Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > Survival & Preparedness Forum > Farming, Gardening & Homesteading
Articles Chat Room Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files



Farming, Gardening & Homesteading Country lifestyle, homesteading and living off the grid.

Advertise Here
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-14-2010, 09:45 PM
Harmless Drudge's Avatar
Harmless Drudge Harmless Drudge is offline
Thirteenther
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: A once-free nation
Age: 36
Posts: 12,793
Thanks: 84,113
Thanked 37,424 Times in 9,239 Posts
Default How readily does wheat cross-pollenate and hybridize?



Advertise Here

How readily does wheat cross-pollenate and hybridize? I ask because I just bought several varieties of heirloom wheat, and need to know how far apart they need to be planted in order to insure that they do not hybridize.

Also, I am planting rye, oats, and barley. I know that wheat and rye can cross-pollenate (hence triticale), so how far apart do they need to be planted to prevent hybridization? Can any other grains hybridize outside their species?

I am doing small test plots of grains to see which grow best here.
Old 10-15-2010, 06:39 PM
Harmless Drudge's Avatar
Harmless Drudge Harmless Drudge is offline
Thirteenther
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: A once-free nation
Age: 36
Posts: 12,793
Thanks: 84,113
Thanked 37,424 Times in 9,239 Posts
Default

Beuller? Beuller? Beuller?
Old 10-15-2010, 07:11 PM
jwcoastal's Avatar
jwcoastal jwcoastal is offline
Diver
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Central California
Posts: 81
Thanks: 211
Thanked 140 Times in 39 Posts
Default

I see you didn't get much of a response...so I'll toss out what I know. Your wheat can be pollinated by plants other than your own plants only if there is a source and a means to transport the pollin. If you are planting your wheat in an area where there are few or no other farmers you won't have much problem. The other consideration is that your plants will be providing the pollen at the right time at the right place with little need for transport other than the wind. The more wheat that you plant , the odds are greater that your own plants will do the pollination. Even if you do get some cross pollination it would be a small amount. If you plant a similar variety of wheat at a different time then your neighbor plants then the period when the plants can be pollinated may not be the same. This can reduce the chance of cross pollination. Hope this helps.

Bottom line is if you plant a large field of wheat next to hybrid wheat or to a rye crop you will probably get some plants that produce hybrids. It doesn't matter really. If your more than a mile or so away from other fields it probably isn't significant.

Take your seed wheat from as far away from the other fields as possible.
The Following User Says Thank You to jwcoastal For This Useful Post:
Old 10-15-2010, 07:18 PM
ex-hunter's Avatar
ex-hunter ex-hunter is offline
old hand
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: rural midwest
Posts: 7,391
Thanks: 3,460
Thanked 6,230 Times in 2,966 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jwcoastal View Post
Your wheat can be pollinated by plants other than your own plants only if there is a source and a means to transport the pollin.
This is true ... and I would add that most of the pollenation happens minutes after the time/conditions are right, and in a self pollenating plant (like wheat) it is difficult to cross pollenate varieties.

While it is possible, it is highly improbable.
The Following User Says Thank You to ex-hunter For This Useful Post:
Old 10-16-2010, 08:31 AM
Harmless Drudge's Avatar
Harmless Drudge Harmless Drudge is offline
Thirteenther
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: A once-free nation
Age: 36
Posts: 12,793
Thanks: 84,113
Thanked 37,424 Times in 9,239 Posts
Default

Thanks. I am doing small test-plots, but I only got two winter wheats (planting today). I am more concerned with the 9 varieties of spring wheat that I will be trying in the spring. How far apart should I plant them?
Old 10-16-2010, 03:18 PM
Packitup Packitup is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 589
Thanks: 25
Thanked 475 Times in 264 Posts
Default

Separated by 200 feet you will see very little cross pollination. Tests done by Colorado State University showed cross pollination levels at 1 tenth of one percent or 1 seed in every 10, 000 when there was 200 feet separating different varieties.

Rye matures later than wheat so you should not have a problem with it cross pollinating with your wheat.
Reply

Bookmarks



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Cross Firebird Devotional and Prayer 1 08-08-2010 07:17 PM
Wheat Berries vs Wheat flour fullofit Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 11 07-15-2010 12:20 PM
Readily Available Chemicals Could Pose Terror Risk Newsfeed General Discussion 7 09-27-2009 09:05 AM
A Primer On Wheat and Wheat Flour 411man Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 3 08-01-2009 10:09 PM
The Thief on the Cross! ActionJackson Religious Discussion 28 06-25-2008 05:52 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:28 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright Kevin Felts 2006 - 2012,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net