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Old 10-24-2010, 10:10 PM
faceman faceman is offline
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Question Affordable super long term food storage???



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I really liked the wise food storage products.
However, after running calorie calculations, a single man consuming 2400 calories a day, would require $7000 worth of their product for a one year supply if you did not supplement at all.

OUCH!

They claim their freezedried/dyhydrated sealed product has a shelf life of 25 years in a cool place. Thats very attractive because I would only need to purchase my emergency food supply ONCE for the remainder of my life.

Is there a cheaper alternative?

I would assume, basic easy to eat carbs are the cheapest thing you could store in bulk, but how do you get a 25 year or even a 10 year shelf life on food if I wanted to use a cheaper do it yourself approach?

Im thinking dry grains/rice with air destroyers and air tight containers of some sort could approach this. Anyone know?

I need ideas.
I want SUPER LONG shelf life, as cheap as possible.
Old 10-24-2010, 10:22 PM
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Dehydrated foods are half the price of freeze dried and last almost as long. But the real secret isn't to buy it once and lock it away hoping to never use it. But to "store what you eat, and eat what you store". This lets you save big money on your grocery bill. It lets you learn to cook with these products, truly cook with them, to make excellant meals. It also lets your body get used to them. A drastic change in diet during a crisis is a really bad idea. It also keeps them rotated, so you don't have to worry about age.

That's why so many of us store dried beans, dried grains, powdered milk, pastas, dried and canned veggies and fruits, canned meats, etc. These are things that store well long term, are inexpensive, and can easily be incorporated in daily meals. I tend to buy a lot of dehydrated ingredients, myself, and don't do much canned food. But that's only my preference. It's also easy to dehydrate and can your own foods. You can't get much cheaper than that!

Home packing foods in mylar with O2 absorbers is so commonly discussed here, that I'll direct you to the search engine to find HUGE resources and information on the subject. I'm sure the sticky threads have a bunch of info too.
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Old 10-24-2010, 10:22 PM
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Im glad to see you did the math. To many members just buy all this crap because its called survival food or advertised on this forum.

This is not a complete food source but only single staples you can buy dirt cheap that will last indefenitley.

Pasta...store it right and it will last forever. Or you can store all the dry ingredients to make your own fresh pasta.

There are so many more goods, but i will take a step to the side and let others chime in. Im Italian so the pasta was very important to me to share with others.
Old 10-24-2010, 10:42 PM
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We've gone with 6 months of cans, jars, juices, pasta, rice etc. that we use all of the time and rotate on a regular basis.. Then we have 3 months of Mountain House freeze dried complete meals in #10 cans. We then have 6 months of long term storage staples like rice, beans, flour, etc. in super pails. We are now beginning to stock up on Provident Pantry Combo #10's from Emergency Essentials. The have 3 super combo packs. 15 #10 cans of freeze dried meat, 15 #10 cans of freeze dried veggies and 15 #10 cans of freeze dried fruit. They are 25 to 30 years with shelf life but raw ingredients that don't have the high sodium content of many fully prepared freeze dried meals.
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Old 10-24-2010, 10:55 PM
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CANT use the food rotation approach.

This long term food storage is for a SHTF scenario and will be stored 25 miles from where I live and cant be easily rotated. Only replaced every 10 years or so.

So thats why im looking for 1 year worth of food that I can store with the longest possible shelf life.

Just finished reading some good stuff on storing hard grains with dry ice that should last 10-20+ years.
Old 10-24-2010, 11:02 PM
Ed Bernay Ed Bernay is offline
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why don't you do mountain house #10 cans of protein, bags of rice and pasta. Throw in some ramen noodles and some canned veggies to balance it out.
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Old 10-24-2010, 11:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by faceman View Post
CANT use the food rotation approach.

This long term food storage is for a SHTF scenario and will be stored 25 miles from where I live and cant be easily rotated. Only replaced every 10 years or so.

So thats why im looking for 1 year worth of food that I can store with the longest possible shelf life.

Just finished reading some good stuff on storing hard grains with dry ice that should last 10-20+ years.
Dry ice is not a very effective method compared to O2 absorbers. Laboratory tests have been done on it, nitrogen flushing and O2 absorbers. O2 absorbers aren't that pricey.

Any of the dried foods properly packaged and most any canned foods will last 10 years easy.

Also, if you want to guarantee your grains stay bug free, consider getting a small amount of food grade diatomaceous earth. It's what the package mix companies use to keep foods like Bisquick bug free in their packaging. A little goes a long way too, so you don't need to buy much. But considering all the uses it has around the house and retreat, having a little extra wouldn't hurt.
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Old 10-25-2010, 12:36 AM
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Ok, so I found some nice 6 gallon buckets which are sealed with O2 absorbers and filled with a 9 grain cereal mix. 10,20,30,40 year shelf life, depending on storage temps.

Ran the calorie calculations, and it would run about $1100 for one year worth of calories at 2400/cal per day.

I think that will be my base calories, and ill swap some of those buckets out with dehydrated milk and some other protein sources.
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Old 10-25-2010, 06:50 AM
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The only way to get long-term storage at the most reasonable price is to do much of the work yourself: Gathering the food, storage medium, O2 absorbers, etc., and then packing it yourself.

The cheapest I've found well-packaged LTS is from the LDS catalog website: http://tinyurl.com/3xs5994. Their prices are very good, include delivery, and are packed in #10 cans which store very well. They're not the cheapest for these things--packing it yourself is cheapest--but they're very good for what they do sell the public.

HOWEVER, I have never bought from them for OPSEC reasons. The boxes of wheat, for instance, say WHEAT in large letters on the side, which announces to the delivery service driver and any neighbors who happen to be watching that I'm prepping. I wasn't willing to accept the OPSEC violation for the convenience of already-packed LTS food.

I've packed my own wheat for cheaper than the LDS website sells it, using mylar bags, O2 absorbers, and food-grade 5-gallon buckets. The LDS boxes contain 33# of wheat, the same as I can store in a single 5-gallon bucket. With a bulk wheat buy (400#), I ended up storing 33# for for an equivalent of about $22, compared to the LDS price of $28. That's with paying for shipping for buckets and mylar and O2 packs.

In short, the more pre-processing and packing your food has, the more expensive it will be. If you don't have time, OPSEC isn't a concern, you don't have a place to do some of this--then maybe things are different for you than for others. Only you can determine that.
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Old 10-25-2010, 06:57 AM
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One more thing: It's great to store wheat for the long term--you can get 30+ years of shelf life stored properly, lots of good nutrition in it, etc.

HOWEVER, you also have to consider how you're going to use it. Unless you're going to make thermos wheat all the time, you'll need some way to grind it, presumably into flour, from which you'll make your own self-prepared food.

That means you'll need a grain mill to grind the flour, yeast and perhaps other ingredients to make bread, muffins, and so on, and the utensils and facilities to cook it. The same goes for rice, beans, and the like, though they are generally quicker to cook with than wheat.

The advantage to freeze-dried and other kinds of prepared food is that they don't require most of those intermediate steps on the way to consuming the food. Wheat and beans and rice *will* last a very long time, but you don't just open the bucket and spoon it out to eat.

We don't know the features/characteristics of your BOL, but that has to figure in to what kinds of LTS foods you store there. Does it have a fully-stocked kitchen? Or is it a wooden building with no modern conveniences? That has to inform you as to what you end up storing.

GL; I'll enjoy reading this thread as it unfolds.
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Old 10-25-2010, 07:25 AM
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Our BOL will be very minimal. No kitchen, etc.
Probably a dutch oven, some minimal cooking tools.
A small hidden shelter with supplies. Maybe a small wood stove inside for heat and cooking.
Old 10-25-2010, 09:53 AM
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www.bucketpacking.com

Will show you how to pack yourself.

http://www.survivalandpreparednessfo...n-food-storage

Getting started in food storage, will show you how to put up a basic 1 year supply for around $.70 cents a day.

The important thing is to DO IT. Don't over analyze it, don't wait till you have the super insulated air conditioned command bunker to put it all in, just DO IT.

Their is hundreds of reasons why NOT to do it- NONE of them will feed your family when the time comes.

Do it. Their IS time left, the question is how are you going to use it? Are you going to be one of these people that claim to have been "into this" for years but still don't have any food storage? Internet posts, lists, charts, "FAQ's", good intentions and "plans" aren't going to keep your family from starving.

Do it now, while there is still time.

Lowdown3
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Old 10-25-2010, 12:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by faceman View Post
Ok, so I found some nice 6 gallon buckets which are sealed with O2 absorbers and filled with a 9 grain cereal mix. 10,20,30,40 year shelf life, depending on storage temps.

Ran the calorie calculations, and it would run about $1100 for one year worth of calories at 2400/cal per day.

I think that will be my base calories, and ill swap some of those buckets out with dehydrated milk and some other protein sources.
I regularly eat the 9 grain cereal mix and it's very good. You might add some beans to your storage also. Beans and grains contain complimentary amino acids. So when eaten together, you're getting as complete of a protein as if you had eaten meat.

There are some quick cooking versions such as split peas and lentils. And the small white beans don't take a lot of effort either. Any of them can be cooked with less fuel and time if you use a pressure cooker.

Toss in some fats of some type and you have covered your most basic needs as to calories, protein and fats. You'll still a source for your vitamins and minerals, but you'll have the basics covered.
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Old 10-26-2010, 12:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lowdown3 View Post

Getting started in food storage, will show you how to put up a basic 1 year supply for around $.70 cents a day.
What link shows how to do this for 70 cents a day? I couldnt find it. How many calories does that 70 cents represent?

Im ready to go... if only I knew where to purchase my supplies from.
Im still trying to figure out who has the best prices so I can max out my supplies, and still researching the exact method of packaging so it stores for 20+years. Also trying to figure out the truly essential list of long term storage items.
Old 10-26-2010, 01:09 AM
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CRAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAP! Found a good core set of supplies, pre-sealed for cheap. About $600 for a year supply of basic stuff. However, the shipping to my state is like $400!!!! 600 pounds of food is costly to ship.

Grrrrrrrrrrr, I guess I kind find everything locally if I want to do it cheap, and package it all my self
Old 10-26-2010, 09:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by faceman View Post
CRAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAP! Found a good core set of supplies, pre-sealed for cheap. About $600 for a year supply of basic stuff. However, the shipping to my state is like $400!!!! 600 pounds of food is costly to ship.

Grrrrrrrrrrr, I guess I kind find everything locally if I want to do it cheap, and package it all my self

Tell the vendor you can arrange your own shipping, then get weights and dimensions, freight can be very cheap if you know how to run it yourself. Unless they say no outside freight, post on here any results if you try that avenue and I can help you find a better rate.
Old 10-26-2010, 01:30 PM
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Found an alternative company that ships for free above a certain weight and ended up being cheaper.

The difference between buying pre-mylar-sealed buckets of grains and doing it myself is only $150 for a 1 year supply. Im willing to pay that much for that labor, so its all good.
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Old 10-26-2010, 01:59 PM
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You should plan on four cups of rice/pasta/oats and four cans of food per day per adult male at the minimum. Rice, pasta and beans are your best filler foods and actually are cheapest by volume.

I would go with the trifecta of supermarket canned goods, bulk rice/beans/grains and nitro/dehydrated veggies/fruits/meats/meals.

Sams, Costco, Walmart and local groceries often have sales on canned goods.

LDS is best for bulk rice/beans and grains:

http://www.ldscatalog.com/webapp/wcs...tId=1&sortOr=1

Here's a site that provides info on freeze dried, nitro and MRE options:

http://www.familysurvivalcenter.com/supplies.htm#food

Don't try to buy everything at once because you would probably spend over $5,000 and make alot of bad decisions all at once.

I'd work with $500 per month and adjust your itemlist as you go. You'll start to see the "survival" foods everywhere you go after awhile.
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Old 10-26-2010, 02:37 PM
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It almost sounds like you are making a cashe rather than a food store. Bucket packing is going to be a good choice for you.
Old 10-26-2010, 10:08 PM
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This is a solid foundation for a 1 year food supply that is very hard to beat.
Comes in mylar sealed + O2 absorber + food quality 6 gal buckets
$378!!!

400 pounds of grains/wheat/legumes = 1 year supply for a man
http://beprepared.com/product.asp_Q_...%20&%20Legumes

Then just add a few buckets of sweetners, salt, dehydrated veg/fruit and proteins and you are done, thats a solid stash

Can anyone beat this?
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