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Old 05-15-2010, 02:59 PM
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lonelake lonelake is offline
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Default Roselli Axe



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Other than cost, are there any downside to this axe? I am looking for experience in use, primarily splitting. My knife maker is recommending it Thanks in advance.

LL

http://www.roselli.fi/1/index-eng.html
Old 05-15-2010, 06:27 PM
SeekHer SeekHer is offline
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I have never used one of his axes but I have several of his knives and they are excellent.

The axe is commonly called the "bearded" axe and has quite common in Germany, Russia, Scandinavia, France and England for centuries.

I have a shaping axe and a carpenter's axe of similar design and they do their intended purposes with ease.

I would never hesitate to recommend Roselli to anyone looking for a very good knife.
Old 05-15-2010, 08:22 PM
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vicdotcom vicdotcom is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lonelake View Post
Other than cost, are there any downside to this axe? I am looking for experience in use, primarily splitting. My knife maker is recommending it Thanks in advance.

LL

http://www.roselli.fi/1/index-eng.html
I haven't tried it, but by looking at it, I can tell you that it is not the axe you are looking for if you are primarily using it for splitting. You need larger wedge on the head for that a poll for more weight behind the head would also help in splitting wood. Even on their website they describe the axe as "The Roselli Allround Axe does a proper job when it comes to cutting, hollow and carving wood."

This is a completely different purpose than splitting. All axes are not made for the same purposes. Looks likea great cutter though, but splitter... I think you can find a better axe for that intended purpose.

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Originally Posted by SeekHer View Post
I have a shaping axe and a carpenter's axe of similar design and they do their intended purposes with ease.

I would never hesitate to recommend Roselli to anyone looking for a very good knife.
I would love to try this as a carving/cutting axe. It looks like a joy to use and looks like it is naturally well balanced. But for splitting as Lonelake wanted.... I still think it may be better to go for a traditional splitting design.
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Old 05-17-2010, 08:18 PM
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ROCK6 ROCK6 is offline
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I do have the small Roselli hatchet and it does quite well at splitting...albeit smaller logs. It has a very profound convexed edge that excels at splitting smaller rounds. What is surprising is it does quite well at chopping...something I didn't think it would do so well at (compared to a convexed Snow & Nealley and Gransfors Bruks). It does have a smaller head (edge wise) and the poll, while able to be used as a hammer, is quite small. I will say it's a solidly built hatchet. If you're looking for a decent hatchet that can split and chop smaller rounds (6-8"), this would do the trick. It splits much better than my GB Wildlife hatchet...the smaller head really concentrates the impact and the wide, convex shape really pops the wood open. I prefer the GB hatchets/axes though as I feel I'm generally more accurate with chopping.

My go to pack axe is my GB SFA...it's must a more useful size/shape, but if I was planning on feeding a small pack stove and had a decent bucksaw, the Roselli would do well at splitting smaller logs quite quickly.

ROCK6
Old 05-17-2010, 08:34 PM
FarmerJohn FarmerJohn is offline
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His products look like very high quality but an i think a cheap 15-20 doller fiberglassed handled axe or a 10 doller hatchet will serve the same purpose with no noticable difference in performance
Id rather spend the money on one of his knives than one of those axes
Old 05-18-2010, 02:47 PM
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TrysteofFate TrysteofFate is offline
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His products look like very high quality but an i think a cheap 15-20 doller fiberglassed handled axe or a 10 doller hatchet will serve the same purpose with no noticable difference in performance
Id rather spend the money on one of his knives than one of those axes
Well, I have to disagree here. You CAN tell a difference between the high and low dollar hatchets once you get out in the woods, at least I can. I carry a GB myself and use it for just about everything that my knife doesn't do, and some things it would do.

That being said...I'm the grandson of a forester, and I've always had my hands on some high-quality axes, learned how to use them early. Most people probably couldn't feel it like I can.

It's like any tool, I suppose. As you get more proficient, the lesser quality tools seem progressively worse. Imagine say the trigger pull on a rifle. Early on, it doesn't matter much. You can't hit worth a flip anyway. But as you get better, experience a better trigger, you suddenly go back to your old rifles and feel that the triggers are just horrible, where you remember them being alright.

My .02.

Tryste.
Old 05-18-2010, 06:54 PM
FarmerJohn FarmerJohn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrysteofFate View Post
Well, I have to disagree here. You CAN tell a difference between the high and low dollar hatchets once you get out in the woods, at least I can. I carry a GB myself and use it for just about everything that my knife doesn't do, and some things it would do.

That being said...I'm the grandson of a forester, and I've always had my hands on some high-quality axes, learned how to use them early. Most people probably couldn't feel it like I can.

It's like any tool, I suppose. As you get more proficient, the lesser quality tools seem progressively worse. Imagine say the trigger pull on a rifle. Early on, it doesn't matter much. You can't hit worth a flip anyway. But as you get better, experience a better trigger, you suddenly go back to your old rifles and feel that the triggers are just horrible, where you remember them being alright.

My .02.

Tryste.
I am not trying to say that there the same just that they both will get the job done just one might take a few more swings or dul a little faster but I am a simple man one day i might get a expencive hatchet/axe but it would have to be functional and pleasing to my eye
maby something like this

Overall length of 480 mm, cutting edge length 85 mm, head mass 650 g, overall mass 1.1 kg. This stunning axe was hand forged from one piece of random pattern damascus by Kevin. The eye was punched and drifted. The handle is “Spoke” wood (speke hout) with a linseed oil finish. The wedge is of beech wood.
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