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Old 06-21-2010, 08:16 PM
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Default Rape Plant, easy to grow, annual, edible.



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I have recently eaten some of this plant from the mustard family. Not bitter easy to grow & harvest and its annual. What say you?
Old 06-21-2010, 08:42 PM
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I would be cautious. Rape is a mustard, and in theory all mustards are edible. However... if you are talking about wild rape it has an irritating oil (erucic acid) that is cancer causing, specifically lung cancer when the seed oil is used for cooking. The rape that has been bred and genetically modified to produce Canola oil has erucic acid as well, but to a lesser degree and that is, in theory, processed out (a controversal issue. Some think Canola oil has transfats and is still not good to consume. For example, farmers will not feed Canola oil to cattle because with it in their diet they do not thrive.)

If I were living in the northern US or southern Canada that is raising rape for Canola then there's probably nothing wrong with cooking some up and enjoying mustard greens, through raw it could up set the tummy (non-fatally.) If the rape is not an escaped cultivated rape I would get an exact species identification and check it out further.

Generally mustards are fine as a seasonal green or an annual crop and can be boiled as a green or eaten raw in what ever amounts your stomach can tolerate. Like many seed oils, the oil is not bad in situ, in the plant itself when you eat it in minor quantities. Where it becomes a health issue is when it is used enmass, as a cooking oil. Rape is on the fringe of edibility. I am not saying don't. I am saying check it out and be careful.

Last edited by Straight Razor; 06-22-2010 at 08:16 AM..
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Old 06-21-2010, 11:13 PM
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I think I'd plant amaranth instead. Last summer was my first experience with growing it. It literally grows like a weed. Isn't picky about soil, climate or conditions. Has few pests or diseases. Grows fast, so you can harvest leaves all season. Is highly nutritious and tasty. Then to top it all off, it produces a prodigious crop of seeds. The seeds are some of the few complete proteins in the plant kingdom, and they're danged good eating too.

The stems have a wonderful texture and a flavor like asparagus with a hint of horseradish. The leaves are rich tasting greens. It's something no survival garden should be without, in my opinion.
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Old 06-22-2010, 12:02 AM
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I think I'd plant amaranth instead. Last summer was my first experience with growing it. It literally grows like a weed. Isn't picky about soil, climate or conditions. Has few pests or diseases. Grows fast, so you can harvest leaves all season. Is highly nutritious and tasty. Then to top it all off, it produces a prodigious crop of seeds. The seeds are some of the few complete proteins in the plant kingdom, and they're danged good eating too.

The stems have a wonderful texture and a flavor like asparagus with a hint of horseradish. The leaves are rich tasting greens. It's something no survival garden should be without, in my opinion.
Amaranth grows wild here and most places in the US. It's sometimes known as pigweed, although that name applies to more than one type of plant. It's draught tolerant and keeps its own amongst the rest of the weeds. They say one plant can have 50,000-100,000 seeds or more! Amaranth has a red variety which I am growing for the first time in my garden, otherwise called "Love-lies-bleeding". It makes a gorgeous background planting, I'm told, although mine has just started as seedlings. I'm going to scatter some of the seeds in a meadow in back of my place when they produce...it will be easily seen! The seeds can be popped like popcorn too!
Dock, either curly dock or yellow dock, is a similar plant that also grows wild and has both edible greens and seeds. Dock is one of my favorites as "spinach".
Rape takes some commercial processing to turn into canola oil, amaranth doesn't require that level of processing to be used. Amaranth would be my choice too. Amaranth and quinoa are the two plants highest in protein.
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Old 06-22-2010, 08:19 AM
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Amaranth and quinoa are the two plants highest in protein.
When referring to grains yes. Right up there with them is Apios americana, or ground nut. It's 15% protein as well.
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Old 06-22-2010, 08:27 AM
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Every second field over here is yellow now becaues of rape seed plants. We use it as bio diesel. I never realised it was edible.
Old 06-22-2010, 10:45 AM
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Amaranth grows wild here and most places in the US. It's sometimes known as pigweed, although that name applies to more than one type of plant. It's draught tolerant and keeps its own amongst the rest of the weeds. They say one plant can have 50,000 seeds or more! Amaranth has a red variety which I am growing for the first time in my garden, otherwise called "Love-lies-bleeding". It makes a gorgeous background planting, I'm told, although mine has just started as seedlings. I'm going to scatter some of the seeds in a meadow in back of my place when they produce...it will be easily seen! The seeds can be popped like popcorn too!
Dock, either curly dock or yellow dock, is a similar plant that also grows wild and has both edible greens and seeds. Dock is one of my favorites as "spinach".
Rape takes some commercial processing to turn into canola oil, amaranth doesn't require that level of processing to be used. Amaranth would be my choice too. Amaranth and quinoa are the two plants highest in protein.
I grew the red amaranth last year, myself. My soil was absolutely horrible. Pure, salty clay. It was my first garden at that location and the soil needed a lot of work. It grew wonderfully and was my top success story in that pitiful garden.

I'm surprised it's not more popular with gardeners, and especially with survivalists. A plant that grows that easily and quickly, provides nutritious vegetables all summer, then ends with a spectacular amount of high protein grains deserves more recognition than it gets!

I'm going to have to plant dock one of these times and try it. It doesn't grow wild in my area. It sounds like another ideal survival and general eating plant.
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Old 06-22-2010, 11:33 AM
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It is also grown for cattle feed.
Old 06-22-2010, 11:41 AM
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It is also grown for cattle feed.
That would be a surprise. Ususally the mustards are not cattle food because it can flavor the meat and in dairy the milk.
Old 06-22-2010, 12:19 PM
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As for the rapeseed plant - stay away from it. The oil produced from the plant was originally for machinery, not consumption. Most cattle won't eat it and even bugs stay away from it. Canola oil, the name comes from Canadian Oil Less Acidic. Or something like that.

But I'm sure Straight Razor could give much better info than me. BTW, Straight Razor, I was pleasantly surprised to learn that you are "that guy" from YouTube. Great work, I enjoy them!

Amaranth - (thanks Mike) Ironically I was thinking about starting a thread about Amaranth or more specifically Celosia or as some may call it Cockscomb. Amaranth and Celosia are both members of the same family and are both edible. I have grown celosia for years and it is a hardy, drought tolerant and quite pretty flower. They take very little care, wildlife (deer) leave it alone and it reseeds itself every year. I actually have a bit of a problem controlling in it some areas of the yard. You can buy it at nearly any garden store.

...I think I may still start a thread so others that might not visit this one can learn about it also.
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Old 06-22-2010, 12:39 PM
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I don't think I'd trust this plant around my wife or daughters...
Old 06-22-2010, 02:06 PM
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As for the rapeseed plant - stay away from it. The oil produced from the plant was originally for machinery, not consumption. Most cattle won't eat it and even bugs stay away from it. Canola oil, the name comes from Canadian Oil Less Acidic. Or something like that.

But I'm sure Straight Razor could give much better info than me. BTW, Straight Razor, I was pleasantly surprised to learn that you are "that guy" from YouTube. Great work, I enjoy them!

Amaranth - (thanks Mike) Ironically I was thinking about starting a thread about Amaranth or more specifically Celosia or as some may call it Cockscomb. Amaranth and Celosia are both members of the same family and are both edible. I have grown celosia for years and it is a hardy, drought tolerant and quite pretty flower. They take very little care, wildlife (deer) leave it alone and it reseeds itself every year. I actually have a bit of a problem controlling in it some areas of the yard. You can buy it at nearly any garden store.

...I think I may still start a thread so others that might not visit this one can learn about it also.
Thanks, Diddy...I would be interested in that thread.
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Old 06-22-2010, 02:22 PM
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Thanks, Diddy...I would be interested in that thread.
I put it in the gardening section and added some more info to it.
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Old 06-22-2010, 03:54 PM
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Just an FYI, I had quinoa the other day, and it was delicious! Has a great texture and is great with beets. Kind of tasted tea-like, but not in any overbearing or negative way. Instead, it was like "oh, this is nice, and it tastes a little bit like tea. How pleasant!"
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Old 06-22-2010, 04:10 PM
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Old 06-22-2010, 04:50 PM
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Yes , Pudding,,,this plant i ate came from the seed...My bud planted it for deer, i dont know how much of it they ate, becuase they ate other things in his garden, but, he says his japanese wife says its eaten regularly in japan.
I didnt find anything thing encouraging online (rape) is the reason i was asking.

My SUPERNATURAL POWERS could use a boosting, ill look into this Amaranth.


Amaranth (Amaranthus) has a colorful history, is highly nutritious, and the plant itself is extremely attractive and useful. Amaranth was a staple in the diets of pre-Columbian Aztecs, who believed it had SUPERNATURAL POWERS and incorporated it into their religious ceremonies. Before the Spanish conquest in 1519, amaranth was associated with human sacrifice and the Aztec women made a mixture of ground amaranth seed, honey or human blood then shaped this mixture into idols that were eaten ceremoniously. This practice appalled the conquistadors who reasoned that eliminating the amaranth would also eliminate the sacrifices. The grain was forbidden by the Spanish, and consequently fell into obscurity for hundreds of years. If not for the fact that the cultivation of amaranth continued in a few remote areas of the Andes and Mexico, it may have become extinct and completely lost to us.
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Old 06-22-2010, 07:45 PM
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Just an FYI, I had quinoa the other day, and it was delicious! Has a great texture and is great with beets. Kind of tasted tea-like, but not in any overbearing or negative way. Instead, it was like "oh, this is nice, and it tastes a little bit like tea. How pleasant!"
Huh, glad you liked it. I have a couple boxes in the cupboard and won't touch the stuff unless I have to. ...but that's just me

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Yes , Pudding,,,this plant i ate came from the seed...My bud planted it for deer, i dont know how much of it they ate, becuase they ate other things in his garden, but, he says his japanese wife says its eaten regularly in japan.
I didnt find anything thing encouraging online (rape) is the reason i was asking.

My SUPERNATURAL POWERS could use a boosting, ill look into this Amaranth.


Amaranth (Amaranthus) has a colorful history, is highly nutritious, and the plant itself is extremely attractive and useful. Amaranth was a staple in the diets of pre-Columbian Aztecs, who believed it had SUPERNATURAL POWERS and incorporated it into their religious ceremonies. Before the Spanish conquest in 1519, amaranth was associated with human sacrifice and the Aztec women made a mixture of ground amaranth seed, honey or human blood then shaped this mixture into idols that were eaten ceremoniously. This practice appalled the conquistadors who reasoned that eliminating the amaranth would also eliminate the sacrifices. The grain was forbidden by the Spanish, and consequently fell into obscurity for hundreds of years. If not for the fact that the cultivation of amaranth continued in a few remote areas of the Andes and Mexico, it may have become extinct and completely lost to us.
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Old 06-22-2010, 08:01 PM
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That would be a surprise. Ususally the mustards are not cattle food because it can flavor the meat and in dairy the milk.

Well, surprise, surprise. Rape is a brassica (in the mustard family) much like a turnip. It is planted in late summer as a fall forage crop for livestock. It can be grown on dry soil that will not support the growth of alfalfa or clover. Matures fast and is high in protein. We used to plant rape or turnips in dry years when we didn't have enough other hay.

Have a read here:
http://www.umass.edu/cdl/publications/Brassica.htm

Also called Chinese Cabbage in China. http://www.sunnygardens.com/garden_p...ssica_0491.php
Old 06-22-2010, 08:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GunGourd View Post
Just an FYI, I had quinoa the other day, and it was delicious! Has a great texture and is great with beets. Kind of tasted tea-like, but not in any overbearing or negative way. Instead, it was like "oh, this is nice, and it tastes a little bit like tea. How pleasant!"
Quinoa just is a texture thing or something for me...I just don't care much for it. I will be getting some amaranth seeds, and trying those next season.
Old 06-22-2010, 08:07 PM
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I just ordered some from dianes seeds....
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