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Old 04-22-2008, 12:53 AM
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Default Foods that need No Refrigeration and No Cooking



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I'm coming up with a list of foods that don't require refrigeration or cooking that can be stored for long periods of time and can be rotated out.

This is a list that I've come up with so far:

Canned Foods (limited to individual serving sizes or eating the entire contents of a larger can in one meal)
Canned Baked Beans
Canned Bean Dip
Canned Bread
Canned Fish: Oysters, Salmon, Sardines, Tuna, Tuna Salad etc.,
Canned Fruit
Canned Meats: Beef, Chicken, Chicken Salad, Deviled Ham, Spam, Turkey Spam, Vienna Sausages, etc.
Canned Milk (Dairy)
Canned Pastas
Canned Pie Fillings
Canned Soups
Gelatin Cups: Jello
Pudding Cups (Dairy)

Dry Foods
Cheese and Cracker Packs (Dairy)
Cheese and Peanut Butter Packs
Crackers
Dried Fruits (no utensils needed): Dried Apples, Dried Apricots, Dried Bananas, Dried Cranberries, Dried Dates, Dried Figs, Dried Kiwi, Dried Mangoes, Dried Peaches, Dried Persimmons, Dried Pineapples, Dried Strawberries, Prunes, Raisins, Wolf Berries (Goji Berries)
Dried Vegetables
Dry Breakfast Cereals: Can be eaten with or without milk
Energy Bars (no utensils needed)
Fruit Leather (no utensils needed)
Granola Bars (no utensils needed)
Jerky (no utensils needed)
Nuts (Raw or Roasted): Almonds, Brazil Nuts, Cashews, Coconut, Hazel Nuts, Macadamia Nuts, Peanuts, Pistachio Nuts, Walnuts,
Parched Corn
Pemmican
Seeds: Chia Seeds, Pumpkin Seeds, Sunflower Seeds,
Pork Rinds (no utensils needed)
Trail Mix (no utensils needed)
Vitamin and Mineral Supplements (no utensils needed)

Condiments
Almond Butter
Almond Paste
Bacon Bits
Cheese (Dairy): Velveeta in a jar
Condiment Packets (FREE: from restaurants. no utensils needed): Barbecue Sauce, Creamy Italian Dressing, Duck Sauce, French Dressing, Honey, Jam, Jelly, Ketchup, Mayonnaise, Mustard, Relish, Salsa, Soy Sauce, Tabasco Sauce, Taco Sauce, Worcester Sauce, etc.
Hazelnut Spread: Nutella
Honey
Marzipan
Oils: Olive, Sunflower
Peanut Butter
Spices
Spray Cheese (Dairy. no utensils needed): Easy Cheese

Drinks
Beer (Bottles or Cans. Cans and bottles with twist off caps need no utensils)
Cider
Drink Powders
Flavored Milk Boxes (Dairy)
Fruit Juice (Boxes, Cans, Packs. Individual serving sizes need no utensils)
Liquor
Vegetable Juice
Water (FREE: Filtered Tap Water)
Wine: In a box

Junk Foods (not something I usually eat, but it does apply)
Candies (no utensils needed)
Chips (no utensils needed)
Cookies (no utensils needed)
Gum (no utensils needed): Researching Lotte Black Black caffeinated gum
Pastries (no utensils needed)
Toaster Pastries (no utensils needed): Pop Tarts

Can you add to the list?

Thanks

Last edited by Enter_Narne; 04-24-2008 at 08:47 PM..
Old 04-22-2008, 10:19 AM
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My next goal will be to store foods in 6 gallon paint buckets. Each bucket will have enough food to feed one person for a month at 3000 calories a day.

This may be a tall order (literally) since I want to rely mostly on canned foods.
Old 04-22-2008, 10:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Enter_Narne View Post
My next goal will be to store foods in 6 gallon paint buckets. Each bucket will have enough food to feed one person for a month at 3000 calories a day.

This may be a tall order (literally) since I want to rely mostly on canned foods.
This is going to require a lot of rotation on your part. If the bucket is sealed, you will have to open it, inspect the contents, date everything - this can be a pretty big task.
Old 04-22-2008, 10:31 AM
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This is going to require a lot of rotation on your part. If the bucket is sealed, you will have to open it, inspect the contents, date everything - this can be a pretty big task.
You're right.

I don't plan to have all those foods I've listed in my pantry. That is just a list of foods that I can pick from.

I suppose I'll have all the foods that are not canned in non-sealed buckets. Since this food storage system will be on a month long rotation the buckets do not have to be sealed. So if a disaster strikes I'll have at least a month's worth of food available. Having the system in buckets will prevent pests, air, etc. from getting the food in the month it is in the food storage system.

The junk foods will be in sealed buckets. I would rather have to work to get at the junk foods. It would make it less tempting to splurge.

The canned foods can stay out on open shelves so they can be rotated easily since they are in easy view.

This food rotation system will be in addition to a deep storage food cache.
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Old 04-22-2008, 06:48 PM
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I have some cylindrical paint buckets with a circular footprint. I was wondering if anyone has any comments on plastic buckets with a square footprint. You know, the kind that kitty litter comes in. I figure the buckets with square footprints would take up less room since they can be placed side by side and use up less floorspace.
Old 04-22-2008, 07:09 PM
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You forgot my favorite dried fruit. Dates.

Also, it has been my experience that eating dried vegetables without at least soaking them is not a treat.

If you are going to use mostly canned goods, a normal water supply should be adequate. If you do a lot of dried things, you will need extra water, whether or not you soak them. They will draw water from the stomach if you don't drink enough.

Velvetta cheese, pemmican, parched corn (definitely need extra water), almond paste, marzipan, canned pie fillings, Parmalat shelf stable liquid milk or canned milk.
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Old 04-22-2008, 07:17 PM
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Wow thanks for the food suggestions. I totally forgot about pemmican. Jeez! And I call myself a prepper? I'm going to edit the original post to reflect your suggestions.
Old 04-22-2008, 07:21 PM
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Make SURE you do not store food in buckets that are not food grade buckets as some plastic absorbs what was first in it and such can leak into food. Even using sealed mylar bags the buckets need to be food grade. You will also need oxygen absorbers.
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Old 04-22-2008, 07:39 PM
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Hey Jerry, I have a question about all the foods you listed. Once you open the packaging on those foods do they have to be refrigerated? I'm going to add more information to the list about which foods can be closed back up after opening and stored without refrigeration. One example of this is peanut butter. You can store the jar on a shelf at room temperature, open it up, scoop out some, close it back up and store it back on the shelf for a long time.
Old 04-22-2008, 08:24 PM
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The milk would need to be refrigerated after opening. I use the quart size, but there are smaller sizes. You would want to use it within a day or two, so the smaller the package the better if it's just you.

Same with the Velvetta. It would last a few days w/o refrigeration, but keeps better if kept cool. I use the small package.

Almost all of the can goods, if not eaten within one day would need to be refrigerated. Those put up in brine, vinegar, or heavily sweetened last much longer.

I use a 'safety' can opener that lifts the lid off the can in a manner that allows it to be placed back on the can. You would still want to use them within a day or two. Less if they are just out in the open where airborne germs can get to them. Even if not refrigerated, keep open cans in a closed container and check them carefully before consuming any of the contents after they have set for very long. Much better to kill a can off at once than risk illness from storing opened cans w/o refrigeration. Even a cooling box can extend the safety margin.

This is what I do and I haven't been sick. But there is a real risk in keeping packaged foods for very long after opening. Use your own judgement.
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Old 04-22-2008, 11:48 PM
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Good stuff Jerry, Thanks again
Old 04-23-2008, 06:35 AM
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Cracked Wheat, Mac Noodles, Rice, Spices, Powdered Milk, Powdered Cheese.

I have the 4 and 6 gal buckets with Gama lids. Gama lids screw on and off and have a rubber seal.

40lbs of rice in a 6 gal bucket. 40 lbs of cracked wheat in 6 gal bucket. I put some Bay leaves in the buckets and seal them tight and I have food for TDW(The Dear Wife) and I for 40 days in each bucket. Beans in the 4 gal buckets. Powdered Milk in the 6 gal buckets.

Doing a grab and run bucket? Try soup packets, bullion and oatmeal packets. Tea and a thing of honey. Taking a pound of sugar might help. I have ER bars. 800 calories and all your vitamins and minerals per day in a 3 day bar. Not bad tasting either. 4 bars is enough to keep an active person going for a week.

Pemmican is not a good idea if you are talking summer. The fats go bad quickly in the summer heat. And I do not think Beer is a good idea either. Who wants a drunk or impaired lush making decisions in a survival situation? (Stop preaching, damn it!)

You have a good idea on the foods. Store what you normally eat. Change in diet takes some getting used too. If you are doing mostly canned good get a little red wagon and use that to move your goods by foot. Save your back.

Don

I have to add something you might have forgotten: TP!!! Just tell Your Dear Wife she has to use a pine cone and your life will not be worth living for some time!

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Old 04-23-2008, 07:10 AM
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What about vitamins/mineral supplements?
When eating strictly canned and long-term shelved food for an extended period of time, are we getting all that our bodies need?
What is lost during processing canned foods?
What is lost during long-term storage of dry foods?

Wine, to supply iron for the women and comfort for everyone.
boxed wine takes less space and with today's packing technology, it lasts longer when opened (less air gets in), and unless you are a wine fanatic, you can't really tell the difference with bottled wine.

Was canned veggetables added?
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Old 04-23-2008, 08:54 AM
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dilligaf2u2, Thanks for the tip about Pemmican in summer time.

miklosb, Thanks for the tips on vitamins/mineral supplements and wine in a box. Canned vegetables weren't added because they need to be cooked. That doesn't mean I'm not stocking them, I'm just not adding them to this particular list.
Old 04-23-2008, 09:15 AM
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Consider using smaller buckets. 6 gallon buckets are pretty big. 2 gallon or 3 gallon pails give you a little more flexibility in cracking one open without potentially spoiling the rest of the contents before it's exhausted.
Old 04-23-2008, 09:30 AM
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There are a lot of morning cereals: raisin bran, granola, muselix(sp?), cherios, etc. that of course don't need refrigeration. I realize many are mostly sugar with some vitamins throw in, but there are some hearty healthy ones as well.

Of course adding a little of Jerry's canned milk or even making some powder milk (if you can drink that stuff) would be easy.
Old 04-23-2008, 10:03 AM
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yonder, good point on smaller buckets.

Micah, I'm adding dry cereals to the list.
Old 04-23-2008, 10:06 AM
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I suppose MRE's and Mountain House freeze dried foods could be added to this list. Do the Mountain House foods need to be cooked though?
Old 04-23-2008, 10:16 AM
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Quote:
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I suppose MRE's and Mountain House freeze dried foods could be added to this list. Do the Mountain House foods need to be cooked though?
Most of them don't need to be cooked, just rehydrated. There are a few exceptions so check the package. Many of them suggest rehydrating with boiling water, but that's just to get the serving temperature up so you have a hot meal. In a pinch you can rehydrate most of them with ambient temperature water and they will rehydrate just fine and be perfectly edible.
Old 04-24-2008, 07:24 PM
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So I tried some Chef Boyardee ravioli in a can without cooking it. It was pretty good. After I ate it I asked myself why would I warm up any food that can be eaten at room temperature. I came up with four reasons.

1. To kill any germs. I'm pretty confident that there is nothing to worry about with eating canned foods without cooking them. Germs are usually killed in the canning process. If there are germs in the can there are signs that will alert me to their presence.

2. To warm the body with warm food. If I'm not cold then I don't see the need to warm up food that doesn't require it. As a matter of fact, if I am hot then I really don't want warm food at all.

3. To make the food more tender to eat. If the food is just a little tougher to eat then I don't have a problem with chewing it a little longer. Of course if it is too tough then I guess it will have to get warmed up.

4. Moral. If moral is an issue and a warm can of soup will cheer a person up then let them have warm soup.
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