Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > Survival & Preparedness Forum > Disaster Preparedness General Discussion
Articles Chat Room Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files



Disaster Preparedness General Discussion Anything Disaster Preparedness or Survival Related

Advertise Here
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-05-2010, 10:15 AM
Chuck Noland's Avatar
Chuck Noland Chuck Noland is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: North Texas
Posts: 181
Thanks: 36
Thanked 280 Times in 77 Posts
Default Eating Diseased Squirrels



Advertise Here

Anyone seen a good youtube video about hunting and eating squirrels? Seems like they would make for great cooking but I'm worried about disease. How would you know if a squirrel is diseased or not? Any ideas?

Chuck
Old 04-05-2010, 10:18 AM
I Buried My Guns's Avatar
I Buried My Guns I Buried My Guns is offline
I'll bring the rope.
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Houston: we have a problem
Posts: 1,288
Thanks: 8,412
Thanked 2,247 Times in 784 Posts
Default

Well, I just try to keep in mind that squirrels are rodents the same as mice and rats, and thus the pathologies inherent to rodents are evident in squirrels also

Don't let the furry tail fool you - they are vectors for disease!
Old 04-05-2010, 10:19 AM
I Buried My Guns's Avatar
I Buried My Guns I Buried My Guns is offline
I'll bring the rope.
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Houston: we have a problem
Posts: 1,288
Thanks: 8,412
Thanked 2,247 Times in 784 Posts
Default

Also, they can taste a bit gamey, so marinating is a must. My neighbor recommends apple juice to remove the "taint" smell.
Old 04-05-2010, 10:31 AM
big country big country is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: West Virginia
Posts: 173
Thanks: 26
Thanked 149 Times in 63 Posts
Default

I've never had a problem eating squirrel! I actually like the taste! We usually slow cook it in a crock pot, though I had Squirrel Fricassee one time that was DELICIOUS! I unfortunately do not have the recipe though, bummer!

What disease are you worried about getting if you cook the meat?

The only issue I know of with squirrel is warbles and they disappear after the first frost in fall. BUT if you need to eat an infected squirrel the website says:

Quote:
This parasite is of no public health significance and properly cooked meat from infected animals is safe to eat.
Last line at the bottom of the article. Just cook it and try not to get grossed out while you're skinning it if you find one!

I haven't seen any other disease problems with squirrels, though I only eat squirrel I take from the woods/wilderness...not "city" squirrels. When they aren't around people eating garbage I think the disease is a lot lower then say mice/rats living in and around people all the time! (no proof, just conjecture/personal experience)

I wouldn't hesitate to eat a squirrel...
The Following User Says Thank You to big country For This Useful Post:
Old 04-05-2010, 10:36 AM
tortminder's Avatar
tortminder tortminder is offline
Hakham Bashi
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: State of Confusion
Posts: 1,966
Thanks: 4,483
Thanked 6,064 Times in 1,336 Posts
Default

At first I thought I was at the wrong website (www.frugalsquirrels.com) and this was a thread on cannibalism!
Old 04-05-2010, 10:40 AM
Sapper6 Sapper6 is offline
Wide awake
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 1,963
Thanks: 2,574
Thanked 2,852 Times in 1,039 Posts
Default

I have eaten plenty of squirrel and haven't had a problem. Just as when you eat any other game fish, bird, or animal, you may just want to be extra wary it if it "looks" diseased or has excessive parasites under the skin. Otherwise, cook it thoroughly and you will be okay. Any animal is subject to disease, so don't get too wrapped around the axel in regard to squirrel.

BTW, depending on where you kill it, squirrel tends to come "pre-marinated" in a way. In areas where there is an abundance of acorns, your squirrel meat will likely taste distinctly nutty. Give it a shot.
Old 04-05-2010, 10:41 AM
smoke63b's Avatar
smoke63b smoke63b is offline
Target Shooter
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 474
Thanks: 443
Thanked 411 Times in 174 Posts
Default

As long as you cook it thoroughly I'm not aware of anything you can get from eating a squirrel.
Old 04-05-2010, 10:45 AM
vicdotcom's Avatar
vicdotcom vicdotcom is offline
Maximus
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 11,738
Thanks: 6,596
Thanked 13,710 Times in 6,123 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuck Noland View Post
Anyone seen a good youtube video about hunting and eating squirrels? Seems like they would make for great cooking but I'm worried about disease. How would you know if a squirrel is diseased or not? Any ideas?

Chuck
Enough fire and heat will take care of most disease (not all though).

Some ways to check for health is the appearance of the squirrel. Does it seem alert or lethargic? If it is not alert and doesnt "look" healthy, it may be old or sick. Take a look at the liver when cleaning it. It should be free of spots or dark patches. Look for worms and parasites. Some are ok but not excessive. Look at the eyes, Make sure they are clear and not cloudy or cruddy.

If they are alert, strong and active, they should be good.

Some people do, but I would stay away from the brain and not eat that part or the spine.
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to vicdotcom For This Useful Post:
Old 04-05-2010, 10:51 AM
PAbackwoodsman's Avatar
PAbackwoodsman PAbackwoodsman is offline
Woodland Survivalist
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: PA, US
Posts: 647
Thanks: 46
Thanked 324 Times in 182 Posts
Default

usually by examining them very closely you can tell if they have a disease. If you want to be safe, only eat one you killed, not one you found dead, and than throughly cook it.
Old 04-05-2010, 10:51 AM
kev's Avatar
kev kev is offline
Forum Administrator
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: East Texas
Age: 46
Posts: 14,780
Thanks: 1,661
Thanked 32,000 Times in 6,731 Posts
Default

When a squirrel is really sick, it will usually be on the ground acting funny. I would imagine that like people, a sick squirrel might lose its sense of balance and go to the ground instead of jumping limb to limb.

If there is any doubt, just cook it / boil it really good.

Just about everything we eat has some kind of disease in it. Whether its squirrel, beef, pork,,, or something else, make sure your food is cooked good.
__________________
Our survival gear Section

If you have a question about the forum, please post it in this section.
General questions sent through private messages will be ignored.
The Following User Says Thank You to kev For This Useful Post:
Old 04-05-2010, 10:58 AM
Chuck Noland's Avatar
Chuck Noland Chuck Noland is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: North Texas
Posts: 181
Thanks: 36
Thanked 280 Times in 77 Posts
Default

Can't squirrels become infected with Rabies? I thought that if an animal is infected with a disease, the bacteria can also be putting out toxins into the animal and those toxins can make you sick or kill you. So, even if you kill the animal and cook it really well done, the toxins can still getcha'. Is that correct or is that mis-information I was told?
Old 04-05-2010, 11:00 AM
kev's Avatar
kev kev is offline
Forum Administrator
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: East Texas
Age: 46
Posts: 14,780
Thanks: 1,661
Thanked 32,000 Times in 6,731 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuck Noland View Post
Can't squirrels become infected with Rabies?
Any warm blooded mammal can carry rabies.
__________________
Our survival gear Section

If you have a question about the forum, please post it in this section.
General questions sent through private messages will be ignored.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to kev For This Useful Post:
Old 04-05-2010, 11:01 AM
PAbackwoodsman's Avatar
PAbackwoodsman PAbackwoodsman is offline
Woodland Survivalist
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: PA, US
Posts: 647
Thanks: 46
Thanked 324 Times in 182 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuck Noland View Post
Can't squirrels become infected with Rabies? I thought that if an animal is infected with a disease, the bacteria can also be putting out toxins into the animal and those toxins can make you sick or kill you. So, even if you kill the animal and cook it really well done, the toxins can still getcha'. Is that correct or is that mis-information I was told?
I thought you could only get rabies if a sick animal bites you and it's infected saliva breaks your skin and gets into your bloodstream/ wound. BUT I could be wrong, so don't quote me.
Old 04-05-2010, 11:34 AM
FarmerJohn FarmerJohn is offline
This is a great survival forum
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,302
Thanks: 6,762
Thanked 26,427 Times in 10,443 Posts
Default

If you cook it thouroghly most problems will be avoided as most germs are killed by high heat
Old 04-05-2010, 11:40 AM
Sapper6 Sapper6 is offline
Wide awake
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 1,963
Thanks: 2,574
Thanked 2,852 Times in 1,039 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kev View Post
Just about everything we eat has some kind of disease in it. Whether its squirrel, beef, pork,,, or something else, make sure your food is cooked good.
Excellent point! Every single fish, bird, animal, and insect has parasites to some degree. Even people all have parasites. Although I won't eat something that is visibly diseased, I plan on having to kill the parasites in everything I kill and cook.
Old 04-05-2010, 11:41 AM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 51
Posts: 48,717
Thanks: 87,118
Thanked 97,305 Times in 31,903 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuck Noland View Post
Can't squirrels become infected with Rabies? I thought that if an animal is infected with a disease, the bacteria can also be putting out toxins into the animal and those toxins can make you sick or kill you. So, even if you kill the animal and cook it really well done, the toxins can still getcha'. Is that correct or is that mis-information I was told?
Heat kills viruses so there's no worry about contracting rabies and stuff. I'd still avoid eating the brain though, just to be safe. As for toxins, most sicknesses are causes by our body's own reactions. The toxin level, if present is very low. A small critter doesn't have a lot of blood volume. A toxin level high enough to make us sick from eating it would have killed the critter before we got to it.

As always make sure the animal is healthy. If it's obviously sick, bypass it. Even at that, it's still probably safe to eat if cooked thoroughly, but why risk it if you can help it.

What would worry me more is prions. Those are rogue proteins that cooking doesn't destroy. They're responsible for such diseases as Mad Cow. I read a report about a doctor treating several patients with Crutchfeld-Jacobs disease, and all of them had in the past, eaten squirrel brains.
Old 04-05-2010, 11:48 AM
Sapper6 Sapper6 is offline
Wide awake
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 1,963
Thanks: 2,574
Thanked 2,852 Times in 1,039 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuck Noland View Post
Can't squirrels become infected with Rabies? I thought that if an animal is infected with a disease, the bacteria can also be putting out toxins into the animal and those toxins can make you sick or kill you. So, even if you kill the animal and cook it really well done, the toxins can still getcha'. Is that correct or is that mis-information I was told?
Its not enough of a threat to panic over. Although any animal can contract rabies (as Kev stated), it is primarily a disease that effects carnivores. Usually, when you hear of rabies going around, you'll be warned about staying away from coons, foxes, bobcats, coyotes, etc.) The smallest herbivores do not typically carry rabies simply because they do not typically survive attacks from the animals that typically do.
The Following User Says Thank You to Sapper6 For This Useful Post:
Old 04-05-2010, 12:15 PM
packitnow packitnow is offline
Target Shooter
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: South Central, KY
Posts: 401
Thanks: 687
Thanked 190 Times in 103 Posts
Default

Squirrels are plentiful here and have been eaten locally for many generations.
Old 04-05-2010, 12:21 PM
kev's Avatar
kev kev is offline
Forum Administrator
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: East Texas
Age: 46
Posts: 14,780
Thanks: 1,661
Thanked 32,000 Times in 6,731 Posts
Default

Rabies is spread through bites and the saliva that penetrates into the wound. That being said, its unlikely that a small animal such as a squirrel will survive a severe bite. Everything is so compact, that a good bite will more then likely kill the poor animal. But its not impossible that a squirrel would contract rabies.

If anything, its more likely that ground dwelling animals such as the fox, coyote, raccoon and possum would come into contact with an infected animal, get bit and live to spread the disease.

Every year, the State of Texas has a vaccination air drop to help immunize foxes and coyotes against rabies. They take these pieces of food, and wrap it around a rabies pill. Its then dropped by airplane over parts of Texas where animals are known to have rabies.

http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/news/releases/20081229.shtm

Quote:
The Texas Department of State Health Services’ annual airdrop of vaccine baits, credited with turning the tide against the spread of rabies strains carried by coyotes and gray foxes, will begin next week. Some 2.9 million baits will be dropped over parts of 41 Texas counties.

“The purpose has been to create and maintain zones of vaccinated coyotes in South Texas and gray foxes in West-Central Texas to prevent the spread of rabies to other animals and humans and to eventually eliminate canine and gray fox rabies in Texas,” said DSHS veterinarian Ernest Oertli, director of the department’s Oral Rabies Vaccination Program.
__________________
Our survival gear Section

If you have a question about the forum, please post it in this section.
General questions sent through private messages will be ignored.
Old 04-05-2010, 12:48 PM
Discordish's Avatar
Discordish Discordish is offline
Survive... for what?
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: SW Wisconsin
Age: 32
Posts: 1,417
Thanks: 1,205
Thanked 1,391 Times in 569 Posts
Default

I tried my hand at squirrel hunting last year... got 3-4. All of them had sores, scab covered on their undersides. I decided that it be best to not eat them - went to taco bell instead.
The Following User Says Thank You to Discordish For This Useful Post:
Reply

Bookmarks



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:07 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright Kevin Felts 2006 - 2012,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net