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Old 01-02-2017, 03:21 AM
Cannabiscuredcancer Cannabiscuredcancer is offline
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If there is an emergency in your area that requires evacuation, having an RV (truck camper, travel trailer, 5th wheel, motorhome) would give you a flexible bugout option.

Now in the past, people have pointed out some negatives; bullets can penetrate the walls, and they catch attention as having resources. Well so a mobile home that someone lives in also is easily penetrated by bullets, that doesn't mean everyone that lives in a mobile home now must move into a house when they can't afford it. Any vehicle or home is a possible resource for pillaging, an RV really isn't any different.

This is for someone that wants to keep all their options open, and does not already have a place to bugout. If you already have the perfect location, by all means don't let the flexibility of having portable shelter and a place to keep your stuff interfere with your mountain cabin. But not everyone has a mountain cabin, I sure don't. Even if I did, I see value in an RV, it's a given' portable shelter.

SO let's say you live in a city of 100 thousand people, and there is an evacuation because there is a power outage and the nuclear power plant is going to melt down. Let's also assume that there is general chaos in other outlying cities, and let's say that you don't have enough money to move and get an apartment or house elswhere, or spend thousand in hotel. But you ave this used RV that you wisely invested $1000-$4000 on, just in case. And of course they come in handy as a guest room, and to take camping traveling etc.

SO when the stuff hits the fan, now you have a place to stay. You just simply sleep in the RV. That means you can evacuate with your preps, and have a place to stay. So now you should already have a place in mind to bugout to. You looked in advance at the downwinder's map, so you know where the wind would blow the radiation, you simply park your RV elsewhere. Now you and your family have a place to stay, no matter what happens in your town. Take your RV, go park it up in the mountains. Now you can either stay in the RV, or go make camp further away from civilization. You could abandon the RV and try and make escape or just stay in it depending on the threat assessment. If it was really bad you could use the RV to trap your enemies and ambush them when they try and seize your goods.

In summary; an RV has several advantages over permanent location, and especially for those with no alternate location at all.
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Old 01-02-2017, 05:16 AM
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Have a couple of them & will evac to our BOL caravan style with multiple 4 wheel-drive vehicles.
(that is, if possible)



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Old 01-02-2017, 05:23 AM
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It's not a bad idea at all. If you live in an area where natural disasters leave you with that option. Here in Western Washington our only serious form of natural disaster is earthquakes. Obviously we are expecting a huge one soon and I doubt an RV would be much use after that since they need roads and our bridges will be toast. I would definitely get one if I lived in a hurricane area though. Plenty of warning and they happen every year.
 
Old 01-02-2017, 05:59 AM
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There's some value in this type of planning. An vehicle bugout will rely on passable roads, bridges, etc.; however, an RV, Fifth Wheel or similar trailer all provide much more storage capacity even if they may be limited to road conditions.

We have been considering getting one. Most of our recreational activities revolve around backpacking, so we are already traveling pretty light and an RV wouldn't make it to most places we go. We have really been researching into modified 4WD vans, truck/campers, etc. We've done a few trips out West and cross-country where flexibility is nice when traveling. An RV or trailer would limit mobility and access to a degree but would really offer some comfort long-term. For right now, our three-season comfort can be had on any trail with a pack as long as we have water and can get resupplied every 10 days or so

My only caution with a trailer and the disadvantages of maneuverability is that it needs to be prepped, stocked and ready to go just like your bug-out bag. Even with regional natural disasters such as the recent fires in TN, or the typical hurricanes that affect the South and Eastern seaboard, making the decision to bugout early enough to avoid traffic is paramount to a successful bugout. The same would apply to a major catastrophe, but would likely give you less time to decide and react. I do like the idea that if the unfortunate even of a house-fire, if your RV is stored separately, it would be a Godsend for an immediate shelter while you work through the insurance issues.

My in-laws spent the last decade or so traveling around the country in their trailer doing camp-host work for reduced or free access in state and national park campsites. They loved it, but health is keeping them closer to home (still doing the camp-hosting, just in FL near home). It was a great way to stay in "bugout" shape and mindset yet still enjoy life!

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Old 01-02-2017, 07:21 AM
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Originally Posted by ROCK6 View Post
There's some value in this type of planning. An vehicle bugout will rely on passable roads, bridges, etc.; however, an RV, Fifth Wheel or similar trailer all provide much more storage capacity even if they may be limited to road conditions.

..........

My only caution with a trailer and the disadvantages of maneuverability is that it needs to be prepped, stocked and ready to go just like your bug-out bag. ROCK6
Agree.......... both of ours are WELL stocked.
So once the gun safe content is loaded, we can jump in & go.

If we have the time? Can also load more gear/supplies/food/fuel into them. Have about a dozen loaded duffle bags & packs hanging in the garage in various configurations, with differing gear/supplies in them that are ready to toss in & go.

We have plan 1, 2, 3 & 4 to bug out.
Plus done a few trial runs.

TIME... how much we have....to bug out......is the biggest factor.
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Old 01-02-2017, 07:42 AM
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I work on RV's for a living and there are caveats, especially long term. RV's, even the ones that cost into the millions, are as cheaply made as possible. The roof joists are typically ripped 2x4s, covered with thin easily torn rubber sheets. Certain models of refrigerators are notorious for catching on fire and they are plagued with electrical problems. What are you going to do when you need to leave pronto, but the solenoid for your slide room stopped working. It's not unusual for them to leak from the factory and eventually you WILL have rot problems. Also, if you hit anything or anything hits you, there's typically a lot of damage that can't be fixed in the field. Patched up, maybe, but not fixed. Think long and hard about getting an RV as a prep. I wouldn't.
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Old 01-02-2017, 07:55 AM
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Remember a normal weekday's traffic? Now imagine that with several abandoned vehicles and accidents caused by people getting stuck while trying to leave town. Think you're going to roll through that with an RV?

Maybe if you leave well before something happens. Then it has a use. In any situation where you see you have to evacuate -now-, the roads will be sealed up tighter than you can imagine.
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Old 01-02-2017, 07:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlphaSierraCharlie View Post
I work on RV's for a living and there are caveats, especially long term. RV's, even the ones that cost into the millions, are as cheaply made as possible. The roof joists are typically ripped 2x4s, covered with thin easily torn rubber sheets. Certain models of refrigerators are notorious for catching on fire and they are plagued with electrical problems. What are you going to do when you need to leave pronto, but the solenoid for your slide room stopped working. It's not unusual for them to leak from the factory and eventually you WILL have rot problems. Also, if you hit anything or anything hits you, there's typically a lot of damage that can't be fixed in the field. Patched up, maybe, but not fixed. Think long and hard about getting an RV as a prep. I wouldn't.
^^^I can attest to this!
I currently stay at a campground and have been here for months. There are people that come here with brand new $200k RVs that leak like you wouldn't believe. One RV had 30+ major defects including electrical, plumbing, insulation, leaks, and alignment issues. The most issues are coming from Keystone RVs.
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Old 01-02-2017, 08:38 AM
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I think a heavy duty small trailer is a good idea but a large rv is tough to get through rush hour in Chicago let along a shtf event. I have an old tubed Willy jeep trailer from WWII. Great off road capabilities and can go more places than any of my 4x4's will go. Holds 1 1/2 yard of compost too. Coils over leaf springs. Put one of those SUV roof rack tents on top and it would be an excellent bug out trailer.

A trailer hitch storage rack is another option. Holds 6-800lbs and can hold a good amount of stuff. Bonus is it has no extra wheels. Downside is, unless tarped, everyone can see what you have.

New RV's are nice but I would take a 60's-70's airstream over a modern rv with multiple slides.
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Old 01-02-2017, 08:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_Rafe View Post
Remember a normal weekday's traffic? Now imagine that with several abandoned vehicles and accidents caused by people getting stuck while trying to leave town. Think you're going to roll through that with an RV?

Maybe if you leave well before something happens. Then it has a use. In any situation where you see you have to evacuate -now-, the roads will be sealed up tighter than you can imagine.
ok, sit in the grid lock in your car, or rv with toilet, supplies, and even a degree of comfort except for the not moving part?
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Old 01-02-2017, 09:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cannabiscuredcancer View Post
If there is an emergency in your area that requires evacuation, having an RV (truck camper, travel trailer, 5th wheel, motorhome) would give you a flexible bugout option.

Now in the past, people have pointed out some negatives; bullets can penetrate the walls, and they catch attention as having resources. Well so a mobile home that someone lives in also is easily penetrated by bullets, that doesn't mean everyone that lives in a mobile home now must move into a house when they can't afford it. Any vehicle or home is a possible resource for pillaging, an RV really isn't any different.

This is for someone that wants to keep all their options open, and does not already have a place to bugout. If you already have the perfect location, by all means don't let the flexibility of having portable shelter and a place to keep your stuff interfere with your mountain cabin. But not everyone has a mountain cabin, I sure don't. Even if I did, I see value in an RV, it's a given' portable shelter.

SO let's say you live in a city of 100 thousand people, and there is an evacuation because there is a power outage and the nuclear power plant is going to melt down. Let's also assume that there is general chaos in other outlying cities, and let's say that you don't have enough money to move and get an apartment or house elswhere, or spend thousand in hotel. But you ave this used RV that you wisely invested $1000-$4000 on, just in case. And of course they come in handy as a guest room, and to take camping traveling etc.

SO when the stuff hits the fan, now you have a place to stay. You just simply sleep in the RV. That means you can evacuate with your preps, and have a place to stay. So now you should already have a place in mind to bugout to. You looked in advance at the downwinder's map, so you know where the wind would blow the radiation, you simply park your RV elsewhere. Now you and your family have a place to stay, no matter what happens in your town. Take your RV, go park it up in the mountains. Now you can either stay in the RV, or go make camp further away from civilization. You could abandon the RV and try and make escape or just stay in it depending on the threat assessment. If it was really bad you could use the RV to trap your enemies and ambush them when they try and seize your goods.

In summary; an RV has several advantages over permanent location, and especially for those with no alternate location at all.
Whenever people think of bugging out and shtf a lot of times they go right to the Mad Max scenario, but the probability is it will be an evacuation or something similar to what you said.
The idea is to not be a homeless refugee who ran out of their house with the clothes on your back and little else.
I think it's an excellent idea to have an RV, I'm partial to the truck camper RV because you're not limited to paved roads.
When people think of a 4x4 bugout vehicle they think of severe conditions, but the probability is you'll need to be able to drive through a roadside ditch and along some grassy areas to get off a stalled congested highway. Would be good to have bolt cutters to cut the cables that they use for guard rails in a lot of areas. Me, I have a small oxy acetylene outfit and will cut off a guardrail section if need be.
As for the downsides, if society is so bad that people will be shooting into random campers, if you aren't with a group of likeminded individuals you're probably going to die anyway. Unless your bugout vehicle is an mrap with a 150 gallon fuel tank.
At a time like that EVERYTHING will be a target to marauder type people and you'll be accosted whether you're on foot, in an RV, or in an suv.

I think it's better to prepare for 95% of what could happen, and then go beast mode if the situation gets worse than that. If you're prepared for 95% of what can happen, you'll be good to go.
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Old 01-02-2017, 09:23 AM
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My daughter and son-in-law own a good sized RV repair business. They would never live in an RV by choice. They are made CHEAP. Even the most expensive RVs have frequent and expensive repairs. My DD & DSil are always telling people RVs are not made to be lived in.

An RV would probably be most useful in a personal SHTF moment such as a fire or flood, where you needed an immediate place to stay. Personally, I'd rather live in an RV temporarily than an apartment or motel room, especially since I have pets to evacuate as well. However, unless you're religious with regular inspections and repairs, you're likely to find yourself unable to use the RV in a crisis.
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Old 01-02-2017, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Revmgt View Post
Whenever people think of bugging out and shtf a lot of times they go right to the Mad Max scenario, but the probability is it will be an evacuation or something similar to what you said.
The idea is to not be a homeless refugee who ran out of their house with the clothes on your back and little else.
I think it's an excellent idea to have an RV, I'm partial to the truck camper RV because you're not limited to paved roads.
When people think of a 4x4 bugout vehicle they think of severe conditions, but the probability is you'll need to be able to drive through a roadside ditch and along some grassy areas to get off a stalled congested highway. Would be good to have bolt cutters to cut the cables that they use for guard rails in a lot of areas. Me, I have a small oxy acetylene outfit and will cut off a guardrail section if need be.
As for the downsides, if society is so bad that people will be shooting into random campers, if you aren't with a group of likeminded individuals you're probably going to die anyway. Unless your bugout vehicle is an mrap with a 150 gallon fuel tank.
At a time like that EVERYTHING will be a target to marauder type people and you'll be accosted whether you're on foot, in an RV, or in an suv.

I think it's better to prepare for 95% of what could happen, and then go beast mode if the situation gets worse than that. If you're prepared for 95% of what can happen, you'll be good to go.
This is my thought too. Most evacuations aren't going to be for end of the world situations...but hurricanes and other weather events. My camper is already my BOB and ready to go. Forest and house fires are the only BO event in my area. An RV is a great solution but I don't think buying one is feasible for BO unless it's something you already use.

RVs aren't made to be lived in, but that doesn't mean they can't be...thousands of people do it, and do it successfully. I'll be one of them in 9 months.
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Old 01-02-2017, 11:20 AM
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I used to have a 35 foot Pace Arrow and that was exactly my plan, other than the obvious recreations part. The only real problem is it can only be self sustaining for about a week. A bit longer if you are real conservative. So, it will be best if you are headed to an area that has power, weather, gas and propane. But, in a pinch, it's a very good option..
Old 01-02-2017, 12:33 PM
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lol, people like this is why there's going to be gridlock and the roads useless...

like labor day weekend on steroids....

i live in the mountains, RV's and 5th wheels are already the bane of my existence when they are driving 45mph over the pass every weekend, the only shining light is they likely won't make it this far if there was a bug out situation in the city.
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Old 01-02-2017, 12:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Turtle'sPace View Post
My daughter and son-in-law own a good sized RV repair business. They would never live in an RV by choice. They are made CHEAP. Even the most expensive RVs have frequent and expensive repairs. My DD & DSil are always telling people RVs are not made to be lived in.

An RV would probably be most useful in a personal SHTF moment such as a fire or flood, where you needed an immediate place to stay. Personally, I'd rather live in an RV temporarily than an apartment or motel room, especially since I have pets to evacuate as well. However, unless you're religious with regular inspections and repairs, you're likely to find yourself unable to use the RV in a crisis.
I understand your point, but then why do literally thousands of people live in RVs full time if they're just crap? Don't forget that millions of people live in housing built little to no better than RVs.

We had a travel trailer for a couple of years, and I thought a lot about using it for bug-out purposes. It could be done, but there are some major issues that must be addressed.

First of all, no RV, even a large motor home, is going to be able to provide you with all the comforts of home for longer than about a week, two at the very most. This is mainly due to a limited supply of water. Few towable RVs have more than 50 gallons of fresh water, and many have 30 gallons or fewer. The main consumer of fresh water is the shower. My wife and I could both take 'Navy' showers (turn on the water just long enough to wet yourself, then shut it off while you soap up, then quickly rinse yourself) for about two days only plus flushing our toilet very quickly. Just washing dishes can consume five gallons of water if you're not careful.

In an evacuation scenario, everyone else with an RV will have the same idea as you, and campgrounds with water hookups will fill up very quickly. Granted, as long as you can connect to a regular hose outlet, you can get access to fresh water, but even that may be impossible in an a large evacuation. You could store some extra fresh water in 15 gallon food-grade drums, but you'll need a couple of moderately strong people to move them around or refill your RV's tank since they will weigh nearly 130 pounds each.

Second, you'll need a means of disposing of your gray water. The black water (sewage) tanks will last a long time, especially if you can do your business outside the RV. But the gray water tanks will fill up quickly, especially if you're able to add fresh water to the rig. Frankly, I have no problem dumping gray water on the side of the road since it's just water, soap, and perhaps a few food particles. I wouldn't dump into a body of water since the soap could kill fish, but it will fertilize plants.

Third, you'll need electricity as well, though this isn't as big of a problem as water. You probably won't need electricity 24/7, but you'll need to occasionally recharge your RV's batteries and perhaps run the AC and TV a bit. If you're only running your generator for a couple of hours a day, a couple of five gallon cans of gasoline should last at least as long as your fresh water supply. Alternatively, if you store gasoline in 15 gallon HDPE drums, which are far more durable than cans, these will work even better.

Fourth, you need to think about fuel for the RV or the vehicle pulling your RV. You may get as little as six MPG, and you probably won't get more than 15 on the high side. Unless you have a class A motorhome with a large fuel tank, you won't be able to drive far on your own, especially if you want to make the return trip without refueling.

Overall, I think that an RV can be an effective bug-out resource, but you have to be aware of their limitations and do all you can to deal with them before you bug-out.
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Old 01-02-2017, 01:04 PM
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Old 01-02-2017, 02:04 PM
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I'm thinking about buying a travel trailer in a few years when I retire.

The only way I can see buying a second home or RV is:

1) All my debt is paid and I can afford it (and all future costs of ownership).
2) I'll actually use and enjoy it....alot, getting my moneys worth. I wouldn't buy one just have as a prep.
3) I can physically keep up with the time and effort demands of ownership.

Other than that I'd rent, stay with family, friends, in a hotel, cabin or worst case scenario, a tent while I rebuilt. It's a tough decision for my wife and I, mostly because of the cost to buy & own a travel trailer. You also need RV insurance and a large, gas hungry truck to pull a travel trailer. The costs don't end there. You have to pay for camping fees at RV sites, propane, storage if you can't keep it at your place, maintenance such as tires, brakes, ect.

We have a limited budget, and when you add those costs together you're talking anywhere from $20,000- $100,000 or more for the initial purchase + maintenance and operating costs. Think about how many vacations where you just rent a hotel room or cabin your family could take for that much money. My wife and I figured we would have to use the RV at least twice a year, two weeks at a time or more, for it to make financial sense for us. I just don't know if we would be that into it.
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Old 01-02-2017, 02:18 PM
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Originally Posted by DuneElliot View Post
This is my thought too. Most evacuations aren't going to be for end of the world situations...but hurricanes and other weather events. My camper is already my BOB and ready to go. Forest and house fires are the only BO event in my area. An RV is a great solution but I don't think buying one is feasible for BO unless it's something you already use.

RVs aren't made to be lived in, but that doesn't mean they can't be...thousands of people do it, and do it successfully. I'll be one of them in 9 months.
Exactly.
If things go Mad Max everybody is in deep doodoo. But even in a semi long term shtf, even a truck camper would make the difference. i'm not going to a fema refugee center or the superdome, that's not an option and that's why people prep.
You may be cramped, and when things get better you might not want to ever get back in it, but it'll provide a place for your family to lay down
Old 01-02-2017, 02:19 PM
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There are a lot of potential situations that an RV could be very handy to have that are not total mayhem, the zombie apocolypse and a worldwide emp event rolled into one.

Many crisis situations happen much closer to home while basic rule of law and at least some human decency is still alive.
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