is to get a goat. I love my goats. They are easy animals to live with and if you have 2 of them you can keep one producing at all times. The only time goats milk tastes bad is if you keep a male around because they give off an odor to attract females. (think bad aftershave in a 70s disco lol) As a survival animal they are great and will live off of what we consider to be weeds with a little hay / grain to supplement.
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