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Old 05-23-2010, 05:59 PM
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J.McDonald Knives J.McDonald Knives is offline
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Default Survival Walking Stick



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Survival Walking Stick Parts List:

1. 1.5"x58-60" Solid Wood Pole or Unfinished Walking Stick (I bought a 5' length of 1.5" Pine Rod from Home Depot, sold by the foot)
2. 2-3 D-cell Maglight (preferably used and then send to a local repair center to get the O-rings replaced)
3. 20mm Diameter Compass
4. Thermometer
5. Paracord
6. 1 1/8" (28mm) Alpine Spike (also known as Metal Spike Ferrule)
7. Alpine Spike Rubber Tip
8. Zinc Coupler for Walking Cane
9. 1.25" Round Flat Mirror
10. Devcon 2 Ton Epoxy (30minute)
11. Survival Kit (fishing line, hooks, weights, bandaids, strike anywhere matches, kindling, magnesium stick, striker, etc)
12. 1.25"x10" Section of Bamboo with 1 Joint in it
13. Peel and stick ruler for fishing rod

Tools Required:

1. Hand Saw
2. Hammer
3. Drill Press or Hand Drill
4. Vise
5. Tape Measure
6. Drill Bits (1/4, 3/16, 5/16 long shank, 7/16, 3/4)
7. Sandpaper (50 grit and 320 grit)
8. Wood Varnish
9. Black Matte or Olive Drab Matte Spray Paint (optional)

Accessories for Walking Stick:

1. Fish Spear (1/4"x8" 303 Stainless Steel Rod, Spearfishing Spear Tip with 2 blades, 1/4-20 and 6mm x 0.75 Dies)
2. Snake Hook (1/4"x12" Steel Rod, 1/4-20 Die)
3. Drag/Grabbing Hook (1/4"x2" Eye Bolt)

Walking Stick Assembly:

1. Take your Maglight and remove the battery cap and rubber switch button cap. Take an allen wrench just small enough to fit inside the hole in the switch and you will find a screw at the bottom of it, unscrew it, depress the button, and slide the whole switch assemply out through the bottom of the flash light. It may require you to unscrew the head of the flash light and use a rod to push the assembly out. Next take your flash light body and cut it off right below the button. This is going to be your water proof container for your survival kit. Take off the battery cap and remove the spring and spare bulb. You should see a small circle in the exact center of the cap on the inside. Take your center punch and make a mark in the middle of that circle. Take a 3/16" drill bit and drill a hole in the cap, then take a 3/4" drill bit and drill out that hole again. I actually used a 3/4" paddle bit in my drill press and did it slowly but only use that as a last resort.

2. Measure 1.25"-1.5" down from the top of your stick and tape it off, this is to mark where you are going to epoxy on your container. Begin sanding it down evenly with the 50 grit sand paper until the container fits snugly over it. Next take a 5/16" long shank drill bit and drill a hole lengthwise 7" into the stick, making sure to pull it out every few inches to clean off the bit so that you don't create too much friction and catch your stick on fire (only do this if you plan to make the fish spear.)

3. Measure down 1"-2" from where the bottom of the container will be and make a mark, then measure down about 6"-7" below that and make another mark, if you want your grip to be longer then measure a bit more and make your mark there. This is to show where you will wrap the paracord for your handle grip. If you want you can take your 50 grit sandpaper and sand it down a little between the 2 marks to make a little shelf to keep your paracord grip from slipping down later on. If you are a shorter person you can cut the pole length down until the position is comfortable for you. Measure down about 2 inches below the bottom of the grip and make a mark. Take your 3/4" drill bit and drill a hole just deep enough to sink the thermometer flush on all sides.

4. From the bottom of your stick measure up about 4" and make a mark. Next cut that 4" section off. Take a 7/16" drill bit and drill a 1" deep hole into the center of your stick on the bottom and on one end of the 4" section you cut off. Next taper the other end of the 4" section until the Alpine Spike fits snugly over it.

5. Take your 320 grit sandpaper and sand down all the wood pieces until they are smooth with no splinters. Next take your varnish and varnish all the pieces of wood. While that is drying you can sand down your container to remove all the texturing and also sand down where you cut it off and taper it so that you have a smooth transition between it and the walking stick, then spray paint it. After the varnish dries you can apply another coat of varnish if you want.

6. Once all coats of the varnish are completely cured you can begin to assemble all the parts. Take your container and measure 3/4" from where you cut it and drill 3 holes equally spaced out around the container to place small nails or screws, make sure the holes are just big enough to put the screws or nails through. Remove the cap from your container. Measure out a small amount of epoxy and mix it up thoroughly, then spread it around the sanded area that the container fits over. You may want to take the 50 grit sandpaper and rough up the inside of the container and the section on the walking stick to give it a firmer grip. Another trick is to take a 1/4" drill bit and drill a few holes about 1/4" deep to make some pockets for the epoxy, this is optional of course. After you apply the epoxy, slip the container back over the walking stick with a slight twisting action and hold it firmly in place for a few minutes. Take your mixing stick from the epoxy and use it to spread the epoxy around the joint and to remove any excess epoxy. Give the epoxy another few minutes to set up before hammering in your nails or screws. Be sure the nails or screws you use are not longer than 1/2" or they will protrude into the hole for the fish spear and you will not be able to put the spear into the hole. Set it some place where it won't get knocked around or fall to allow the epoxy to finish setting up. This should take a few hours to set up.

7. While the epoxy is finishing setting up, take the 4" section and apply some epoxy to it and attach the Alpine Spike. Once again you can rough up the area where it will be epoxied to and the inside of the cone with the 50 grit sandpaper. After you place them together press them together firmly and hold it for a few minutes, then take your mixing stick and remove any excess epoxy and smooth out the epoxy around the joint. Let it set up for a few more minutes and then hammer in the supplied nails. If they protrude into the 7/16" hole you drilled then you can use a file after it cures to trim them down. Set that some place to allow the epoxy to finish setting up. This should take a few hours to set up. If you want to get rid of the shiney finish you can rough up the hole surface and spray paint it.

8. After the epoxy sets up for a few hours on both pieces take the coupler apart and set the screw to the side, make sure not to lose it. Mix up a little more epoxy and place some in the 5/16" holes on the stick and the 4" section, then apply some epoxy onto the outside of the couplers. Place each one in the hole and tap them into it with a hammer, make sure they are flush with the wood. Wipe off the excess epoxy and place those to the side to allow them to set up.

9. Take the cap from the container and make sure the compass fits snuggly into the hole. Mix up a small bit of epoxy and apply it to the outside edge of the compass and to the inside of the hole, then place the compass in the hole and make sure the compass sits flush into the cap. Allow it to set up for about 5 minutes and check it to make sure it hasn't moved. Mix up some more epoxy and apply it to the inside of the cap until the the whole backside of the compass is covered and its nice and flat. Allow that about 5 hours to set up and firm up. Cut a piece of 1" dowel about 3/8"-1/2" long which is just long enough for the dowel to be flush with the inner lip on the cap, then mix up some more epoxy and place it on the inside of the cap on top of the other epoxy and place the dowel into the hole with a slight twisting action. Next apply some more epoxy to the dowel and a little to the inner lip of the cap and place the mirror into the cap and gently press down and twist it. Place it somewhere safe and allow it to fully cure. You can use the mirror as a signal mirror.

10. Now grab the stick and mix up a little bit of epoxy and apply it to the inside of the hole for the thermometer and to the bottom and edge of the thermometer, then firmly place the thermometer into the hole and position it until its sitting the right way. Wipe off the excess epoxy and allow it about an hour to set up. After that you can then wrap your handle with the paracord. You can also start from the bottom so that you can take the excess and make a wrist strap at the top. After you are done set that to the side and allow the epoxy to cure. Here is a link on different ways of making a grip with paracord. http://paracord-projects.blogspot.com/

11. Take the foot section and insert the screw into the coupling. You can apply some red locktite onto that section of the screw before screwing it all the way down. Now you can screw the foot onto the bottom of your walking stick. If you have any gaps you can sand down where you need to so that you can make it flush or find a 1.5" collar and epoxy it half way to the foot section so that it will hide the gap. If you choose to do that I would suggest roughing up the finish and spray painting it so that it isn't so shiny.

12. Now take a tape measure and measure from the bottom of the rubber foot up to the top of the taper. Take your fishing rod ruler and starting with the beginning of the ruler cut off at the same measurement and throw that section out, then peel off the backing and apply the rest of your ruler lengthwise starting at the taper and make sure not to stretch it or your measurements will be off. If you wish to start the ruler from the top of the cone on the spike you can do that, just make sure to measure to there and cut your ruler with the new measurement. Double check your measurement with your tape measure to make sure you didn't stretch the fishing rod ruler.

13. (This step is only if you are using the fish spear, if not you can skip this step) Now take the bamboo and make sure it fits snug into the container. If it doesn't fit be sure and sand it down until it does fit. Place the fish spear into the hole and then measure from the bottom of the container to the top of the fish spear to see how far it sticks up out of the hole and then add 1/4". Use that measurement to measure from the joint of the bamboo piece and make a mark, then cut it right there. Next part is where it gets tricky. Measure from the bottom of the container on the inside to the bottom of the threads and then subtract 1/2", then use that measurement to make a mark on the other end of the bamboo measuring from your last cut, then cut off that section. You can make a cap from a piece of foam or if you are crafty enough you can make one from a 1.25" wooden dowel and make it fit tight into bamboo and still have an overlapping cap. The capped section is where you place your survival kit. Now you can slide it into the container and screw down the cap. If the cap doesn't screw down all the way you can sand down the bamboo or the cap on the bamboo until you get the cap to screw down but you don't want to have it fit really tight or you risk the epoxy separating from the container and allow water and moisture to leak into the container. I suggest making it fit snug and then sanding it down just a little more to where it rattles slightly. And now you are done and have a survival walking stick!!


Assembly for Accessories:

Fish Spear: Clamp the 303 stainless steel rod into a good vise. Measure down 1" from each end and make a mark, this is where your threads are going to stop. On one end thread the rod with the 1/4-20 die and on the other end thread it with the 6mm x 0.75 die, stopping when you get to the 1" mark. Make sure to use some cutting fluid to keep it from seizing up and making the cuts smoother and also backing it all the way off about every 1/4" to clean out the die. Now take your spearfishing spear tip and screw it onto the 6mm x 0.75 end and you can apply some red locktite to this as well if you prefer since you will most likely be grabbing it to unscrew it from your walking stick. Now you are ready to screw it into the end of your walking stick.

Snake Hook: Clamp 2" of the 1/4"x12" rod into the vise. Now grab it and bend it 90 degrees. Next, measure 4" from the bend and make a mark, this is where the center of the U-shaped bend of your hook will be. Unclamp it from the vise and clamp in a 4" diameter pipe. Place your center mark at the top of the pipe and bend your U-shape into the hook. Now unclamp the pipe and place your hook back into the vise so that you can thread the end of it. Measure down 1" and make a mark, this is where your threads are going to stop. Now start threading the end with the 1/4-20 die until it reaches the 1" mark, making sure to completely back it all the way off every 1/4" to clean out the die. Be sure and use cutting fluid to keep it from seizing up and making the cuts smoother. If you wish you can grind down the end of the hook at about a 30 degree angle to allow it to slip under the snake easier. And now you have a snake hook that you can screw into the end of your walking stick. I do not encourage handling any snake unless you know what you are doing and know exactly what snake species you are dealing with and know if it's poisonous or not. If you know what you are doing you can use your snake hook to pick up a snake and also to pin down the head of the snake in order to pick it up with your hands or to cut off its head so that you can clean it and eat it.

Drag/Grabbing Hook: Clamp the 1/4"x2" eyelet into the vise. Find where the end of the eyelet is and make a mark about 1/2" from the end and cut it off right there. Now you have a hook that you can use to drag something, hook onto something you can't reach like when you are running rope over a branch that is too tall to reach by yourself or a branch for a snare or grabbing something out of the river so that you don't have to get your shoes and socks wet.


Links for the Parts that I used:

http://www.texasknife.com/vcom/produ...oducts_id=2495
http://www.texasknife.com/vcom/produ...oducts_id=2637
http://www.texasknife.com/vcom/produ...oducts_id=2479
http://www.texasknife.com/vcom/produ...oducts_id=1818
http://www.irishwalkingsticks.com/in...ermometer.aspx
http://www.irishwalkingsticks.com/me...keferrule.aspx
http://www.handyrule.com/products.html (Last item on this page, item # 94901)

Unfinished Walking Sticks:

http://www.treelineusa.com/walking-s...walking-sticks
http://www.sticksite.com/
http://www.irishwalkingsticks.com/walkingsticks.aspx
http://www.osagestaves.com/_wsn/page3.html

Will post pics later. I haven't finished mine yet but will have pics to go with each step.
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Old 05-23-2010, 06:57 PM
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J.McDonald Knives J.McDonald Knives is offline
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Few quick notes:

The spike foot is good for traction on ice and places where the rubber foot could slip, and its also good as a self defense item in case you are being attacked or charged at by an animal or a person and be able to keep a safe distance.

The ruler is not only useful for measuring fish and other things but also to find out the depth of the water or other things that you may be walking through as well as see how deep you could sink in soft mud.

The mirror in the cap of the container is there as a signal mirror that you can keep close at hand instead of trying to search for your other one in your BOB.

I wouldn't recommend using the container as a club for fending off things, the spike is better suited for that purpose.

If you are crafty enough you can come up with other useful accessories for the walking stick that you can screw in to the 1/4-20 cane join. One item I thought about and it wouldn't be that hard either is get one of the Cold Steel Bushman knives with the hollow handle and make a handle out of wood for it, epoxy it together and have some sticking out of the end and then add another cane join with the threads for it and you could have a hunting spear. For a cap to protect the threads you can cut another 2" section of the same handle material and insert the other cane join in it. This allows you to also use it as a machete or knife. I can make a kydex sheath for it, you just order the kydex sheath kit and have it shipped to my house and ship the knife to me with a money order or cash to pay for the shipping and I'll ship it all back to you with a completed sheath. If you want a thigh sheath for it you will have to send me the required length of 1" nylon webbing and a pair of strap adjusters.

If you have any questions or get a little confused let me know or just wait for pics that will follow each step including the accessories.
Old 05-23-2010, 08:52 PM
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vegasrandall vegasrandall is offline
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I like the waxwood sticks from the local martial arts place.the wood is incredibly flexible and strong.I ordered a threaded insert 1/4by20 for a pocket transit or camera mount.
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Old 05-23-2010, 09:33 PM
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J.McDonald Knives J.McDonald Knives is offline
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Originally Posted by vegasrandall View Post
I like the waxwood sticks from the local martial arts place.the wood is incredibly flexible and strong.I ordered a threaded insert 1/4by20 for a pocket transit or camera mount.
Thats the same insert thats on my Survival Walking Stick.
Old 05-23-2010, 09:58 PM
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Arrow PINE?

Pine for a walking/survival stick. That won't last!

I use a hardwood broom/mop handle.

Left is a broom handle.
It has a rubber tip.
A bicycle grip on top with a strap.

Next is a mop handle.
It has a carriage bolt in the mop attachemt ferrule.
A billiard ball was screwed & glued to the top.
The handle was grooved and wrapped with cord.
You can undo the cord to use for whatever; it is about 15 feet of 1/8 cord.
This is a very durable stick and has been on the Appalachian Trail in the Great Smoky Mountain National Park.

The two on the right are something my Dad made out of some kind of tree; they have been varnished or whatever, probably a urethane.

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Old 05-23-2010, 10:19 PM
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J.McDonald Knives J.McDonald Knives is offline
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Any normal wood will last if treated properly. Thats why I said to varnish it. And broom handles are made from pine.
Old 05-26-2010, 09:11 PM
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I would love to see some of the ideas yall come up with for accessories and carvings yall do to your Survival Walking Stick.
Old 05-26-2010, 09:41 PM
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Jeffrey Jeffrey is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J.McDonald Knives View Post
Any normal wood will last if treated properly. Thats why I said to varnish it. And broom handles are made from pine.
I'd use Boiled Linseed oil or Tung oil. Keep the moisture out, and the warp stays away.
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Old 05-27-2010, 11:04 AM
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Looking forward to the pictures tbh Sounds good
Old 05-28-2010, 04:42 AM
Mathias Mathias is offline
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I have an unfinished basswood walking stick that I may do some of this to. Good ideas!


-John
Old 05-28-2010, 05:21 AM
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J.McDonald Knives J.McDonald Knives is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathias View Post
I have an unfinished basswood walking stick that I may do some of this to. Good ideas!


-John
Can't wait to see pics of what you do to it. While I'm waiting on supplies for mine I'm working on a hand made spear to use with mine.
Old 05-29-2010, 12:23 AM
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nice write up. pretty good idea, gave me all kinds of great ideas
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Old 05-29-2010, 12:35 AM
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nice write up. pretty good idea, gave me all kinds of great ideas
Glad to hear it. Its always great when my creativity makes other peoples creativity come out as well. Can't wait to see what you come up with.
Old 05-29-2010, 02:23 AM
sojurn87 sojurn87 is offline
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On the survival stick....

When I'm in the woods I just pick one up.

To go through all that effort and end up losing it or breaking it, would p!ss me off something fierce.

Good on you if you can hang on to it.

One other thing to consider...

I don't like to carry all of my eggs in one basket. That is to say, if I ever lose any one particular thing, as much as it would suck, I can still get along without it.

If I dump my small fishing kit, my ability to make fire (without rubbing 2 sticks), compass or signal mirror didn't go with it.

The K.I.S.S. principle applies.

Just a thought.
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Old 05-29-2010, 07:18 AM
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sounds like a very interesting project. cant wait see pics. I'm gonna make one of my own and i'll post pics when i am through.
Old 05-29-2010, 01:46 PM
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sounds like a very interesting project. cant wait see pics. I'm gonna make one of my own and i'll post pics when i am through.
I can't wait to see them.
Old 05-29-2010, 02:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeffrey View Post
I'd use Boiled Linseed oil or Tung oil. Keep the moisture out, and the warp stays away.
The linseed oil won't keep moisture out of wood (learned that in gunsmithing school) but tung oil will, as well as most gun stock finishes and poly finishes. I love tung oil and use it on most of my gunstocks and musical instrument projects.
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Old 05-31-2010, 09:42 AM
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Great ideas, can't wait to see pics
Old 06-01-2010, 05:05 AM
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Man no pics yet...lol! I have several sticks, I kinda make em as a hobby. I can't wait to see the pics, I am very interested in this, as well as some of my buddys.
Old 06-06-2010, 04:18 AM
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You're kidding right?
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