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Old 06-19-2010, 12:04 PM
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thinking of making a small home made wood or charcoal burning stove for cooking.maybe out of a coffee can or something similar .any pics of your versions or helpful hints would be welcomed.i want it to be lightweight portable for a bob or bov.
Old 06-19-2010, 12:50 PM
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I've been thinking about drawing up some plans to convert our electric cooking stove to a wood burning stove in the event of SHTF. Obviously without electricity it won't be doing us much good...

I think with proper venting and some modifications to the door this could be very possible.
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Old 06-19-2010, 02:03 PM
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http://zenstoves.net/Wood.htm

dunno if anything here will help you.. but there are some small usable ones listed that arent too hard to build.
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Old 06-19-2010, 02:53 PM
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Search youtube for woodgas stove, hobo stove and rocket stove. There are a ton of good ones on there.
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Old 06-19-2010, 03:16 PM
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I plan on building a rocket stove. Not only for using but also because I love the concept. Yes, I am easily entertained.
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Old 06-20-2010, 06:19 PM
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Take a can... cut a hole in the side.. to feed wood.. then poke smaller holes around the bottom so air can get in.. your done..
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Old 07-13-2010, 01:15 PM
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Try this site to build a stove. They have a basic one with free plans and then you can order their more complex one for $5
http://www.trailgear.org/
Old 07-13-2010, 09:02 PM
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Here are a couple links to a couple of my attempts.

The first one was using a 5 gallon metal bucket.

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=56743


The second was using a coffee can.

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=52298
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Old 01-19-2011, 02:51 PM
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Cool Wood stove idea

Tell me what you think of this. I have been wanting to build a woodstove for my garage in Texas. Not very cold here, so I do not need a superheater. But I want something novel.

I hit on the idea of turning an old fire hydrant on its side, unbolting the top and cutting the valve mechanism out of the inside. Then, what would be left is a cast iron pipe with a flange on each end, one hose fitting on each side of the pipe and a larger hose fitting in between. Then, weld up some simple legs with a U bracket in the middle to hold it up. On one end, a circular steel plate with a hinge and a latch will make the loading door. On the other end, a doughnut shaped plate with bolt holes to match the flange and a pyrex dish in the middle will create an inspection port. By removing the caps on each side where the hose threads are, I can drill holes in the pipe threads for draft controls. Finally, the large hose connection will have a steel plate welded over it to make a hot plate for cooking.

This is my biggest concern. The hydrant body is much thicker than an ordinary woodstove. Does that mean I will have to build a larger fire in it to feel the heat? Once it is hot, it will be a great heat sink and stay hot for a long time. But it may take a pretty big fire to get it hot. Any ideas?
Old 01-19-2011, 03:17 PM
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I have a double barrel woodstove in my shop and that thing thows out some serious heat. It will make my 40'x40'x10'high shop toasty warm in less than a half of an hour.

It is basically a kit that you provide 2 metal 55 gal drums to. It looks or seems big but it is a cost effective way to heat . I would mention that you should have a couple back up barrels as they last around 8-10 years. But the kit is all cast iron and wont wear out. Basically it stacks the two barrells horizontally and has feet, braces to stack the barrels , a door and hinges and a pipe to connect the two barrels.

The lower barrel is the burn chamber and the second barrel basically just captures the exhaust heat before it goes out the chimney. So you have the outside surface of two 55 gal drums throwing out heat.

Basically the kit is a little over a $100 I believe , the chimney will run around $100 for 1 story and you can buy used 4 metal barrels for a $100. So you have a $300 investment into a safe wood burning system.But it would need to sit on a non combustible surface of at least 8'x8' to be safe. You can purchase 1/2'' thick cement board to put underneath it on a wood type floor for under $40 and if you wanted it to look nice tile over the cement board.

I would worry about fire saftey issues when building any wood burning system and the chimney is a very important part of this. Wood burning chimneys have a specific rating and when you pass through ceilings , walls and roofs you need a rated multiple layer system to prevent burning down your building as there will most likely be no Fire Dept to come to the rescue. If you dont vent it right and your ceiling , wall or roof start on fire most of the time there is significant damage even if a fire dept responds quickly!

I would think you could utilize an electric stove as a burning chamber for a few years maybe if you are creative , have extra metal to beef up the top and have extra firesafe seals to seal the door. This is assuming you have a safe chimney system
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Old 01-19-2011, 03:58 PM
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read this and it might give you some other good ideas.
http://www.michaelyon-online.com/gobar-gas-ii.htm
Old 01-19-2011, 04:36 PM
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Here is our woodstove







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Old 01-21-2011, 07:49 PM
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Very cool. Can you explain a little bit about how you put it together?
Old 01-21-2011, 08:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pro-Pain View Post
Very cool. Can you explain a little bit about how you put it together?
Vogelzang is the name of the manufacturer. You can buy the kits from Northerntool.com

I get 55-gallon drums for free from a local twinky factory.

The bottom drum is lined with refractory cement. I laid it about 3/4" thick.

The upper drum lid has two black pipes on it. 2" pipes that go inside about 2 1/2', they are mounted with cast flanges and 3" long nipples on the outside so those end caps thread on. The idea was to get a way for fresh air to get sucked into the upper drum, to help with the secondary combustion.

It sits on a 8' by 8' cement pad. About 3/4" thick on top of our wood floor. dead center in the middle of our house where the ceiling is the highest at 14' high.

This model is rated to put out as much as 200kBtu [but that was before I added the secondary combustion]

Directly over head is a ceiling fan. I mean directly over it. It pushes air straight down over the stove and throws hot air out in all directions.

Then I coiled 50' of 3/4" copper tubing around the outside of the upper drum. Connected to cut-off valves and a pressure relief. Water circulates up from the crawl space, through the tubing and back down again. Downstairs I have 3 old water-heater tanks lined up in series along with a circ pump. They work as a thermal bank. They hold about 120 gallons and they store the heat from the stove.

We have two loops of circulating water. One loop has the stove [as heat source] and thermal bank. The second loop is a radiant floor system.

Underneath our floors we have PEX tubing installed to warm the floor. This loop includes a heated towel rack [for drying towels and wet clothing] and the seats / backs in our living room bench seats.



We rarely fire it up fully, it makes too much heat. But it is great for running with a small load of fuel.



I did not like the copper tubing on the outside, I felt that it did not put enough heat into the water. So this summer I took the copper tubing off and I put the coil inside the upper drum. Now this winter I have found that it adds a great deal more heat to the water. Though I have no photos of the modification.



My wife wants me to think about swinging the upper drum 180 degrees horizontally [to give access to the top of the bottom drum] and then laying a piece of flat 1/4" steel plate maybe a 3' by 6' square on the bottom drum. As a flat cooking grill. I would have to add a bunch of angle iron braces; some to support the upper drum in that position, and some to hold the grill.

Does that answer your question?
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Old 01-21-2011, 09:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nimmer View Post
I have a double barrel woodstove in my shop and that thing thows out some serious heat. It will make my 40'x40'x10'high shop toasty warm in less than a half of an hour.

It is basically a kit that you provide 2 metal 55 gal drums to. It looks or seems big but it is a cost effective way to heat . I would mention that you should have a couple back up barrels as they last around 8-10 years. But the kit is all cast iron and wont wear out. Basically it stacks the two barrells horizontally and has feet, braces to stack the barrels , a door and hinges and a pipe to connect the two barrels.

The lower barrel is the burn chamber and the second barrel basically just captures the exhaust heat before it goes out the chimney. So you have the outside surface of two 55 gal drums throwing out heat.

Basically the kit is a little over a $100 I believe , the chimney will run around $100 for 1 story and you can buy used 4 metal barrels for a $100. So you have a $300 investment into a safe wood burning system.But it would need to sit on a non combustible surface of at least 8'x8' to be safe. You can purchase 1/2'' thick cement board to put underneath it on a wood type floor for under $40 and if you wanted it to look nice tile over the cement board.

I would worry about fire saftey issues when building any wood burning system and the chimney is a very important part of this. Wood burning chimneys have a specific rating and when you pass through ceilings , walls and roofs you need a rated multiple layer system to prevent burning down your building as there will most likely be no Fire Dept to come to the rescue. If you dont vent it right and your ceiling , wall or roof start on fire most of the time there is significant damage even if a fire dept responds quickly!

I would think you could utilize an electric stove as a burning chamber for a few years maybe if you are creative , have extra metal to beef up the top and have extra firesafe seals to seal the door. This is assuming you have a safe chimney system
If you put fire clay, or fire bricks in the bottom of your fire chamber (make sure to bring them up at least 1/3 of the way up the side), the barrels will last practically forever.
Old 01-21-2011, 09:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtncharlie View Post
If you put fire clay, or fire bricks in the bottom of your fire chamber (make sure to bring them up at least 1/3 of the way up the side), the barrels will last practically forever.
I agree.

Fire clay is very easy to work with too.
Old 01-21-2011, 09:34 PM
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Looks pretty good there. I'd ditch the secondary air inlet to the upper drum. Even more so becuse of the water coil mod. That drum is not getting hot enough to initiate any secondary combustion. Maybe a little bit when the stove is really cooking.

you're loosing efficieny and cooling off your stack with that. The cooler the stack runs, the more creosote and soot it is accumulating.
Old 01-21-2011, 09:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ForestBeekeeper View Post
Does that answer your question?
Sure did. Thanks.
Old 01-21-2011, 09:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailinghudson25 View Post
Looks pretty good there. I'd ditch the secondary air inlet to the upper drum. Even more so becuse of the water coil mod. That drum is not getting hot enough to initiate any secondary combustion. Maybe a little bit when the stove is really cooking.

you're loosing efficieny and cooling off your stack with that. The cooler the stack runs, the more creosote and soot it is accumulating.
No creosote worries here.

Steal roof.

I want to suck as much heat from every pound of fuel as I can
Old 01-21-2011, 09:49 PM
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I personally like the efficiency of a Rocket Mass Heater, though that double-barrel stove looks really nice! I wonder if the two could be merged... **wheels turning**
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