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Old 05-07-2008, 02:10 PM
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Default Food Storage for the Diabetic?



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The long term food storage items that I have are mainly rice, wheat, beans, oats and things like that. They are sealed in # 10 cans and are supposeed to be good for 30 years if kept in a dry cool place. I was showing my father some of the items in my food storage (he is starting to get interested in long term food storage) and he noticed that most everything I had was high in carbs. My father is a type 2 diabetic and has to have insulin. He has a stash that will last a couple months but if TSHTF real bad and he has to dip into these high carb items it will cause him to use more insulin which means he will run out quicker. If it becomes difficult to get insulin then this presents a very big problem. Does anyone know of a site that might sell low carb food storage items? Does anyone have any suggestions? Thanks in advance for any info.

Tbull
Old 05-07-2008, 03:02 PM
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I would suggest that you contact either a local Red Cross group that has a dietician or contact the people at FEMA who can put you in contact with a diet expert who works for them. Both groups probably have experts somewhere in their structures that can guide you to the right stuff you need for your father. I am sure that both the American Red Cross, not the local one, and FEMA has bumped into this situation a couple of times and they may already have the information you need on file.

The next thing that you do is google the topic that you are interested in to see if somebody, somewhere may also have thought this situation out before you did. More than likely, it's out there along the information highway somewhere so all you need to do is find it. It may take a while though.

The last thing, go to a GNC store (General Nutrion Center store) and ask them about low carb food sources. While you are there, also ask about stuff that they sell which could be used in an emergency to temporarily augment or substitute for insulin. If you don't have any GNC stores near you, any health food store will probably be able to help you out as far as information on low carb foods and substitutes.

Just so you know... I have to take a prescription potassium pill every day to keep my heart beating. I did some research on the pill that I take and found out that GNC sells the same type of pill without a prescription in the same dosage that I need made by the same company. The neat part is that I can get the GNC pill without a prescription being needed. If something does happen, I plan to make the GNC pill my replacement for my regular scripted med.
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Old 05-07-2008, 05:26 PM
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Most commercial Survival Food plans are very heavy on grain starches and sugars because the supply the most calories for the buck. At 2000 calories per day and these are very minimal for those who plan to be active in gardening, wood chopping and all the hand labor necessary in a grid down existence where 2500 to 3000 would be more like it. Fortunately, most of us are carrying several months worth stored energy around with us. .

What does that leave us to eat then? basically a low-carbohydrate, high-protein, high-fat diet. Ok lets look at this:
1. green vegetables (broccoli, green beans, spinach and cabbage).
2. real meats/TVP (beef, pork, chicken and fish)
3. high protein foods (eggs, cheese)
4. fats: (butter, shortening and vegetable oils)
5. moderate amounts of fruits and legumes
6. limited amounts of starchy vegetables (carrots, potatoes, yams, parsnips), grains


Reducing Insulin Requirements & Blood Sugar levels

For Type 2 Diabetics
1. Eat small meals 5 times during the day and eat as slowly as possible. If your are still producing some of you own insulin, you my be able to stretch your supplemental supply considerably this way.
2. Dr. Jonathan Wright suggests diabetics have a daily intake of the following nutrients chromium 1000 to 2000 mg., Niacin 1.5 to 2.5 mg , Niacinamide 50 to 100 mg ,Biotin 8 to 16 mg., Alpha-lipoic- acid 300 mg., Co-Enzyme Q 10-60 mg. Vitamin K 5 to 10 mg., Vitamin D -2000 I.U. daily, Vitamin E (as mixed tocopherols) 400 IU, Vitamin C 2000-3000 mg., Magnesium 300-400 mg., Vanadium 1-2 mg., Zinc 30 mg. Copper 2 mg., Manganese 5-10 mg.,
a. Most supplements will lack a few of these ingredients which can be added from another source.
b. Use only butter, olive oil, and coconut oil for cooking.
3. A current study among Finnish men and women between the ages of 35, with no history type 2 diabetes, where followed for about 12 years. Those who drank three to four cups of coffee per day had a 27 to 29 percent reduced risk of diabetes. Those who drank at least 10 cups a day had a 55 to 79 percent reduced risk.* Adding one additional cup of coffee per day was associated with a .16-units higher insulin sensitivity.
a. Note: Except men who drank pot-boiled coffee, who faced three times the risk of diabetes compared to men who drank filtered coffee. Which may have to do with the length of time the coffee was exposed to high temperatures.
4. Tea consumption was also related to improved insulin sensitivity.
5. 1/2 tsp of cinnamon per day (on toast, in coffee, etc) will lower insulin requirements and also lowers cholesterol.
6. Vinegar can flatten out glucose spikes in your blood as it slows down the digestion of carbohydrates. Just using vinegar on a salad or a teaspoon in a small glass of water ahead of a moderate carbohydrate meal seems to flatten the blood sugar out and give the pancreas a chance to catch up.
7. James Duke in The Green Pharmacy suggests drinking lots of
a. black tea as it significantly reduces blood sugar levels
b. Insulinade (even better!) To a pot of black tea add a pinch each of bay leaf, cinnamon, cloves, and tumeric, and steep for 10 minutes.
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Old 05-07-2008, 08:18 PM
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Lots, although not all, of people with Type II diabetes can manage relatively well using a balance of diet and exercise. I'm not a nutritionist, but I think that a consultation with a nutritionist about non-meds diabetes management might benefit your father.

One of the really key aspects of managing diabetes are tests for hemoglobin A1C, microalbumin, blood pressure and BMI, on at least a quarterly basis. BP and BMI are easy to monitor without medical professionals, but it might be possible to set up a "mini-lab" to monitor hemoglobin (blood test) and microalbumin (pee test) on your own. This wouldn't solve the problem of knowing how to adjust diet based on the test results--this would take some more serious learning about diabetes--but it should be possible. Also, if your dad tests his blood sugar, it makes sense to stock up on 2-3 testers (most are battery operated--so get rechargable batteries) and 1,000s of test strips.

Foot exams are a really good indicator of peripheral necropathy that might, if not addressed, require amputation, These tests are pretty easy to do--I'd check WebMD or some similar source for actual procedures and remedies for signs of necropathy. Blindness
(retinopathy) should also be tested for, but this requires some pretty specialised equipment and may not be practical for DIY medical care.

I believe there is now an insulin product that requires only very slight refridgeration--not sure what the name is--but it's worth looking in to.

The good news is that Type II diabetes is very manageable! Perhaps even in a SHTF scenario.

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Old 05-08-2008, 07:40 AM
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Stock up on canned meats and veggies and TVP (meat and tvp being high protein, low carb, and veggies being high fiber low-*er* carb... fiber consumed with the meal helps with insulin response- beans are good for this too) Have him actually try some of the things you have in storage and test to see how they affect his levels specifically. Also- have him talk to his doctor and perhaps start keeping a stock of fenugreek (and growing some). http://www.diabeteshealth.com/read/2005/01/01/4193.html

And- try to encourage him to get serious about exercise and dropping any excess weight. Many diabetics can reduce or even *eliminate* insulin dependancy simply by getting into shape. (NOT all- but hey- it's worth a shot!)

Edited to add *cinnamon*- it also helps improve insulin sensitivity- a teaspoon every day is great to have in the supply list



Quote:
Originally Posted by TBULL55 View Post
The long term food storage items that I have are mainly rice, wheat, beans, oats and things like that. They are sealed in # 10 cans and are supposeed to be good for 30 years if kept in a dry cool place. I was showing my father some of the items in my food storage (he is starting to get interested in long term food storage) and he noticed that most everything I had was high in carbs. My father is a type 2 diabetic and has to have insulin. He has a stash that will last a couple months but if TSHTF real bad and he has to dip into these high carb items it will cause him to use more insulin which means he will run out quicker. If it becomes difficult to get insulin then this presents a very big problem. Does anyone know of a site that might sell low carb food storage items? Does anyone have any suggestions? Thanks in advance for any info.

Tbull
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Old 05-08-2008, 08:54 AM
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Thank you all for the helpful information. Dad is not overweight at all and exercises regularly. He checks his blood sugar regularly and eats lower carb meals, he does eat some carb stuff (he doesn't do the atkins type deal), but stays way away from rice. Rice seems to really drive his blood sugar up and keep it there, it takes alot of insulin to get it back into range. I should also tell you all that dad wears an insulin pump. The pump slowly gives you your needed insulin over a period of time instead of spiking with the shots. This pump has really made things alot better for dad. When he does eat high carb items, pasta, ice cream, rice, and things like that, he figures up the carbs and plugs into the pump how much insulin he should need to keep his blood sugar in range and the pump gives him regular doses over a certain time period. This works great for the most part, some things just drive the blood sugar through the roof and it takes a long time to get it back down. I will pass on the information you all have shared with me. My father and I thank you.

Tbull
Old 05-08-2008, 09:01 AM
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You might ask him to try some quinoa... If he doesn't do well with rice, it's a crapshoot, but quinoa does have alot more protein and *may* react differently in his system. It's worth a shot- quinoa is cheap and stores great like any other whole grain... http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-C00001-01c21U1.html



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Originally Posted by TBULL55 View Post
Thank you all for the helpful information. Dad is not overweight at all and exercises regularly. He checks his blood sugar regularly and eats lower carb meals, he does eat some carb stuff (he doesn't do the atkins type deal), but stays way away from rice. Rice seems to really drive his blood sugar up and keep it there, it takes alot of insulin to get it back into range. I should also tell you all that dad wears an insulin pump. The pump slowly gives you your needed insulin over a period of time instead of spiking with the shots. This pump has really made things alot better for dad. When he does eat high carb items, pasta, ice cream, rice, and things like that, he figures up the carbs and plugs into the pump how much insulin he should need to keep his blood sugar in range and the pump gives him regular doses over a certain time period. This works great for the most part, some things just drive the blood sugar through the roof and it takes a long time to get it back down. I will pass on the information you all have shared with me. My father and I thank you.

Tbull
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Old 05-08-2008, 09:54 AM
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When my friends and I were doing our weekly "What Ifs?" we talked about my friend the diabetic. He knows that in a very severe SHTF senario he will probably croak quickly due to lack of injectable insulin. I don't believe that insulin has a high shelf life. We did look up how to make your own insulin. It is a very involved process but can be done. You need lots of chemicals and some equipment but that just gives diabetics some option...
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Old 05-08-2008, 12:39 PM
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he should also stock up on blood sugar testing equipment.
he should also do some testing with the storage food NOW before SHTF.

id stock up on protein powders, protein bars, canned meats(tuna,chicken,ham,turkey), canned veggies(low starch variety), oils and vitamins/minerals which help control blood sugar.

There is a supplement out there called ALA (alpha Lipoic acid) that he should definitely look into as well as chromium and other supplements.

Also exercising especially INTENSE exercising can dramatically increase the muscles insulin sensitivity which will help him extended his insulin use and keep his overall blood sugar levels.

again start prepping/testing now and figure out what combination of preps will suit him best.
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Old 05-08-2008, 02:17 PM
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Quote:
don't believe that insulin has a high shelf life.
Bobo, I have done some research here and, at around 42oF (do not let freeze), insulin will keep at least 1 year and, although the pharmacies won't tell you this, up to near 3 years. Watch for any cloudiness, it must stay perfectly clear to be safe. Unlike most medicines it does not just get weaker, insulin when cloudy becomes hazardous.

For Type 1 Diabetics
1. There does not seem to be a feasible way make or a substitute for insulin.
2. Insulin can be stored in a refrigerator (35 to 46 degrees F), unopened, and maintain potency until the expiration date on the package.
3. It may be used beyond the expiration date for an additional year or until it becomes cloudy but no MD would recommend that. In a situation where it is use it or die without it, you will have little choice.
4. Insulin products may be left un-refrigerated (between 59 and 86 degrees F) for up to 28 days and still maintain potency.
5. Under emergency conditions, when the storage temperatures might exceed even 86 degrees F, insulin exposed to these temperatures may still need to be used but it may lose potency.
6. A 6 pack cooler-sized refrigerators that run off 12V DC that run off solar cells or car battery recharged by solar cells.
7. A solar-powered refrigerator with its own collector, the SunDanzer BFR105 Battery-Free (PV Direct) model, at $1199, has ultra low energy consumption, is 3.7 cf. (41W x 31 D x 39H inches) and 200 lbs
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Old 05-19-2008, 09:05 AM
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Three food items and one herb can help control blood sugar.

1. Nopales, prickly pear, cactus or "tunas" in Spanish can lower your blood sugar. Many diabetics can not eat a lot of these because it lowers their blood sugar TO much. The grow all over the southwest and can be found in the grocery store alongside the pickled jalapenos and carrots. The fruit is delicious but has many seeds in it. The leaves themselves when sliced up and boiled or pickled taste similar to greenbeans.
2. Stevia or stevia extract is a sweetener made from the extract of the stevia plant. It also will lower the blood sugar.
3. Cinnamon will lower bloodsugar and spike insulin levels in the bloodstream.
4. Devils club is an American plant that grows all over. The Indians used to use it to control blood sugar levels as well. (They didn't know the science behind it but they knew what when to use it.)

So if you are diabetic you might want to research some of these on your own and stock up.
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