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Old 04-16-2008, 01:43 PM
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Default Fruit trees south Ms.???



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Hi all!! I was wondering , I live in south Ms. and would like to plant some fruit tree on my land. For the climate down here what would be the best type to plant and also doesnt need alot of upkeep. I work offshore and my dear wife doesnt have the greenest thumb around here!!
Old 04-16-2008, 01:51 PM
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Peach trees, pecan trees, plum trees, pear trees and fig trees are a southern favorite.

As for easy to grow - Fig trees. You can cut them down and run the stump over with a lawn mower and they will sprout back up the next year. Figs can be used to make jelly and preserves or just eat them raw.

Pear tress - certain types are heavy producers and are very hardly.

Peach trees - The tops can grow to 25 feet across and can be heavy producers. Georgia is one of the largest peach producers in the whole nation. Peaches have to be preserved or frozen as they spoil soon after harvest.

Pecan trees - these things take a long time to grow, but are well worth it. Pecans can be stored for months if kept dry. Consider the pecan tree a friend to the survivalist. Pecans are harvested in October, and can be stored through the winter. It was common for the old timers to plant a dozen+ pecan trees on their property. That way the family had plenty of snacks for the winter. I have seen people harvest @15 gallons of pecans from a single pecan tree. So just a few pecan trees can provide enough pecans for a family to last a whole winter.
Old 04-17-2008, 11:51 AM
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Thanks Kev. I already have 6 pecans, 1 fig, and 4 "cooking pear" trees(not sure what that really is). Lady we bought the house from 6 yrs ago planted them and doing ok. Just wanted to get some other options. Again, thanks!!
Old 04-17-2008, 01:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernComfort View Post
Hi all!! I was wondering , I live in south Ms. and would like to plant some fruit tree on my land. For the climate down here what would be the best type to plant and also doesnt need alot of upkeep. I work offshore and my dear wife doesnt have the greenest thumb around here!!
You should be asking your county agricultural extension agent. Not only can they tell you the exact cultivars you are most likely to have success with, but they can also handle your soil testing to tell you what amendments you'll need to make for optimum success. You already paid for it, so why not ask?
Old 04-18-2008, 12:24 AM
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Here are some good unique tasty fruit trees you can grow in zone 8a;

Mulberry tree (like a blackberry but better, drought tolerant)

Russian Pomegranate (high tolerance to cold pomegrante, drought tolerant)

Plouts (Plums mixed with apricots or nectarines)

Loquats (drought tolerant)

And of course the common favorite fruit trees;

Peach
Plum
Apple
Cherry
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Old 05-03-2008, 02:31 AM
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I would contact your ag center extension agent. Here is an excellent publication from the LSU Ag Center. Latitudes in La. can be compared with yours down in S. Mississippi.

http://www.lsuagcenter.com/en/lawn_g...me+Orchard.htm
Old 05-03-2008, 02:33 AM
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Default Persimmon

Persimmon is a great one almost always forgotten!
Old 05-03-2008, 03:09 AM
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Deer, raccoons and other animals simply love persimmons. Here is one no one mentioned, Southern Comfort....BLUE BERRIES...I have 6 rows that run the length of my 6 acres...5 different varieties...some as small as your pinkie nail, some as large or larger depending on rain, than your thumb! of course I have the pecans, apple, pears and peach trees too...not to mention alot of wild blackberries..LOL
Old 05-03-2008, 11:58 AM
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Pomegranates are fantastic. I had forgotten about them. I had a relative who had one in his yard. We loved visiting when I was a kid just so we could get one.

Very rich in antioxydants.
Old 06-12-2008, 08:30 PM
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trying to grow south carolina cherries
Old 06-12-2008, 08:31 PM
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Would like to get some info on growing cherries in south carolina
Old 06-13-2008, 03:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dayliterun View Post
Deer, raccoons and other animals simply love persimmons. Here is one no one mentioned, Southern Comfort....BLUE BERRIES...I have 6 rows that run the length of my 6 acres...5 different varieties...some as small as your pinkie nail, some as large or larger depending on rain, than your thumb! of course I have the pecans, apple, pears and peach trees too...not to mention alot of wild blackberries..LOL
Would love to see some pics of your 'garden of Eden' sounds like a wonderful forest garden

Cheers

Old 06-13-2008, 09:54 AM
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Quote:
Peach trees, pecan trees, plum trees, pear trees and fig trees are a southern favorite.

As for easy to grow - Fig trees. You can cut them down and run the stump over with a lawn mower and they will sprout back up the next year. Figs can be used to make jelly and preserves or just eat them raw.

Pear tress - certain types are heavy producers and are very hardly.

Peach trees - The tops can grow to 25 feet across and can be heavy producers. Georgia is one of the largest peach producers in the whole nation. Peaches have to be preserved or frozen as they spoil soon after harvest.

Pecan trees - these things take a long time to grow, but are well worth it. Pecans can be stored for months if kept dry. Consider the pecan tree a friend to the survivalist. Pecans are harvested in October, and can be stored through the winter. It was common for the old timers to plant a dozen+ pecan trees on their property. That way the family had plenty of snacks for the winter. I have seen people harvest @15 gallons of pecans from a single pecan tree. So just a few pecan trees can provide enough pecans for a family to last a whole winter.
+1

You might also want to look into blue berries, black berries, and strawberries.
Old 06-14-2008, 07:34 PM
stoneunhenged stoneunhenged is offline
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This will give you a good idea of what could be grown in your area (minus the citrus):

http://www.justfruitsandexotics.com/
Old 06-14-2008, 07:51 PM
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Figs and pears least resistance to pests and disease, and you can do more with these 2 fruits than any other.
Old 11-29-2008, 09:35 PM
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Mayhaws. Growing mayhaw trees on the MS. coast. They are low maintenace and are great for jelly or wine making.
Old 11-30-2008, 10:28 AM
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I imagine you are zoned the same as where I am in Florida. If so, you should be able to grow citrus such as hamlin oranges, grapefruit and nearly anything else. That's another beauty of the south, you can grow dang near anything worth growing.
Old 11-30-2008, 11:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernComfort View Post
Hi all!! I was wondering , I live in south Ms. and would like to plant some fruit tree on my land. For the climate down here what would be the best type to plant and also doesnt need alot of upkeep. I work offshore and my dear wife doesnt have the greenest thumb around here!!
Hello,

I live in south central MS. My BOL has plums, persimmons, pears, apples, muscadines and pecans. Several of the previous posts gave good answers. Figs are almost impossible to kill. I have tried to get rid of them at several locations over the years, and it's always a chore. I have also had the same experience trying to eradicate muscadines for folks. They are very resilient. If you are not intending on spending alot of time on upkeep, put the trees near the woods. Deer love persimmons and apples. It's nice to have a side of venison with your fruit.
Old 11-30-2008, 02:06 PM
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Don't forget pawpaws and apples.

As was advised by others, pay attention to the different cultivars and make sure you get the type of fruit or nut that best suits your needs. For example, to me white peaches are tastier than the yellow varieties, but you have to be ready for immediate action when they get ripe or you'll miss the short window. Yellow peaches last a little longer.

The "cooking" pears you have are probably Keiffer. They will serve you well if you can them. I also have some of those but I'm going to plant a few of the softer, sweeter varieties for immediate consumption.

No one in my area (which is probably very close to yours) has had any luck with sweet cherries. They grow into nice trees but we don't have the chill hours to make the fruit set.

I'm about 60 miles from the gulf and citrus is marginal here. Most of the successful trees in my area have been the dwarf varieties. I believe this is because they can be protected from cold spells with cages wrapped in plastic whereas the largers trees are left exposed.

Be sure to look up the chill hour requirements for any apple trees you plant and check with your extension agent to see if they'll bear reliably in your area.

Most importantly, don't be afraid to experiment. If you have plenty of room and you want a fruit that is marginal in your area, throw it in the ground. You might be pleasantly surprised.

Good luck.
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