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Old 04-19-2010, 01:11 PM
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Default Edible Plants of Pennsylvania?



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I plan to do alot of hiking and back backing this summer in quehanna trail and among other places and was just wondering what plants are good to eat. I know of some already..

Staghorn Sumac
Pine
Fiddleheads
Red & White Clover

I do plan on getting a book sometime but I just thought I'd see what ya'll know about it. Also, I won't ever attempt to identify and eat any mushroom I find in the wild. I got a book on them, but so many of them just look the same and I really don't think it would ever be worth the risk. Not at this point anyways.

Thanks to anyone who replies!
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Old 04-19-2010, 02:02 PM
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Dandylions, elderberries, water cress, cattails, may apples, to name a few.
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Old 04-19-2010, 02:12 PM
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I think fiddleheads and the edible parts of pine are early spring, so summer might be a bit late. Clover and sumac berries should be available though. You might find berries of various types.
Old 04-19-2010, 02:20 PM
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I would honestly just take a class for it. There are a lot of lookalikes between edibles and poisonous and some are edible sometimes and not others and some are edible but only after cooking but toxic before cooking. Take a class and play it safe on this one.
Old 04-19-2010, 02:34 PM
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good post.......................
Old 04-19-2010, 06:58 PM
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Look into the site of Wildman Steve Brill. He's in New York which is botanically similar to Pennsylvania. Maybe you can take some of his classes. A general book that is acceptable is Elias and Dykeman's Edible Plants of North America (2008 or later edition) and two books by Samuel Thayer, The Forager's Harvest and Nature's Garden.
Old 04-19-2010, 07:02 PM
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wellllll I'm glad you asked. I have a youtube channel devoted to edible plants:

http://www.youtube.com/wildedibleplants

I film these in Pennsylvania.
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Old 04-19-2010, 11:24 PM
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Great thread, also from PA and have been looking on info of edible plants here. Thanks for starting this so I didn't have to
I also like learning about medicinal use of plants, and how they can be used to cure infections, disease, etc. Be careful though, herbs can be toxic if ingested in excess. Take a class, but also read some books on the medicinal info on the plants because having too much can do more harm than good (one reason I don't trust those herbal supplements).
Old 04-20-2010, 01:08 PM
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Acorns can be edible. Grind them up and wash the tannin out of them.

During spring time, you can find wild onions. They're all over my yard.

As precautionary measure. You can seed your favorite rural plan B spot with plants too. Different types of turnips along side trails.
Old 04-20-2010, 03:43 PM
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There are many edible plants here. I would invest in a book or two. The book mentioned already, Edible wild plants of North America, by Elias and Dykeman is a good book. I have learned a lot from it. The roots of Queen Anne's lace are edible. The roots of Burdock are also. Young jewel weed shoots can be eaten. Young poke weed shoots can be eaten as long as they are young and there is no purple on them. Wood sorrel is a tasty snack. Barberry leaves and berries are good to flavor your water.
Old 04-25-2010, 09:34 PM
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Default Re: Edible Plants of Pennsylvania?

Depending on what time of year you're planning on going, Hickory nuts are great. Make sure you have a hammer or heavy blunt object to crack them open.
Old 04-25-2010, 09:46 PM
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Default Re: Edible Plants of Pennsylvania?

Eat The Weeds on youtube.com and EatTheWeeds.com are the most watched videos in the world on foraging.

He films in Florida, however most of the plants discussed can be found in the northeast as well.
Old 04-25-2010, 09:55 PM
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Default Re: Edible Plants of Pennsylvania?

Get some books from your local library or have them order some through the interlibrary loan so that you can preview them without cost, then order the ones you might like. You have a whole host of edible plants there.
Go to the book section of www.amazon.com and type in Pennsylvania wild edible plants and read the customer's reviews. That is the first place I look for more good books.
I'd especially find some cattails so that you have a source of food in EVERY season. They grow not just in bodies of water but often in wet ditches too. You may be seeing yellow pollen soon where the cattails form, which is a great high-protein flour. Also available now are the green shoots.
Stinging nettle makes a high energy tea or boiled greens.
Look up pictures of yellow or curly dock...they have a reddish stalk growing on the second year plants that make it easy to spot them from a distance. It makes a better spinach than spinach, and the seed is nutritious as well, or add a few raw leaves to a salad. Dock is my favorite plant.
And I love acorn bread and cookies.
Have fun with it! It's a great hobby even if nothing happened where you had to depend on the edible wild plants, and the whole family can enjoy it together. Some plants are survival only type foods, but many are simply delicious if cooked right.
Old 04-28-2010, 07:56 PM
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Default Re: Edible Plants of Pennsylvania?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Misfit View Post
I plan to do alot of hiking and back backing this summer in quehanna trail and among other places and was just wondering what plants are good to eat. I know of some already..

Staghorn Sumac
Pine
Fiddleheads
Red & White Clover

I do plan on getting a book sometime but I just thought I'd see what ya'll know about it. Also, I won't ever attempt to identify and eat any mushroom I find in the wild. I got a book on them, but so many of them just look the same and I really don't think it would ever be worth the risk. Not at this point anyways.

Thanks to anyone who replies!
Hey mate,

Get a book, learn from an expert. I've been teaching wild edible plants for 15 plus years, and I have seen people really make stupid mistakes over the years.

I write an article every week or so about what is in season at http://www.NativeEyes.com - and we also put up photos.

Remember, take your time, learn from those who know.

What part of Pennsylvania are you from?

Mr 20/20
Old 08-31-2012, 11:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lanahi View Post
Get some books from your local library or have them order some through the interlibrary loan so that you can preview them without cost, then order the ones you might like. You have a whole host of edible plants there.
Go to the book section of www.amazon.com and type in Pennsylvania wild edible plants and read the customer's reviews. That is the first place I look for more good books.
I'd especially find some cattails so that you have a source of food in EVERY season. They grow not just in bodies of water but often in wet ditches too. You may be seeing yellow pollen soon where the cattails form, which is a great high-protein flour. Also available now are the green shoots.
Stinging nettle makes a high energy tea or boiled greens.
Look up pictures of yellow or curly dock...they have a reddish stalk growing on the second year plants that make it easy to spot them from a distance. It makes a better spinach than spinach, and the seed is nutritious as well, or add a few raw leaves to a salad. Dock is my favorite plant.
And I love acorn bread and cookies.
Have fun with it! It's a great hobby even if nothing happened where you had to depend on the edible wild plants, and the whole family can enjoy it together. Some plants are survival only type foods, but many are simply delicious if cooked right.
Hi, how did you learn about cattail pollen becoming flour? Thx!
Old 09-09-2012, 09:15 PM
Saratonin Saratonin is offline
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Wow bringing back this old forum post.

Good timing as I have been reading up on wild edibles in Pennsylvania as well.

There is numerous books on Amazon and eBay and a bunch of websites such as http://www.eattheweeds.com/ and http://blog.emergencyoutdoors.com/ca...e-wild-plants/

Both are my favorites and bookmarked.

I have only eaten Dandilions, Pine Needles, Chicory, and Clover but am looking for more. Proper identification is prudent.
Old 09-22-2012, 02:59 AM
CalicoJack CalicoJack is offline
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Great posts thanks for reviving them.
Old 12-22-2012, 03:42 PM
grantkir grantkir is offline
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Thanks Pabackwoodsman for the youtube links. love dandelion wine and salads
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