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Old 08-30-2010, 09:55 PM
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Default Burning pine in a wood stove.



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We're setting up a cabin on our property and I plan on installing a wood stove to heat it with.
The stove will be a small one with a through-the-wall chimney setup.

The property is covered in mostly planted pines, with a few hardwoods.

I'd rather not deplete the hardwoods, and the pines are abundant so, if at all possible, I'd like to burn pine in the stove.

What can I do to make this work?

I know they will generate a lot of creosote and that can be dangerous, but is there some regular maintenance that I can do to successfully burn pines in the stove?

Any and all help is appreciated!
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Old 08-30-2010, 09:58 PM
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Just keep the chimney cleaned more often.
Old 08-30-2010, 10:01 PM
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Get more lumber to replace your cabin when that creosoted pipe caches fire and burns your cabin down.
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Old 08-30-2010, 10:02 PM
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Just keep the chimney cleaned more often.
How? I see they sell special cleaning logs. Any good?
Old 08-30-2010, 10:04 PM
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NEVER,NEVER,NEVER BURN PINE IN YOUR WOOD BURNING STOVE!! Its just not worth the risk of burning your place down!!
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Old 08-30-2010, 10:19 PM
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Being a soft wood, pine has the tendency to burn fast but without producing much heat. It can also cause the build up of creosote in your chimney and therefore increase the risk of a chimney fire. If you do burn pine in your wood stove, do so sparingly and with only well seasoned wood.

Personally I would not burn pine unless it was an emergency.
Old 08-30-2010, 10:21 PM
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I live in Montana and we burn pine in our stoves all the time. Dry the wood out first through the year. It should be fine.
Old 08-30-2010, 10:38 PM
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"Ditto" death2uniform
Cut the pine this year to burn next year, it will be fine.
I have two wood stoves and an Earth Log Furnace and I burn pine with no problem.
What type of pine do you have, Lodgepole, Ponderossa ?
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Old 08-30-2010, 10:53 PM
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make sure to burn the fires hot. hotter the fire (to a point obviously) the less build up you will have. we have our chimney checked about twice a decade and we have virtually no build up (and we use the woodstove a lot). and we burn all sorts of wood.
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Old 08-30-2010, 11:02 PM
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Bad idea ... bad, bad idea ...
Old 08-30-2010, 11:07 PM
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I've burned seasoned pine many times, the only problem is it burns fast and hot.If you fill the stove like you would with hard wood it will burn very fast, you have to constantly feed it a stick or two at a time.
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Old 08-30-2010, 11:08 PM
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As long as the pine is dry, its fine. We have always burned 50/50 pine hardwood but it needs to be dry...not green or rich. I clean my stove pipe every fall and ive never had a problem burning dry pine.
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Old 08-30-2010, 11:09 PM
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We burn a mix of pine and aspen. Most in this area burn only pine. No hardwoods to speak of here. As stated: Use well seasoned wood, get the fire hot regularly, clean the pipe regularly. The occasional chimney fires I hear of are do to poor chimney maintenance. Make sure you clean the chimney from where it exits the stove to the very top.
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Old 08-30-2010, 11:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Warrior View Post
"Ditto" death2uniform
Cut the pine this year to burn next year, it will be fine.
I have two wood stoves and an Earth Log Furnace and I burn pine with no problem.
What type of pine do you have, Lodgepole, Ponderossa ?
Loblolly pine.
Old 08-30-2010, 11:18 PM
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My family burned pine as our main wood, and we never - quite - succeeded in burning down the house, despite my step-father's reluctance to clean the chimney.

Make sure you burn only DRY wood, dampness and greenness can lead to smoldering, and smoldering is not good. Burn a small, hot fire so less creosote goes up the flue. There are cleaning logs that supposedly keep your chimney clear, but from the reports I've seen they'll actually mainly just reduce buildup, not prevent it. Since you're apparently building your own cabin, you've got a LOT of room to maneuver and get things right, so do so. Take pains to make sure the chimney pipe (if you're using pipe and not a masonary chimney) is of the best materials, well insulated, double or even triple walled, installed properly with as few bends as possible. The stovepipe (connecting the stove to the chimney) should come nowhere near anything flamable. and there should be a non-flamable surface like brick under the stovepipe and stove. Build the roof - or platforms on the roof - so it's easy to reach the chimney and you'll have no problems removing the cap (or the top section of the chimney if you make it really high) and shoving a chimney brush down inside to clean it (if you have to risk life and limb cleaning the chimney you probably won't do it often and that will increase your risk). Keep a fire extinguisher or five near at hand, occasionally burn hardwood to reduce accumualtions, and don't burn paper in the stove, flaming pieces can get whipped up the chimney by the updraft, shoot out the top, and - still burning - settle on your roof...
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Old 08-30-2010, 11:18 PM
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All we have is pine...thousands and thousands of acres of dead pine trees thanks to the pine beetle infestation. Burning it is fine...I have been doing it for 30 years BUT...it's dry (green stuff doesn't burn anyway) AND the stove flue goes straight from the top of the stove through the roof; no elbows; this makes a big difference and it's much safer. Elbowed flues work but they definatly get much more creosote in them. Hot fires help, as do those flue cleaning chrystals. My neighbor (a very old bush guy) climbs his roof each spring with a log chain in hand... Lowers the chain down the flue and "rattles it clean". Works great! Remember that flue pipes have to be set up so that the creosote will drip down the pipe and back into the stove...not so that it will leak out around the seams. Make sure you install the flue that way. You would think that you would put the pipe together the other way so smoke going up the flue won't escape through the joints but you don't.

So...dry pine; straight flue; and clean your flue annually and you should be fine.
Old 08-31-2010, 12:50 AM
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cured (dry) pine is much better. straight flue idea is interesting.
since, it seems, you don't have a stove yet, i'd go real insulative around the combustion chamber (decreases creosote), and double walled down draft wood-gassifier for best efficiency and the least creosote as you will have (nearly) complete combustion. check out the rocket stoves for cooking (insulated), or rocket stove mass heater for cooking AND heating your cabin/greenhouse at the same time. maybe a rocket stove mass heater for shoulder/winter seasons and a just outside the kitchen window dakota hole for the hot summer to cook on???

I built a rocket stove mass heater for my brother's cabin, while snaking the stovepipe below ground in the cabin, as a cob raised bed platform, and then out the cabin wall and under the raised outdoor garden bed (easy to raise with the thermal mass stovepipe!). worked great. he burns maybe half pine, hardly any creosote after all these years. also has hardly to no smoke--just steam
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Old 08-31-2010, 01:20 AM
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They do it all the time here in Oregon. Just make sure it's seasoned. I thought it was crazy coming from Texas where we burned oak. I thought, "man, these are some crazy a$$ people up here burning that garbage wood in their stoves. they're asking for a fire for sure." After talking to a few of the local old timers, I found out that as long as it's seasoned and burns hot, you are good to go. Why not stock some extra pipe if you're skeptical?
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Old 08-31-2010, 01:35 AM
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Pine is not a problem.

Improperly maintained equipment is a problem.

Get yourself a set of these: http://www.woodlanddirect.com/Chimne...ng-Kit-36-Rods

NOTE: You can find 'em a lot cheaper than that.

And a small gage chain in a length that will reach from the top of the pipe on the roof all the way down to the stove -- I use a long dog chain.

The chain is dropped down the pipe (hold on to one end), and beat the snot outta the pipe by shaking it in the pipe and beating the sides. This works loose the really stuck, hard stuff.

Followup with the poles and brushes to clean 'r out real good.

I do mine twice a year. Once in the spring after the thaw, and once in early winter before the snow flies (we generally heat for a month or three before the snow/ice hits and I don't want to be up on the roof with it all iced up).

I sank 3 large eye bolts in the roof to tie off my climbing harness. Wouldn't want to kill myself saving a buck on a chimney sweep.

For the price of one "professional" cleaning, I got all the tools myself, including the climbing rig (harness, rope, caribeeners, etc. to tie off safely) AND, it gets cleaner than it would if I hired a so-called "professional".

They charge $185 'round here - for *one* cleaning and I do it twice a year. That's ridiculous.


Furthermore: Stay away from the chemical logs, sticks, powders, and other junk you throw on the fire. They are useless. They are junk. They are a waste of both your time and your money.

Additionally, ensure you burn one good hot fire a day. Slow smoldering fires means smoke. Smoke means creosote buildup. A good hot fire burns off the tars and creosotes from last night's midnight smolder. At least once a day, fire that puppy up 'til it burns like the fires of Hades and let it roar for a good half hour.
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Old 08-31-2010, 01:51 AM
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Pretty much any type of DRY, SEASONED wood is OK to burn in your stove. It's the wet or sappy stuff that causes the biggest hazard of creosote buildup and chimney fires.

Pine doesn't provide much in terms of BTU value. You'll go through it a LOT faster than hardwood.
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