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Old 05-10-2010, 06:18 PM
Dr.prepper Dr.prepper is offline
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Default Cabin building forums?



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Cabin building is a hobbie of mine. I have built several small cabins for friends and family. I even bought a prefab lofted storage shed and turned it into a small guest house. That was a fun project and very inexpensive. I have some land in town that we dont use and I am actually thinking about buying some very inexpensive large storage sheds and converting them into small homes for low income families. I was just wondering if any members on here share the same interests or know of any good cabin building forums? Or any good prefab cabin shells, storage building forums, or cabin related forums? I have 3 good sites that I visit.

www.Countryplans.com
www.backwoodshome.com
www.small-cabin.com

Thanx
Old 05-10-2010, 06:32 PM
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This is something we are planning to do and thought that it would be more economical to build a couple three smaller buildings on an acreage as opposed to one big house. Two of these I knew about, but one I did not. Thanks for the post!!
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Old 05-10-2010, 06:38 PM
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This is something we are planning to do and thought that it would be more economical to build a couple three smaller buildings on an acreage as opposed to one big house. Two of these I knew about, but one I did not. Thanks for the post!!
I know of others in my area who did the very same thing. They built 4 small cabins 200 sq ft each right next to eachother in a square with a porch area in the center. No building permits needed and they now have over 1000sq ft of living area.
Old 05-10-2010, 06:54 PM
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Thats a good idea with the converted storage sheds. I had planned on doing something similar at my BOL after I built my home on it. I was going to put up 2 or 3 smaller cabins, about 300-400 square feet each with a little bathroom so family could have their own separate space but the main house will have the kitchen and be the meeting place. I have read that one could build a small cabin for about $1000 but I can't find any for under $15,000. I'll have to check out those forums and maybe get some ideas.
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Old 05-11-2010, 12:19 AM
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Thats a good idea with the converted storage sheds. I had planned on doing something similar at my BOL after I built my home on it. I was going to put up 2 or 3 smaller cabins, about 300-400 square feet each with a little bathroom so family could have their own separate space but the main house will have the kitchen and be the meeting place. I have read that one could build a small cabin for about $1000 but I can't find any for under $15,000. I'll have to check out those forums and maybe get some ideas.
On one of those forums they have an article with pictures of a cabin that was built all from scrap wood and salvaged materials. I cant remember the exact size but it was a nice little cabin and it cost less then $200 to build.

I built a 14 x 36 cabin, just over 500 sq ft of living space with 2 bedroom lofts with electricity and plumbing a kitchen and full bathroom for under $10,000.

I bought a storage shed and converted it into a guest house for $3,000. Im looking to do some more.

Those web sites are a great source of info for cabin building. And the members are all class acts just dieing to help eachother out.
Old 05-11-2010, 12:46 AM
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I know of others in my area who did the very same thing. They built 4 small cabins 200 sq ft each right next to eachother in a square with a porch area in the center. No building permits needed and they now have over 1000sq ft of living area.
We have several "city living" prepper friends who because of their career and family paths are just not able to move out to the country right now. Our ultimate goal is to have one small place for us (empty nesters) and two or three little houses the same size that we can use for storage for us, but if things go really awry our friends would have some place to come to. If it doesn't come to pass we are still where we want to be ... which is away ... far, far away ...

We have seen too many people who live in the country on big old acreages who think they are gonna have 15 to 20 people bug out at their place but they have no place to put 15 or 20 people. It amazes me just how short-sighted people who think they have it all figured out can be ...
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Old 05-11-2010, 12:55 AM
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There is a saw mill within 30 miles of me...They sell rough sawn pine...I have built several buildings and cabins with rough sawn lumber..All are patterned after 1870's style buildings....
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Old 05-11-2010, 01:00 AM
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Attached are 2 pics of the inside of my 170 sq.ft.cabin...
Attached Thumbnails
144.jpg   146.jpg  
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Old 05-11-2010, 01:03 AM
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Attached are 2 pics of the inside of my 170 sq.ft.cabin...
Great job. I love the rustic look. Is that concrete between the wood? I just put bead board on the interior of the cabins weve built.
Old 05-11-2010, 01:06 AM
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Great job. I love the rustic look. Is that concrete between the wood?
No concrete...It is LOG JAM chinking..Comes in the real big caulk tube and is flexible when it dries...I tried to make it look rustic like the 1870's..I gotta have my LazyBoy chair which is also my bed...
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Old 05-11-2010, 01:18 AM
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Attached are 2 pics of the inside of my 170 sq.ft.cabin...
That is sooo neat!!! So ... is your Lazy Boy really that comfortable?? I dunno ... I am thinking something more along the lines of 500 sq ft or so. I get a little claustrophobic sometimes!
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Old 05-11-2010, 01:41 AM
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I love this little cabin. If I was single I would live in something like this gladly. This little home cost This guy $15,000 to build. With my connections I could do It turn key for around $10,000. Ive seen this company called tiny homes who builds 200 sq ft homes and under and charge $50,000 - $70,000 for them. It amazes me how people will pay over $100,000 to have a small home built when with just a little research, training and help they can build their own for a fraction of that.

http://www.countryplans.com/nash.html
Old 05-11-2010, 02:14 AM
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That is sooo neat!!! So ... is your Lazy Boy really that comfortable?? I dunno ... I am thinking something more along the lines of 500 sq ft or so. I get a little claustrophobic sometimes!
Since my neck surgery years ago the Lazyboy is great...I don't sleep in that year round though....It took me 2 years to find the perfect ergonomic chair for me...500 ft is do able too..Whatever a person likes...IF you live in a wintery area a garage is a must and u can attch a garage at a later time......I ike my cabin small as it gets me outside to do things........
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Old 05-11-2010, 02:17 AM
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Smaller cabins are much easier to keep warm, and cool. Less expensive.
Old 05-11-2010, 02:18 AM
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That is a nice cabin that guy has.....My only suggestion to people is to insulate ALOT...When you think you have alot of insulation do even more.........
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Old 05-11-2010, 02:20 AM
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That is a nice cabin that guy has.....My only suggestion to people is to insulate ALOT...When you think you have alot of insulation do even more.........
Defenitley and vapor barrier.
Old 05-11-2010, 02:23 AM
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Defenitley and vapor barrier.
I have been using a product called REFLECTIC from Menards..It is aluminum foil on both sides and 2 layers of air bubbles in between....This insulates and reflects the heat back into the room..I have built several buildings using this and is well worth it...Comes in 3 widths > 16",24"and 48"..
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Old 05-11-2010, 02:26 AM
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I have been using a product called REFLECTIC from Menards..It is aluminum foil on both sides and 2 layers of air bubbles in between....This insulates and reflects the heat back into the room..I have built several buildings using this and is well worth it...Comes in 3 widths > 16",24"and 48"..
I have used a product very similar on cabin floors. Its called p2000. Its a very thin layer of foam with foil on each side.
Old 05-11-2010, 02:53 AM
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On one of those forums they have an article with pictures of a cabin that was built all from scrap wood and salvaged materials. I cant remember the exact size but it was a nice little cabin and it cost less then $200 to build.
That is what I plan to do when I build my newest small cabin. It will be a partially underground cabin built into my hill - mtnside. It will have several windows looking downhill and even across the valley to the beautiful Snowy Range mountains.
I am going to use some of the fifty plus dead pine trees on my land to build it. Pics of all this probably next winter.

Of course, as some know, I have 5 pic threads showing my sheds and underground shelter, some say bunker.
Which that bunker cost about $2,000 to build but most of that cost was for the 250 plus bags of concrete.
Here is the latest pic thread explaining exactly how I built my underground shelter in several posts > http://www.survivalistboards.com/sho...d.php?t=107463

Although it seems like many, even on this Survivalistboards seem to dislike bunkers, underground storm/fallout shelters even underground houses. Not sure why, possibly they just do not understand all about underground structures.

Here is a good list that gives some of the advantages of underground houses and shelters. >


"We believe that when designed and built
properly on suitable sites, Post/Shoring/
Polyethylene, or PSP, underground dwellings
are the finest that can be constructed.
They have 23 distinct advantages over conventional
structures. These are:

1. NO FOUNDATION. - except the earth.
2. LESS BUILDING MATERIAL. - using lumber or logs.
3. LESS LABOR.
4. MOST AESTHETICALLY PLEASING.
5. LESS TAX.
6. WARM IN WINTER.
7. COOL IN SUMMER.
8. BETTER VIEW. - especially if built on a hillside.
9. BUILT-IN GREENHOUSE.
10. ECOLOGICALLY SOUND.
11. INCREASED YARD SPACE.
12. FALLOUT SHELTER.
13. CUTS ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION.
14. DEFENSIBLE.
15. CONCEALMENT.
16. CLOSER TO SOURCE OF WATER.
17. RELATIVELY FIREPROOF.
18. PIPES NEVER FREEZE.
19. SUPERIOR FLOORING.
20. CAN BE BUILT BY ANYONE.
21. WEATHERPROOF. - extremely good tornado, blizzard and storm protection...
22. LESS MAINTENANCE.
23. SOUNDPROOF."

The previous quote is from Mike Oehler's "The $50 and Up Underground House Book" page 10

Link to some pics of Mike Oehler's > http://www.undergroundhousing.com/structures.html


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Originally Posted by BadgeBunny View Post
We have seen too many people who live in the country on big old acreages who think they are gonna have 15 to 20 people bug out at their place but they have no place to put 15 or 20 people. It amazes me just how short-sighted people who think they have it all figured out can be ...
I must have missed those posts.
Hope you are not talking about me. Although I have had at least 20 people over the past 3 months contact me and say they would like to come up and camp for a while on or near my mtn place.

And from June to Nov. it is fairly warm and mostly snow free on my mtn land. So lots of places to camp in tents or even RVs if people have them.

And IF about 20 people did come up then that would be a Lot of hands to do a Lot of work fairly fast.

It has taken me over 10 years working by myself to build what I have built. Which is quite a bit as I have shown with many pics in 5 threads. Although I still have not shown Everything.

Cleaning out these sheds and other structures, I believe I would have enough room for about 20 people. And hopefully people would come up in July or even Sept. In less than a month with about 20 people, even 5 to 10 strong workers, we could bulld several good strucures. I have 4 woodstoves plus a couple others in storage.
And some 55 gallon drums to make drum stoves. Which put out a Lot of heat.

AND If the SHTF was bad and would last for years I would also have at least one good cabin that a 70 plus yo guy, who I work for, said I could use in an emergency. This cabin could hold 20 people just in this one cabin, if necessary.

A pic of this 2-story cabin below, which I could use in an emergency and especially in a SHTF situation. The old guy who owns this cabin would Not come up since he has an estate about 240 miles away.



Some of the inside of this cabin and notice deep snow high up on the outside of windows, which I spent about 5 hours shoveling the 7 feet of snow off that deck that goes around 3 sides of this fancy cabin, which it also is fully solar powered and has a 1,000 gallon replenishing water tank in the well supplied basement >



And I Hope that I have it All figured out since I have been doing and Living survival and have even dared to call myself a survivalist since 1982. No one has ever called me short or short-sighted and I will always work hard to make sure they have NO reason to ever call me such.
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Old 05-11-2010, 04:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Dr.prepper View Post
I love this little cabin. If I was single I would live in something like this gladly. This little home cost This guy $15,000 to build. With my connections I could do It turn key for around $10,000. Ive seen this company called tiny homes who builds 200 sq ft homes and under and charge $50,000 - $70,000 for them. It amazes me how people will pay over $100,000 to have a small home built when with just a little research, training and help they can build their own for a fraction of that.

http://www.countryplans.com/nash.html

i like the cabin and it looks really nice ..but i would do away with the loft and lowered the roof line intill it was standard a-frame style cabin set up with a 10.ft roof line set up ..

i also use a small mini wood stove to heat the place and propane powered stove and rig unit along with the wood place to keep the place warm and cozy in the winter time.
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