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Old 01-08-2017, 11:26 AM
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(Longish post) Me and my lady keep on having the same argument regarding where to build our future off grid cabin. We live in eastern Massachusetts at the moment but would like to move someday in order to start up a new homestead. It's going to be a half homestead, half living off of what nature provides set up. Were going to have a garden for produce, chickens for eggs, goat(s) for milk, bees for honey, and mabie some sheep for wool. Everything else is going to come from the land around me.

So I want to move north to the White mountain area in New Hampshire to start this new life, but she wants to move south to where it's warmer to do it. She believes we would have a better growing season in the south (and she hates the cold). I believe we would do just fine in the mountains of NH for all of our needs.

Is there anybody out there with homesteads in NH and above, and in the south on the east coast that can give me some pros and cons to living off the land in these areas? I would appreciate the input.
Old 01-08-2017, 12:34 PM
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The growing season in the White mountains will a lot shorter than it would be in South Carolina. As to the half living off what nature provides, that will require access to a lot of land for two, or more people. Creating a food forest along with guerrilla gardening would help. Are you experienced in food production in the north? Do you plan on buying a large track or a small track of land and harvesting from neighboring land? What kind of hunting or fishing do you have experience in?
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Old 01-08-2017, 12:42 PM
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why does your location say Rhode Island, but you say you are in Massachusetts? Just curious..

We just did this, and we looked at 4 States when we bought property ( we were living in Florida before, which is , to me, a hot , humid miserable hell hole so forget Florida..sorry for any Floridians that are going to take offense to that in advance, it is how I feel )
We looked in North Carolina, Virginia, Vermont and Maine (not West Virginia because they have really strange laws regarding mineral rights under the ground of your land, not the rest of the States because of bad State laws, like gun laws, taxes and such). One of my requirements was mountains and no more than 1 hour from the nearest ski area, since it is my favorite thing to do for fun in winter. Oh yeah, we did not look in New Hampshire because property is expensive there and property taxes are high. This is one of the reasons we didn't buy anything in Vermont either. We couldn't find any decent farmland in Maine, all the reasonable priced property was mostly woods, or in the flat desolate area next to the ocean near the Canadian border. So we ended up finding the perfect property in Virginia. It has low property taxes, it's a farm complete with buildings, love the neighbors ( Amish, and a few likeminded other farmers) , it is cold but not too cold ( well most of the time, it is very cold right now, New England cold to be honest). I am glad we did NOT buy property in New England, no matter how much I loved skiing at Stowe, because it is hard on the livestock to have cold weather. They are in the barn all day, they are eating hay, you have to use a lot of straw for bedding, the water freezes in a short amount of time, you can't go anywhere if you are on a non maintained road ( we are) unless you plow it yourself. So, ultimately, I am glad we are in Virginia and not New England. Plus, people in the South are of course nicer:-) (yes, we have a Confederate flag). Good luck!
 
Old 01-08-2017, 12:46 PM
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Can you compromise? There is a HUGE amount of land between the White Mountains and "south". Also, the lower White mountains would be warmer than the upper mountains and have a longer growing season as well.
Old 01-08-2017, 02:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Freebirde View Post
The growing season in the White mountains will a lot shorter than it would be in South Carolina. As to the half living off what nature provides, that will require access to a lot of land for two, or more people. Creating a food forest along with guerrilla gardening would help. Are you experienced in food production in the north? Do you plan on buying a large track or a small track of land and harvesting from neighboring land? What kind of hunting or fishing do you have experience in?
I plan on utilizing permaculture and other self sustaining growing practices for plant based food and medicine.(we mushroom hunt too) I have experiance with growing vegetables in New England but I'm still learning. I also plan on utilizing cold frames and/or a greenhouse combined with cold tolerant plants. I'm not sure how big our land will be yet, but I plan on at least being surrounded by public land or state land for hunting and fishing. I can fish but I need more experiance in hunting, but none of this is happening any time soon, so I'm going to use this time to learn and practice what I need to live this kind of life.
Old 01-08-2017, 02:19 PM
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[QUOTE=sonya1;13062834]why does your location say Rhode Island, but you say you are in Massachusetts? Just curious..

I moved recently
Old 01-08-2017, 02:24 PM
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1. Its cold up north for too long.
2. The east coast has hurricanes.
3. The deep south has tornado's and its hot..(where I live)
4. West/south central Kentucky. Land is not too expensive, lower cost of living, never too hot, never too cold, plenty of everything,,
5. After 5 years of research>>This is where I am moving asap!
Old 01-08-2017, 02:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kansas Terri View Post
Can you compromise? There is a HUGE amount of land between the White Mountains and "south". Also, the lower White mountains would be warmer than the upper mountains and have a longer growing season as well.
I am willing to compromise. I just happen to really like the White mountains area, especially the clean rivers. I have drank out of several rivers up there for days at a time and didn't get sick.
Old 01-08-2017, 02:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 5keepers View Post
1. Its cold up north for too long.
2. The east coast has hurricanes.
3. The deep south has tornado's and its hot..(where I live)
4. West/south central Kentucky. Land is not too expensive, lower cost of living, never too hot, never too cold, plenty of everything,,
5. After 5 years of research>>This is where I am moving asap!
I will keep that in mind.
Old 01-09-2017, 04:07 PM
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Agree with the post about the incredibly loooong winters up in New Hampster...

While it's pretty up in New England, you would seldom see the outdoors crouched next to the wood stove for months on end....

While the growing season is long down in the south... (it lasts longer than the mater plants!), the soil tends to be played out.... Remember the stories about King cotton?

Living in the deep south is all about rebuilding the soil....

And... battling drought....

And still... I wouldn't live up in the cold on a bet... People freeze to death up there!

While being a bit westward might sound like a decent compromise, with global warming and fracking to deal with.... it's gonna be a crapshoot where ever you choose....

Maybe ask yourself.... How well do you get along with the ole lady? Is it worth putting up with a bit of heat to keep her happy?

Remember, you can always get in the goldfish pond to cool off in the summer.... and... there are times up in the cold where it isn't possible to put enough layers on.
Old 01-09-2017, 05:19 PM
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What difference does it make if you like one area over the other? Remember
"Happy wife, happy life."
Like you really have a choice. Just save yourself the trouble and give in quickly. Save you a lot of problems later.
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Old 01-09-2017, 07:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rock Balancer View Post
... (and she hates the cold)
That ends it.

Do not put anyone in a place they hate. Seriously.

They will hate it, and you for making them do it.



Quote:
... I believe we would do just fine in the mountains of NH for all of our needs.

Is there anybody out there with homesteads in NH and above, and in the south on the east coast that can give me some pros and cons to living off the land in these areas? I would appreciate the input.
I am a Californian. We migrated to Maine after I retired.

Maine easily offers all you want and more. Land is cheap, taxes are low, the COL is low, there is a strong local culture of fierce independence, we have more farms every year, farming is growing here.

I built our house. We are on solar power. We are organic farmers.

We came here with 2 kids still living at home. My pension is $1480/month and that has been enough to keep us going long enough for our farm production to kick in.



However, if your partner does not like it here. If you want to keep this partner. If you want your life to be happy with this partner. Go somewhere else.

You are welcome to come up here, play tourist, swing by and tour our homestead, have dinner with us. There may be a chance that Maine can win her over.

Maine's biggest economy is tourism. Tourists from all over New England flock here all summer to play. Then they leave. Most of them are severely frightened of Northern winters. I get it. The fear becomes mythological and there is no reasoning with it.
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Old 01-09-2017, 07:19 PM
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Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Arkansas. Inexpensive land, good tax structure, friendly gun laws, mild weather.
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Old 01-09-2017, 07:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonya1 View Post
... We couldn't find any decent farmland in Maine, all the reasonable priced property was mostly woods, or in the flat desolate area next to the ocean near the Canadian border.
Good point. Land that has been maintained cleared for tilling is hard to find. The forest encroaches so much every year, that you expend effort to push it back.

We bought forest land, which is fine for livestock.

We cleared some then put in 'forest-garden' designed landscape, or fruit / nut trees and medicinal herbs. I am not tilling anything. Tilling is way too much work for me. We are strictly organic no-till.



Quote:
... it is hard on the livestock to have cold weather. They are in the barn all day, they are eating hay, you have to use a lot of straw for bedding, the water freezes in a short amount of time
Must be much colder there than what we see here.

I have never used straw for our hens. Our pigs are free-ranging out in the woods. Where they bed down is their choice. Sheep, goats, horses all do fine in this area, without the added amendments you list.
Old 01-09-2017, 09:07 PM
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Somewhere around Wichita, Kansas. Winters can get cold but not heavy snow, summers can get hot but long growing season. Kansas feeds half the world. East of the dry line where the arid west begins so plenty of water, but not so east that it's heavy humidity.

Or maybe not. I'm in Colorado and I'm not moving to Kansas.
Old 01-09-2017, 09:17 PM
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... Kansas feeds half the world.
Kansas ranks 7 behind, California, Texas, Iowa, Nebraska, Minnesota and Illinois.

http://www.stuffaboutstates.com/agriculture/
Old 01-09-2017, 09:32 PM
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Living in Colorado, the wife and I have had the same discussion over and over. Colorado is starting to crawl with people, especially on the front range and it isn't the best place to live in regard to survival WSHTF.

Do we go north to Wyoming or Montana or even Idaho????? Or....do we go south to New Mexico or Arizona or even West Texas?????

I do think a lot of folks will flock to the mountains thinking there is safety and security and water and food there, so unless it is terribly remote....I nearly think south eastern Colorado or north eastern New Mexico might be smart.

I respect all the eastern US folks for thinking about preparations, but I would not want to live east of the Mississippi River for anything.....no way. I think it is going to be too hard to survive in the east with the massive amount of population.

Wyoming has 1 person to 104 acres
New Hampshire has 1 person to 4.5 acres


........
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Old 01-09-2017, 09:39 PM
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Agree with 'Happy Wife, Happy Life'.

Agree with 'hate the cold'.

Virginia -- towards West VA.

North Carolina -- stay 100 miles from coast.

South Carolina -- ditto.

GA -- they have mountains too.

If you prep for Hurricanes and have a house that can take them, then you are already set -- it is just a matter of extending your preps.
Old 01-09-2017, 10:25 PM
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I grew up on a farm in north central Iowa. Four months of winter, several feet of snow each storm, livestock chores at 20 below.

When I retired, I bought land 600 miles further south. Winters in Eastern Oklahoma last two months.
We get a few winter nights with temps in the teens and single digits (above zero) and 4-6" of snow.

I suggest looking at 6-8 areas. Spend the time visiting them with wife. Give her the final choice.
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Old 01-10-2017, 10:41 AM
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As long as she can keep warm, my partner said herself she wouldn't mind the cold if she can find clothes that actually work for winter, since women's clothes tend to revolve around fashion instead of practicality. Yoga pants and thin, polyester jackets just don't cut it. Iv been introducing her to wool and she likes it allot.

I'm willing to look at other states other than NH, I just want someplace that is temperate so we can have four seasons. I suppose a place with a mild winter, but not an unreasonably hot summer would be good. As long as there is woods, a few (or allot) mountains, and water (lakes, rivers, ect) then we're good.
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