snowy climate prep advice for a desert rat - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Disaster Preparedness General Discussion Anything Disaster Preparedness or Survival Related

Advertise Here
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-29-2016, 12:30 PM
FrakkingToaster's Avatar
FrakkingToaster FrakkingToaster is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 273
Thanks: 254
Thanked 498 Times in 161 Posts
Default snowy climate prep advice for a desert rat



Advertise Here

In a few months, my job is moving north to somewhere with a snowier climate (and I'm going with it). Now, I was born and raised and continue to live my life in the American southwest desert climate, which means I'm going to need to start preparing (from scratch) for cold-weather situations I've so far neglected simply because they didn't apply to me.

I will be buying more propane-powered lighting/heating items for blizzard and/or power outage situations, obviously things like heavy coats, thermal underwear, extra wool blankets and such, modified car kits for snowy situations, etc...but what other advice (or checklists, supply lists, etc) can you guys offer someone new to colder climates?

Thanks in advance.
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to FrakkingToaster For This Useful Post:
Old 09-29-2016, 12:35 PM
Carne Frio's Avatar
Carne Frio Carne Frio is offline
Survivor, so far
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Way Up North, Near Fairbanks
Age: 71
Posts: 14,462
Thanks: 31,590
Thanked 89,363 Times in 13,422 Posts
Default

Socks with a high percentage or Merino wool content are invaluable in cold weather.
Cotton clothing, which is preferred in warm climates can be dangerous when your very cold.

Get your gear after you get there and find out what the locals are using.
__________________
The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to Carne Frio For This Useful Post:
Old 09-29-2016, 12:38 PM
swamppapa swamppapa is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: N. central Ok.
Posts: 7,157
Thanks: 1,574
Thanked 10,463 Times in 4,291 Posts
Default

Not a lot of snow here but it can get cold -20 overnight
Heavy Merino wool socks and sorrel pac boots with the felt liners that can be removed to dry, An additional set of liners one in one drying.
The first winter will seem the coldest.
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to swamppapa For This Useful Post:
Old 09-29-2016, 12:54 PM
CORangefinder's Avatar
CORangefinder CORangefinder is offline
Master Rationalizer
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Colorado Rocky Mountains
Posts: 1,284
Thanks: 757
Thanked 3,223 Times in 903 Posts
Default

Aside from the obvious, one item that rotates into my GHB through the winter months is a pair of snowshoes. They don't have to be expensive, just effective. If things crack loose during the winter, cross country travel can be a death sentence without them.
The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to CORangefinder For This Useful Post:
Old 09-29-2016, 04:46 PM
Hick Industries's Avatar
Hick Industries Hick Industries is online now
Live Secret, Live Happy
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Eastern Oklahoma
Posts: 10,352
Thanks: 10,876
Thanked 19,649 Times in 6,379 Posts
Default

Vehicle; tires, coolant fluid, battery, vehicle BoB.
Clothing; warm boots, Polly pro long johns, parka, coveralls.

The worst case in some areas is to become snowbound and unable to travel.
A vehicle BoB is designed to support you for two weeks in a snow bank.
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Hick Industries For This Useful Post:
Old 09-29-2016, 08:56 PM
ForestBeekeeper's Avatar
ForestBeekeeper ForestBeekeeper is offline
off-grid organic farmer
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: forests of Maine
Posts: 20,866
Thanks: 25,004
Thanked 30,817 Times in 12,327 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Helpful Post 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Here in Maine we normally see a bit of snow and -20F temps. Our power grid goes out fairly often.

I do not own a 'heavy' coat. I have thermal underwear though I have not put them on for years. Wool blankets are good.

I have a bunch of heavy wool shirts and pants. A wool watch cap. Wool gloves with leather gauntlets. I wear a long rain jacket for when it rains. Rain usually means it is fairly warm though.

I have a very durable jacket that cuts the wind, like firehose kind of heavy, with a liner.

I have a huge collection of wool sweaters, though I do not wear any of them.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to ForestBeekeeper For This Useful Post:
Old 09-29-2016, 09:04 PM
HeavyHauler's Avatar
HeavyHauler HeavyHauler is offline
King of Canada
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Northern Manitoba
Age: 27
Posts: 2,226
Thanks: 15,275
Thanked 5,387 Times in 1,648 Posts
Default

Do you know what kind of cold you'll be facing? A wet cold, is much different than a dry cold.

Here where I am, it gets down to -55c; it's generally a dry cold though.
The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to HeavyHauler For This Useful Post:
Old 09-29-2016, 10:06 PM
Kalashnikov47's Avatar
Kalashnikov47 Kalashnikov47 is offline
Unrepentant Deplorable
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: US-Deep South
Age: 56
Posts: 4,347
Thanks: 583
Thanked 11,008 Times in 3,187 Posts
Default

I'm in FL, but if I were moving to someplace cold and snowy I'd make sure the vehicle(s) were prepped for the region, snow tires, etc...
The Following User Says Thank You to Kalashnikov47 For This Useful Post:
Old 09-30-2016, 12:59 AM
Old fart's Avatar
Old fart Old fart is offline
Isaiah 41:10, Acts 5:29
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 2,120
Thanks: 7,482
Thanked 3,472 Times in 1,421 Posts
Default

+1 on waiting for most purchases until you get there and find out what the locals use and wear. Example: Winter jackets for sale in ND are very different from those for sale in AL. You can't get an Icebox Igloo tool in AL except by mail order, but they're available in some of the stores in northern MN and Manitoba. Merino wool sox are common in ND, MN, and Manitoba, but not in AL.

Here is a past discussion of winter clothing http://www.survivalistboards.com/sho...php?p=11362753

Here is a past general discussion about snow and winter http://www.survivalistboards.com/sho...d.php?t=401410

Since it is a work move, maybe there is someone already there that can provide you with specific advice about what to get and where to get it...

You need to learn a lot of new skills. There are several Army field manuals that have good info.

The first winter skill you will probably need is driving. Drive gently, leave lots of space between you and the vehicle in front of you, don't panic and slam on the brakes, don't drive too fast or too slow (you have to have enough forward momentum so you don't slide off the road or get stuck), don't slow/stop on the way up a hill, and learn how to steer out of a skid. Patience is a virtue during winter driving, but don't obstruct traffic because you'll cause an accident. If traffic and road conditions are beyond your skills, mass transit is a good alternative until you become proficient/good. Practice in an empty snowy/icy parking lot. Remember a lot of drivers are idiots in the snow and ice This includes too-slow and too-fast drivers. 4-wheeel drive means you can go, but it doesn't mean you can stop. Rear wheel drive means you can still steer if you are skidding... the same cannot be said for front wheel drive. If you have a pick-up or rear wheel drive vehicle, put some weight in the trunk/bed over the rear axle to help with traction (I use bags of plain kitty litter or sand... also good in case you or someone else gets stuck)

Antarctica manual (good info even though lots of stuff you'll never use, but cool (pun intended) reading) https://www.usap.gov/travelAndDeploy...ieldManual.pdf

Try to move there in the late spring or early summer, so you can get set up and ready before any winter temps or precipitation happens, and so it's over before you get there. Moving in the snow/ice/cold truly sucks, even if you are well prepared and have lots of experience (trust me on this).

Snow, ice, cold, and no power are pretty, fun, a money-making opportunity, and inconvenient all at the same time, but can be deadly if you're not prepared.

The real winter SHTF is snow melting and flooding. The Red River is a great example of what happens Choose your new home carefully and wisely.
The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to Old fart For This Useful Post:
Old 09-30-2016, 11:41 AM
Unique's Avatar
Unique Unique is offline
quietly gathering
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Northeast US
Posts: 3,330
Thanks: 31,345
Thanked 13,355 Times in 3,098 Posts
Default

^^^^that's a lot of good advice.

DO NOT be one of those people that thinks they can drive in the snow and really can't. It takes practice...and every year people that live up here have tons of accidents with the first snowfall. Mostly because they're trying to go too fast.

Until you have some experience don't play with snow drifts across the road. It can be fun and very tempting...but without experience they'll suck you into the ditch! Give yourself extra time for travel. Where I am it's not uncommon to drive with 6-8 inches of snow on the road...don't get lured in by the people trying to go fast. They're the people you'll see in the ditch a mile down the road.

I live in an area that gets a lot of snow, lake effect, and does get pretty cold. The most important things are to cover your head/ears, keep your feet dry, and keep your hands warm. You have to figure out what works for you to do these things. Until you get used to the weather you might be a little colder than someone more accustomed to the cold.

There's no reason to go to extremes...snow tires are helpful, but not a necessity. Just make sure you have good tires on your vehicle. Have a good battery in your car, a blanket, scraper, snow brush, kitty litter/sand, and a shovel. Let your car warm up fully before taking off...if you've ever experienced a frozen gas pedal, you know why
The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Unique For This Useful Post:
Old 09-30-2016, 12:13 PM
sarco2000's Avatar
sarco2000 sarco2000 is online now
If I had a voice I'd sing
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Beyond the Grid, in Montana
Age: 50
Posts: 3,761
Thanks: 6,848
Thanked 11,141 Times in 2,758 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unique View Post
...I live in an area that gets a lot of snow, lake effect, and does get pretty cold. ...
I grew up in that same area, and I bet I could nail your position within a hundred miles!

It wasn't uncommon to get 2 feet of snow over a couple days when I was a kid!

.
The Following User Says Thank You to sarco2000 For This Useful Post:
Old 09-30-2016, 12:21 PM
ForestBeekeeper's Avatar
ForestBeekeeper ForestBeekeeper is offline
off-grid organic farmer
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: forests of Maine
Posts: 20,866
Thanks: 25,004
Thanked 30,817 Times in 12,327 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Helpful Post 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sarco2000 View Post
I grew up in that same area, and I bet I could nail your position within a hundred miles!

It wasn't uncommon to get 2 feet of snow over a couple days when I was a kid!

.
The snow-belt region East of the Great Lakes, gets huge dumps of snow and rain. This region is basically "Grand Rapids-Detroit-Cleveland-Toronto-Buffalo-Rochester-Syracuse-Ithaca-Scranton-Albany-NYC-New Haven-Hartford-Springfield-Worcester-Providence-Manchester-Boston".

Inside the snow belt they get over-night snow dumped on them, that will be multiple feet of snow in a single storm.
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to ForestBeekeeper For This Useful Post:
Old 09-30-2016, 12:23 PM
CORangefinder's Avatar
CORangefinder CORangefinder is offline
Master Rationalizer
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Colorado Rocky Mountains
Posts: 1,284
Thanks: 757
Thanked 3,223 Times in 903 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unique View Post
^^^^that's a lot of good advice.

DO NOT be one of those people that thinks they can drive in the snow and really can't. It takes practice...and every year people that live up here have tons of accidents with the first snowfall. Mostly because they're trying to go too fast.

Until you have some experience don't play with snow drifts across the road. It can be fun and very tempting...but without experience they'll suck you into the ditch! Give yourself extra time for travel. Where I am it's not uncommon to drive with 6-8 inches of snow on the road...don't get lured in by the people trying to go fast. They're the people you'll see in the ditch a mile down the road.

I live in an area that gets a lot of snow, lake effect, and does get pretty cold. The most important things are to cover your head/ears, keep your feet dry, and keep your hands warm. You have to figure out what works for you to do these things. Until you get used to the weather you might be a little colder than someone more accustomed to the cold.

There's no reason to go to extremes...snow tires are helpful, but not a necessity. Just make sure you have good tires on your vehicle. Have a good battery in your car, a blanket, scraper, snow brush, kitty litter/sand, and a shovel. Let your car warm up fully before taking off...if you've ever experienced a frozen gas pedal, you know why
This is a HUGE one that you need to pay attention to and understand. As stated in this and several other responses, driving on snow and ice is a completely different animal. Having a big 4x4 with aggressive tires does not make up for lack of driving experience. Where I live now, we get mobbed by southern out of staters for skiing and snowmobiling. We also see a ton of big, expensive trucks buried in the ditch or upside down through a fence because they don't understand 4-wheel drive doesn't mean 4-wheel turn or stop.

I grew up in Montana and learned to drive in that kind of winter. When I resettled to civilian life, I was in the desert. I bought a nice, efficient 2WD pickup. Then I came back to the mountains 10 years ago. My truck was reliable and paid for, and I'm still driving it and get around quite well all winter. It's not what you drive nearly as much as how you drive it that counts.
The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to CORangefinder For This Useful Post:
Old 09-30-2016, 12:39 PM
DuneElliot's Avatar
DuneElliot DuneElliot is offline
Outlander Territory
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Wyoming
Age: 37
Posts: 3,329
Thanks: 3,425
Thanked 5,603 Times in 2,198 Posts
Default

Some of it depends on which part of the north you are talking about, but some of the basics are the same:

Generator if you can afford one. Mine is dual fuel to run on my propane tank or gasoline.

MyBuddy (or similar) indoor propane heater (don't leave it on while sleeping), or install a wood/propane fireplace (as long as you have an external propane tank)

I like kerosene lamps...they are safe indoors. Propane-powered camp lanterns are not.

A way to store water inside. I use Aquatainers to store about 50 gallons of drinking water inside, plus kitty litter containers full for flushing the toilet.

In your vehicle keep a snow shovel and sand or mats for traction plus a decent tow strap, a sub-freezing sleeping bag and a blanket or two. A couple of candles can help keep the interior of a vehicle above freezing. A good pair of winter boots and socks, and winter bibs and a coat if you are not already wearing them. An ice-scraper and snow brush. Others have mentioned prepping the vehicle and driving skills already.

When it comes to clothes, as others have mentioned, wait to buy winter clothes until you get there. But as someone coming from the south, a good pair of winter-weight Carhartt bibs and a down-filled winter parka will do wonders. Ski gloves are a savior. Insulated boots and good merino socks are definitely important.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to DuneElliot For This Useful Post:
Old 09-30-2016, 03:01 PM
Special K Special K is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 385
Thanks: 119
Thanked 409 Times in 182 Posts
Default

Some things I didn't see or may have missed from above:

Jumper cables, or even better a jumper box

Keep the gas tank as full as possible. You never know when there will be an accident that closes a road and you need to idle for a few hours to stay warm.

Lots of candles in case you break down you can stay warm. (and a lighter to light them) You may be able to use aluminum pop cans and your vehicle's cup holders to hold the candles.

Foil, emergency blankets or a couple of sun reflectors you can use to reflect heat back at you.

Instant coffee, tea or hot chocolate packets. You can use the candles to heat water.

Some type of metal cup to heat water

Tire chains

A presto log or two

Sunglasses to help prevent snow blindness
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Special K For This Useful Post:
Old 09-30-2016, 05:16 PM
sarco2000's Avatar
sarco2000 sarco2000 is online now
If I had a voice I'd sing
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Beyond the Grid, in Montana
Age: 50
Posts: 3,761
Thanks: 6,848
Thanked 11,141 Times in 2,758 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CORangefinder View Post
...We also see a ton of big, expensive trucks buried in the ditch or upside down through a fence because they don't understand 4-wheel drive doesn't mean 4-wheel turn or stop....

How true! It's because people don't realize that 4WD doesn't help you slow down or STOP on the ice or snow, LOL Usually. Once after a freezing rain I had to put it into reverse to prevent sliding down the hill to crash into my own gate. Even in reverse with 4WD I was still slowly going forward down hill. Stopped a couple feet from the gate.

4WD might get you up a hill (so will a 2WD and chains) but it won't keep you from going off the side of the road, or into the car in front of you, or straight through that stop sign intersection at the T-crossing and into the ditch.


.
The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to sarco2000 For This Useful Post:
Old 09-30-2016, 05:41 PM
DuneElliot's Avatar
DuneElliot DuneElliot is offline
Outlander Territory
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Wyoming
Age: 37
Posts: 3,329
Thanks: 3,425
Thanked 5,603 Times in 2,198 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sarco2000 View Post
How true! It's because people don't realize that 4WD doesn't help you slow down or STOP on the ice or snow, LOL Usually. Once after a freezing rain I had to put it into reverse to prevent sliding down the hill to crash into my own gate. Even in reverse with 4WD I was still slowly going forward down hill. Stopped a couple feet from the gate.

4WD might get you up a hill (so will a 2WD and chains) but it won't keep you from going off the side of the road, or into the car in front of you, or straight through that stop sign intersection at the T-crossing and into the ditch.


.
Well said...it's called "four wheel DRIVE" not four wheel stop!!!
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to DuneElliot For This Useful Post:
Old 09-30-2016, 06:47 PM
gotjunk gotjunk is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 1,313
Thanks: 1,011
Thanked 2,056 Times in 803 Posts
Default

Everyone gave good advice. I'm only going to suggest good rain gear. Before winter hits it can rain a lot on near freezing temperatures. Being wet and cold is no fun and dangerous.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to gotjunk For This Useful Post:
Old 09-30-2016, 09:36 PM
Pawiscoming's Avatar
Pawiscoming Pawiscoming is offline
Born to prep
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: nc IN.
Age: 53
Posts: 3,267
Thanks: 917
Thanked 3,804 Times in 1,528 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Thread 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Get a truck, even a true 2 wheel drive truck is better then a car.
Regardless if it is a 4x4 or 2 w drive you will need a Limited-slip rear differential https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limited-slip_differential

If it does not have a Limited-slip differential a Lunchbox Locker http://www.offroaders.com/tech/Lunchbox-lockers.htm is not overly expinsive and will make a big deferance on what the truck will drive through.

Tires are very important I see a lot of 4x4s with car tires on them it is like castrating a bull and then butting him out for stude. Tires like the ones in the links will work for snow, https://www.treadwright.com/collections/at-tires https://www.treadwright.com/collections/mt-tires https://www.treadwright.com/collections/studdable-tires https://www.treadwright.com/collecti...ant=5386793795

For larger vehicles such suburbans you can use an aftermarket underdash ac evaporator as an extra heater in the back. In a jeep they put out a lot more heat then the stock heater. Before you leave the sand belt you may want to to hunt the junk yards for a few because they will be hard to find in the snow belt. When I was a kid my dad and his friends had them in their jeeps and if you were not careful where you pointed them they would melt the plastic windows.

Tire chains https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snow_chains are a big help in the land of ice and snow. There are two kinds of tire chains twisted link https://www.walmart.com/ip/46360178?...&wl13=&veh=sem and V bar https://www.amazon.com/Glacier-Chain.../dp/B005PW6LCO, there is also two link and four link http://www.clothiertransmissionandtractionproducts.com/.

When installing snow chains you should jack the tire off the ground, let the air out of the tire, put the chains on the tire as tight as you can get them, reair the tire until the chains are snug and let the tire back on the ground.

Driving in snow is a lot like driving in sand.
The Following User Says Thank You to Pawiscoming For This Useful Post:
Old 09-30-2016, 09:45 PM
ForestBeekeeper's Avatar
ForestBeekeeper ForestBeekeeper is offline
off-grid organic farmer
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: forests of Maine
Posts: 20,866
Thanks: 25,004
Thanked 30,817 Times in 12,327 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Helpful Post 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pawiscoming View Post
Get a truck, even a true 2 wheel drive truck is better then a car.
A pickup truck is 'better' in summer for hauling shyte, maybe. But it is not any better than a car in snow.



Quote:
... Regardless if it is a 4x4 or 2 w drive you will need a Limited-slip rear differential
Rear-Wheel-Drive is horrible on snow or ice.

Front-Wheel-Drive is far superior to RWD.



Quote:
... Tire chains https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snow_chains are a big help in the land of ice and snow.
Only if you need them a few times a year. If you live anywhere the gets four-seasons forget chains.



Quote:
... Driving in snow is a lot like driving in sand.
So what you are saying is that you have never driven in snow?
The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to ForestBeekeeper For This Useful Post:
Reply

Bookmarks



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net