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Old 07-05-2010, 04:21 PM
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Default Is it safe to eat a Prairie Dog?



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The "Is it safe to eat a squirrel?" thread got me thinking. We don't have any squirrels around here but there are TONS of prairie dogs. In our small town I think rabbit and prairie dog would be the SHTF mainstay of most "urban" hunters. I know they can carry plague (like most rodents), but I'm wondering if propery cooked would they pose a health risk?

Serious question that I hope I never have to find out the answer to on a firsthand basis. Thanks in advance.
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Old 07-05-2010, 04:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyjump136 View Post
The "Is it safe to eat a squirrel?" thread got me thinking. We don't have any squirrels around here but there are TONS of prairie dogs. In our small town I think rabbit and prairie dog would be the SHTF mainstay of most "urban" hunters. I know they can carry plague (like most rodents), but I'm wondering if propery cooked would they pose a health risk?

Serious question that I hope I never have to find out the answer to on a firsthand basis. Thanks in advance.
If the animal you shoot is healthy it will be good to eat. Prarie Dogs should tatse somewhat like squirrel. I'd give it a go.
Old 07-05-2010, 04:32 PM
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if you cook anything long enuff you can eat it
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Old 07-05-2010, 04:49 PM
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All mammals are edible,some just taste better than others. Unless it is sick it should be fine. TP
Old 07-05-2010, 04:52 PM
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I'de cook it to perfection and eat it. Sure they have been eaten, and enjoyed. I even saw a show about it once.
Old 07-05-2010, 05:00 PM
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All wild animals have different bacteria in their bodies, then a domesticated animal that has had shots for several different kind of ailments. Having said that, after you have cleaned and cooked this animal properly, you might become ill eatting a wild animal but it would be an illness from your body trying to adjust to this kind of food.

Like some people have a hard time adjusting to spring water after city water. Or some people experience altitude sickness because they have gone from a low altitude to a high altitude.

Some times a new experience brings on a negative reaction in the body.
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Old 07-05-2010, 05:16 PM
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Yeah! Like I Live in the Mountains, in Vermont, and have three Cold Water Springs on my Property. I eat Squirrels, Snakes, Gound Hogs,ie; Woodchuck, White Tail Deer, Native Vegetation and Such.
Just Cook the crap out of Stuff you are unsure of. Most Organisms you will encounter on Earth are easily broken down into Carbon.
Old 07-05-2010, 07:20 PM
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Prairie Dogs are very susceptible to bubonic plague

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/plague/qa.htm

Bon Appetit!
Old 07-05-2010, 07:53 PM
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Prarie dogs are suseptable to plague, but they quickly die from it. However, you need to be very careful to not get any of their fleas or ticks on you, that will carry the plague to you faster than eating a well-cooked P-dog will.
As mentioned, all furry critters are edible. That just means that if you cook them well, you can eat them and get some nourishment and they won't make you sick. It don't necessarily mean they taste good. P-dogs are just rodents, like squirrel, rabbit, guinea pigs, etc. and they pretty much all taste alike. A little bottle of hot sauce, or squeeze packet of slasa helps a lot sometimes.
Old 07-06-2010, 02:30 PM
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It's the fleas that they carry that are the real worry. The meat will be safe to eat after cooking, but you could easily contract a disease if one of their fleas bite you. Take precautions.
Old 07-06-2010, 08:23 PM
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It's the fleas that they carry that are the real worry. The meat will be safe to eat after cooking, but you could easily contract a disease if one of their fleas bite you. Take precautions.

I saw an article about ground squirrels closing a national park becuase they carry the plague but not Prarie Dogs....2 different animals. The flees dont have the disease they they transmit it with their bite. Again if the animal is healthy you should be able to cook it well and eat it. If it is not healthy don't mess with it.
Old 07-06-2010, 08:39 PM
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I've never ate one. However when the SHTF the only mammal I wont kill cook and eat is Human.
Old 07-07-2010, 12:12 AM
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I've never ate one. However when the SHTF the only mammal I wont kill cook and eat is Human.
I think this is a quote from a diary found at the Donner Party camp.
Old 07-07-2010, 12:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyjump136 View Post
The "Is it safe to eat a squirrel?" thread got me thinking. We don't have any squirrels around here but there are TONS of prairie dogs. In our small town I think rabbit and prairie dog would be the SHTF mainstay of most "urban" hunters. I know they can carry plague (like most rodents), but I'm wondering if propery cooked would they pose a health risk?

Serious question that I hope I never have to find out the answer to on a firsthand basis. Thanks in advance.
Dunno.

how long ago did you run it over with the truck?

Old 07-07-2010, 01:08 PM
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Just a question. What types of precautions would a person take to avoid fleas or ticks when you are skinning an animal? This could apply to all mammals. Thanks.
Old 07-07-2010, 01:41 PM
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Just a question. What types of precautions would a person take to avoid fleas or ticks when you are skinning an animal? This could apply to all mammals. Thanks.
Interesting question, and I would like to hear some thoughts on it.

I have killed, gutted, transported and eaten deer, antelope, elk, ducks, geese, pheasant, chuckar, quail, and rabbits and never thought twice about taking any precautions in regards to ticks and fleas.

Is there something unique about squirrels and prairie dogs that would warrant extra care when handling them?
Old 07-07-2010, 07:29 PM
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Nothing unique, fleas and ticks can inhabit any mammal. I nearly always find ticks on elk and deer while field dressing them. also rabbits, squirrels and other game.
I think the best way to avoid fleas and ticks is to field dress the animal very quickly and get rid of the pelt. An alternative is to let the animal lie for a few hours and cool some, then drag it off several yards and dress it out. Reason for these procedures is that fleas and ticks are VERY perceptive of the temperature of their host. Immediately the host begins to cool, even by a degree or two, they start to leave and look for greener pastures. If you're handy, they'll as likely get on you as anything else.
Small animals, like rabbits, I usually dress immediately and get rid of hitchhikers with the skin. Large animals, like elk, I usually let lay for a couple hours, then drag them off several yards and dress them out. I've found a flea or two on me afterwards, but never a problem, considering how many animals I've dressed out over the years.
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