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Old 04-27-2010, 03:41 PM
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Default Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?



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Would fruit that was dehydrated last as long as sugar/flour/beans etc. in a sealed mylar bag in a 5 gallon bucket?

I was thinking of sealing the bags, and putting them in the bucket. Just curious of the storage life.

Thanks!
Old 04-27-2010, 03:47 PM
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Default Re: Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?

Dried fruit's shelf life might be a year or so. The use of mylar bags in buckets is more for longer term storage than that. i.e. beans, rice, wheat stored for 10 years.

If you have access to a fruit tree, I could see dehydrating it every year for winter storage. But I don't think using mylars in buckets would add much value.
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Old 04-27-2010, 05:19 PM
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Default Re: Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?

It won't last 'as long as' rice/beans, etc. However, how long it will stay good will also depend on how much water was removed during the dehydration process. If you dehydrate it till it will crack, and/or pulverize it once dry (i.e. remove at least 95% of its liquid), it will keep much longer than fruit dried to a 'leathery' state. And the longer lasting stuff, if packed very well (probably in smaller packages, and I would also recommend both sealing it in plastic with O2 absorbers, and then again inside mylar), should last well over 2 years I believe.

Why not 'preserve' the fruit, after drying, in alcohol? I keep a HUGE jar filled with brandy and rum to which I add dried fruit all the time. I make fruit cakes from it mostly, but, the fruit will keep virtually forever in there (even if it falls apart after a few years, its essence will still be in the alcohol).
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Old 04-27-2010, 11:26 PM
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Default Re: Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?

If it's properly dried (and sulfured if it's the kind that needs it), it'll last for many years. The food storage companies have been selling dried fruits in buckets for decades. I just ate a #10 can of banana chips that were 12 years old and stored in a hot metal shed the entire time.
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Old 04-27-2010, 11:41 PM
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Default Re: Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?

Checkout http://www.dehydrate2store.com/helpfultips/ for some good tips on storing dehydrated fruits. As far as I know most sufficiently dehydrated fruit will last a decade or more if done properly.
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Old 04-27-2010, 11:42 PM
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Default Re: Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?

btw dried and dehydrated are two completely different things. Dried fruits will not store as long as dehydrated fruits.
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Old 04-28-2010, 12:21 AM
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Default Re: Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?

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Originally Posted by cletus View Post
btw dried and dehydrated are two completely different things. Dried fruits will not store as long as dehydrated fruits.
Dehydrated foods are dried similarly to the way we dry them at home. Warmth and dry air flow. Some of them are even sun dried. If dried to the same moisture content and packaged in a similar low O2 atmosphere, storage life is about the same too.
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Old 04-28-2010, 04:33 PM
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Default Re: Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?

I completely agree MikeK. As long as the moisture content is low it will store for a long time. However, going off what our friend at www.dehydrate2store.com has to say about store bought sundries; she buys bulk dried fruits like blueberries and dehydrates them in order to extend their shelf life as their moisture content is still relatively high.
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Old 04-28-2010, 04:43 PM
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Default Re: Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?

in my experience with dried fruit in mylar, they havent had a terrilby long shelf life.
I have an excalibur dehydrator, I dried bananas and put them in mylar. 6 months later they are inedible. not moldy, but awful, tasteless...
dried cherries are still okay after 6 mths
apples too are okay.
but I dont expect them to last longer than a year.
I have chosen not to dry any more fruit, and to buy it freeze dried in #10 tins.
I have not had great success with dried veggies either. dried celery sealed in mylar or masonjars was bad in 6 months. my dried carrots also after a year are already smelling funny, not moldy but just smelling bad.
so i am going to begin investing in #10 tins from now on as I know they are done properly and will last longer.
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Old 04-28-2010, 04:57 PM
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Default Re: Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?

That's surprising to hear especially about the carrots and celery. Don't mean to be rude but are you sure you're drying them at a high enough temperature and for a sufficient amount of time?
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Old 04-28-2010, 07:05 PM
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Default Re: Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?

yes as far as i know i did. I followed the instructions exactly
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Old 04-28-2010, 07:08 PM
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Default Re: Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?

Because we have access to so much fruit being grown around here, we try to find ways to store it long term, use it in various recipes, find ways to get the most of it because we can experiment just a bit.

Short term drying is fine ... we do it on a tin roof with cheese cloth and it makes for fruit for the brandy jar (also for fruitcakes) and for fried apple pies.

Longer term we take the dried fruit, figs, apples, bananas from the farmer's market and mangos when we can get them from the farmer's market, and we dehydrate it down to crackly. We pack that tight in jars, suck the air out and put the jars in the coolest part of the root cellar. Most of that fruit will last a minimum of two or three years.

Longest term we dry it, either pack it in brandy or chunk bags of it in the freezer. But you can puree even peaches, which we have a lot of, and freeze it for as long as that freezer keeps things frozen.

We like to make fruit jerky too and, if done properly and properly lemoned, dried on pastic wrap and then transfered and rolled in wax paper, then vacuum packed, I've personally experienced it lasting for several years and that was even in a hot car, under a seat where it had fallen and been there for a minimum of three summers. And our summers will push the interiors of cars above 120 degrees in a skinny minute.

UGA has done a lot of research on drying various food items ...

http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/publication..._dry_fruit.pdf

Mizzou has done a lot of research on it as well:

Quote:
Fruits such as apples, pears, peaches, nectarines and apricots require sulfur treatments to prevent browning during the drying process. Sulfur treatments protect vitamins A and C during drying and storage, help retain fresh fruit flavor and increase the shelf life of the fruit. Sulfur treatments destroy thiamin, but most fruits are not good sources of thiamin, so this is not a great concern.

Two types of sulfur treatments are used — sulfuring and sulfite dips (sulfiting).

Sulfuring is the most effective sulfur treatment and results in a minimal loss of water-soluble nutrients; however, it is not very practical. The fumes will irritate eyes and breathing passages, so it must be done outside. It is used primarily for fruits that are going to be sun dried, because sulfured fruits should not be dried inside. Sulfuring is more expensive, more time consuming and more complicated than using sulfite dips. Because sun drying is not a recommended procedure for Missouri, sulfuring is not recommended as an alternative for pretreating fruits.
Sulfite dips can be prepared and used in the kitchen and sulfite-dipped fruits can be dried indoors. There are several disadvantages of sulfite dips. Penetration of sulfite may be uneven, resulting in uneven color retention. The loss of water-soluble nutrients is greater than in sulfured fruit. And, finally, the fruit may absorb water, which will result in a longer drying time.
Soaking times vary with the type of fruit and thickness of slices. (See Table 1 for specific fruits.) Dissolve 3/4 teaspoon to 1-1/2 teaspoons sodium bisulfate per quart of water. (If using sodium sulfite, use 1-1/2 teaspoons to 3 teaspoons. If using sodium meta-bisulfite, use 1 tablespoon to 2 tablespoons.) Place the prepared fruit in the mixture and soak 5 minutes for slices, 15 minutes for halves. Remove fruit, rinse lightly under cold water and place on drying trays. (This solution can be used only once. Make a new one for the next batch.) These chemicals must be of food-grade quality and usually are available at winemaking supply stores, natural foods stores or pharmacies. Prices vary considerably.

Warning
Recent research indicates that certain asthmatics may react adversely to sulfites. Persons who are sensitive to sulfites should avoid preparing or eating sulfite-treated foods. Sulfite fumes will be given off during the drying process; also, if sodium bisulfite is added to water for steam-blanchings, fumes will escape with the steam.
http://extension.missouri.edu/public....aspx?P=GH1563

And you know what .... canning and jams and jellies is still probably the best way to preserve most fruits for most people.
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Old 04-28-2010, 10:45 PM
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Default Re: Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cletus View Post
I completely agree MikeK. As long as the moisture content is low it will store for a long time. However, going off what our friend at www.dehydrate2store.com has to say about store bought sundries; she buys bulk dried fruits like blueberries and dehydrates them in order to extend their shelf life as their moisture content is still relatively high.
The problem with store bought dried fruits is mislabelling. They're considered, in the food industry, as "low moisture" fruits, rather than "dried" yet they mislabel them in the stores. You're right, those won't store well. In fact, they usually use preservatives like sodium metabisulphite in them to give them what shelf life they have.
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Old 04-28-2010, 10:48 PM
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Default Re: Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?

Quote:
Originally Posted by getFOODnow View Post
in my experience with dried fruit in mylar, they havent had a terrilby long shelf life.
I have an excalibur dehydrator, I dried bananas and put them in mylar. 6 months later they are inedible. not moldy, but awful, tasteless...
dried cherries are still okay after 6 mths
apples too are okay.
but I dont expect them to last longer than a year.
I have chosen not to dry any more fruit, and to buy it freeze dried in #10 tins.
I have not had great success with dried veggies either. dried celery sealed in mylar or masonjars was bad in 6 months. my dried carrots also after a year are already smelling funny, not moldy but just smelling bad.
so i am going to begin investing in #10 tins from now on as I know they are done properly and will last longer.
They dip bananas in oil or sugar syrup before dehydration to prevent that problem. There's a trick to some of them, like sulphuring apples. Not hard, but really benefits the taste if you do it.

Maybe you're not getting them dry enough, or you're using too high of heat? I keep my dried veggies and fruits for several years and they stay fine for the most part. I'm using dried carrots from last spring's garden. Okra too. Still fresh as they day I dried them.
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Old 04-28-2010, 11:45 PM
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Default Re: Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?

The drier the fruit is the longer it will store. Putting it into sealed mylar bags with O2 absorbers will extend the shelf life by removing the oxygen which contributes to decay and keeping out moisture from humidity in the air. You should try to get the fruit "crispy" dry, way beyond "leathery" dry. Addition of sulphurs and other preservatives will preserve the fruits color during the drying process as well as giving additional shelf life. You can probably store properly dried fruits for 2-5 years without spoilage, but will lose some nutritional value. Unless you eat huge quantities of fruit, I suggest you store it in small mylar bags so the whole quantity is not exposed to air for a lengthy period after opening it.
"Dried" and "Dehydrated" are the same thing, moisture removed by moving currents of warm air. That is different from "freeze-dried" which gets the food much drier much faster and thus gives longer shelf life.
I suggest if you want really long term storage of fruit, can it or make it into jams, jellies and preserves and can that. It will last many years that way. Pemmican and other traditional Native American foods will also give good storage shelf life.
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Old 04-29-2010, 12:39 AM
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Default Re: Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?

We dehydrate ours and store in glass canning jars, with O2 absorbers in some or using the food saver jar sealing attachment. Some we make into fruit leathers too.

Some fruits we store in the freezer, most I just make into jams and preserves.

I like to dip our bananas in a bit of lemon juice before dehydrating - for some reason it really impacts the flavor and make them taste just fantastic.
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Old 04-29-2010, 09:38 AM
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Default Re: Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?

I dehydrate my foods until crispy and very stiff. I can literally throw them in a blender and make powder of them.

That is the drying consistency that you should shoot for.

I place them in 1 qt or 1 gallon 7 mil mylar with O2 absorber and then place in 5 gal buckets.

If you get thin enough mylar you can even vacuum pack them, vacuum packing does not work with the thicker 6, 7 mil mylar ( I found out the hard way)

On the Dehydrate 2 store website, the lady claims that fruits and veggies will last 30 years or more if PROPERLY dehydrated.

Throw your food on the counter if it makes a loud cripsy noise it's dried, if it makes a dull clumping sound, it's heavy with moisture.
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Old 04-29-2010, 09:46 AM
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Default Re: Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?

I'm most interested in storing dehydrated fruits such as apple and tomato for 1 or 2 years. The idea is I'd be putting these things up for winter/spring consumption instead of using canning techniques.
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Old 04-29-2010, 07:06 PM
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Default Re: Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cletus View Post
That's surprising to hear especially about the carrots and celery. Don't mean to be rude but are you sure you're drying them at a high enough temperature and for a sufficient amount of time?
In fact, the lower temperature you use for drying those foods, the better, within reason. They should be dried at 115 degrees. They can be dried at even lower temperatures I imagine, without harm, though that will take longer. The reason that the lower temperature should be used is so you don't get a hard edge with a still 'wet' center, which, of course, would cause them to go bad faster than if they are consistently dry throughout.

Meats should be dried at higher temperatures, but, vegetables and fruit at lower ones.
Old 04-29-2010, 08:27 PM
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Default Re: Dehydrated Fruit in 5 Gal Buckets with mylar?

We dehydrate a lot of stuff, and store it all with desiccant.

It lasts a long time.

We have stuff here that we still use that is easily 5 years old.
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