So you want to go live in the woods for a year? - Page 3 - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Advertise Here
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I'm going into the woods if SHTF, and will live off the land. Chrysalis Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 325 08-11-2016 01:15 PM
Ever wonder about them people who wanna live in the woods? Carolina Wilderness Survival, Hiking and Camping Forum 31 03-06-2016 10:54 AM
I want to live in the woods forever. TracyLynn New Member Introduction 36 03-31-2015 11:53 PM
a four year old in the woods... Cool Hand Wilderness Survival, Hiking and Camping Forum 15 10-18-2013 08:25 PM
Live Biblically for a Year Apoc Tek Religious Discussion 15 02-14-2013 10:03 PM
Can you get your gun license if you live in the woods.. TwentyTwelve Firearms General Discussion 38 12-16-2012 09:15 AM
Looking to Live Off Grid 3 year plan questions RedBadger Farming, Gardening & Homesteading 16 06-28-2012 02:42 PM
How long could you live in the woods? Hick Industries Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 62 06-16-2012 02:06 AM
Banker can't live on $350K a year OldWolf General Discussion 61 03-14-2012 09:11 PM
Runner Finds 2-year-old Boy in Michigan Woods IdahoGard'ner General Discussion 13 11-10-2011 08:52 AM

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-05-2011, 11:52 PM
BillM BillM is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: KY
Age: 68
Posts: 351
Thanks: 43
Thanked 585 Times in 208 Posts
Default



Advertise Here

People who say they crave to live on their own in the wild are craving adventure. I am 62 years old and I've had a few adventures in my life. Some were for fun and some were forced on me by circumstance.

This is the thing about adventures when you imagine them you leave out the misery and the cold or heat. you leave out the bugs and biting insects. You leave out the hunger and only imagine the good stuff. If you aren't real carful and you have an adventure, after some years have passed, you will forget about the bad part of adventure and only remember the good stuff. Our mind works that way to protect us from nightmares.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to BillM For This Useful Post:
Old 11-06-2011, 01:35 AM
cocobitzz cocobitzz is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 43
Thanks: 2
Thanked 43 Times in 21 Posts
Default

Twyggy, you're problem is you think you are the only mother****er in the west that knows ****.

You assume that I will never do it? Do you know me? No, so stop putting ****ing words in my mouth. I am 20 years old, what 20 year old has the money to buy a 50 acre chunk of land? I can tell you one thing, if any kids I know had money like that, the last thing they would spend it on is property. I'm not that way, I would love nothing more than to own property in the rockies, and hold me to it when I say I will.

I have a feeling I will probably get booted from this website trying to deal with your ****, and if that happens so be it, but stop making so many assumptions.

The only advantage Richard Proenneke had on me was 40 years to work and save money.
The Following User Says Thank You to cocobitzz For This Useful Post:
Old 11-06-2011, 07:00 AM
Mtnman Mike's Avatar
Mtnman Mike Mtnman Mike is offline
Tested in the Wilderness
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado and Wyoming in the warm months on my BOL
Age: 58
Posts: 5,343
Thanks: 11,399
Thanked 19,795 Times in 4,045 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Thread Outstanding Thread 
Total Awards: 2
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by twyggy View Post
Look, this guys is full of himself, and his posts reflect it, but you know what? He knows everything you want to know about extended wilderness living. If you want to live in the wilderness for any length of time, click on his name, and click on past posts. If you really want to live in the woods by yourself for a while, you won't let his ego detract from the knowledge he has. This is is one of the ones who actually come back, year after year, and have the courtesy to tell the rest of us what he's been through, and what it takes to live in the woods by yourself.

Does this mean everything he types is gospel? Lord no. He's got his faults like the rest of us. But take what you can from him, because he's one of the few that has the multitudes of experience required to accomplish such a feat.

While I may not like him as a person, I have unrelenting respect for his knowledge base.

Thank you, again, Mtnman Mike.
It is good to know how you really feel and what you truly think of me. But IF you were to ever meet me in person I hope you would like me as a person. I know of no one who strongly dislikes me in real life. Or at least anyone who would say so to my face.

I almost thanked your post but it seems like a backhanded compliment. Which means it might at first sound like a compliment but could and probably should really be taken as an insult when considered in its entirety.

In real life I do not brag or have a big ego. I am truly a quiet and many say a very nice guy. Probably too nice since some perceive that as a weakness. Anyway, I really don't like talking about myself. Mainly about the mountains, the outdoors and some of my experiences out there.
And in my 6 pic threads I do tell much especially about my remote mtn survival retreat with sheds and a bunker. And I am sure many, far too many, think I am bragging when I tell about my mtn retreat and bunker. Which is Not my intent, I just like to share and show what is possible to do with little money.

I do Not show any fancy buildings or how I have spend over $100,000 to build a concrete house / bunker or a fancy shipping container etc. Many can do that If they have enough money. Many things can be done If people have enough money. Ask Bill Gates or any rich person about that.

A person who can build and Do what they need and want to do with Little money but a Lot of hard work, especially doing everything by oneself, salvaging materials such as lumber, then That is what impresses me. I would like to see more threads like that.

IF anyone out there is able to live in the wild, the woods, pure wilderness or even some place in the country on little money I would like to see threads about that. If they show pics of it all also then so much the better.

So Twyggy, thanks for saying that I have much knowledge and experience in the wilderness. I do, mainly Colorado and Wyoming wildernesses. I have seen some other areas of the USA, even the Smokies of NC but I like the Rocky Mountains best.

Although I would not say that I know Everything about extended wilderness living as you said in the second sentence of your post.
I concentrate mostly on building a good survival retreat, many can call it a BOL ( bug out location ) but someday I do hope to move up there permanently. It is paying the no good property taxes and getting more supplies and helping my elderly parents that keeps me right now from living up there permanently.

And sorry if some, maybe it is many, think I have a big ego, am full of myself - Whatever. It is not easy for some of us to share about what we do without seeming like we are bragging.

But at the risk of sounding like I am "full of myself" I will keep sharing and making some new pic threads to help others do possibly even better than what I have done and do, especially what I do on my mtn place from June to Nov.

Just one more reason I don't post several times a day, even in the winter when I am on the net the most, for I do hate being accused of having a big ego. Since in real life I am actually shy and a mild mannered reporter for the ..... nevermind.
The Following 16 Users Say Thank You to Mtnman Mike For This Useful Post:
 
Old 11-06-2011, 08:13 AM
twyggy's Avatar
twyggy twyggy is offline
Numquam Succumbe
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: In the Ozarks, AR
Posts: 4,158
Thanks: 4,713
Thanked 5,629 Times in 2,267 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mtnman Mike View Post
It is good to know how you really feel and what you truly think of me. But IF you were to ever meet me in person I hope you would like me as a person. I know of no one who strongly dislikes me in real life. Or at least anyone who would say so to my face.

I almost thanked your post but it seems like a backhanded compliment. Which means it might at first sound like a compliment but could and probably should really be taken as an insult when considered in its entirety.

In real life I do not brag or have a big ego. I am truly a quiet and many say a very nice guy. Probably too nice since some perceive that as a weakness. Anyway, I really don't like talking about myself. Mainly about the mountains, the outdoors and some of my experiences out there.
And in my 6 pic threads I do tell much especially about my remote mtn survival retreat with sheds and a bunker. And I am sure many, far too many, think I am bragging when I tell about my mtn retreat and bunker. Which is Not my intent, I just like to share and show what is possible to do with little money.

I do Not show any fancy buildings or how I have spend over $100,000 to build a concrete house / bunker or a fancy shipping container etc. Many can do that If they have enough money. Many things can be done If people have enough money. Ask Bill Gates or any rich person about that.

A person who can build and Do what they need and want to do with Little money but a Lot of hard work, especially doing everything by oneself, salvaging materials such as lumber, then That is what impresses me. I would like to see more threads like that.

IF anyone out there is able to live in the wild, the woods, pure wilderness or even some place in the country on little money I would like to see threads about that. If they show pics of it all also then so much the better.

So Twyggy, thanks for saying that I have much knowledge and experience in the wilderness. I do, mainly Colorado and Wyoming wildernesses. I have seen some other areas of the USA, even the Smokies of NC but I like the Rocky Mountains best.

Although I would not say that I know Everything about extended wilderness living as you said in the second sentence of your post.
I concentrate mostly on building a good survival retreat, many can call it a BOL ( bug out location ) but someday I do hope to move up there permanently. It is paying the no good property taxes and getting more supplies and helping my elderly parents that keeps me right now from living up there permanently.

And sorry if some, maybe it is many, think I have a big ego, am full of myself - Whatever. It is not easy for some of us to share about what we do without seeming like we are bragging.

But at the risk of sounding like I am "full of myself" I will keep sharing and making some new pic threads to help others do possibly even better than what I have done and do, especially what I do on my mtn place from June to Nov.

Just one more reason I don't post several times a day, even in the winter when I am on the net the most, for I do hate being accused of having a big ego. Since in real life I am actually shy and a mild mannered reporter for the ..... nevermind.
Haha. I'd be full of myself, too, brother. Hell, I'm full of myself now.
Old 11-06-2011, 08:14 AM
twyggy's Avatar
twyggy twyggy is offline
Numquam Succumbe
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: In the Ozarks, AR
Posts: 4,158
Thanks: 4,713
Thanked 5,629 Times in 2,267 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cocobitzz View Post
Twyggy, you're problem is you think you are the only mother****er in the west that knows ****.

You assume that I will never do it? Do you know me? No, so stop putting ****ing words in my mouth. I am 20 years old, what 20 year old has the money to buy a 50 acre chunk of land? I can tell you one thing, if any kids I know had money like that, the last thing they would spend it on is property. I'm not that way, I would love nothing more than to own property in the rockies, and hold me to it when I say I will.

I have a feeling I will probably get booted from this website trying to deal with your ****, and if that happens so be it, but stop making so many assumptions.

The only advantage Richard Proenneke had on me was 40 years to work and save money.
*hugs* *hugs*
Old 11-06-2011, 10:09 AM
Hick Industries's Avatar
Hick Industries Hick Industries is online now
Live Secret, Live Happy
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Eastern Oklahoma
Posts: 10,636
Thanks: 11,335
Thanked 20,638 Times in 6,604 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by desert wanderer View Post
SGT, I had to do this once back in 1995 due to my 4WD breaking down in the middle of the central Nevada wilderness, in the middle of winter. I've posted about it in more detail in other threads.

It was no picnic to say the least! So I must agree with what you just said.

It's no fun when your stomach is telling you constantly that it needs food. The 29 days I spent without seeing another human was also the least of my problems.
There's no teacher better than actually experiencing what others dream about.
I remember an old western movie staring Johnny Cash started out with a few verses,

"it's a devil wind that blows, when there's a hole in your coat.
And December snow is ugly, when your boots have come apart.
And the scenery isn't pretty, when your hungry."
The Following User Says Thank You to Hick Industries For This Useful Post:
Old 11-06-2011, 10:40 AM
ThoughtfulWolf's Avatar
ThoughtfulWolf ThoughtfulWolf is offline
Plants don't run!
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Michigan's U.P.
Posts: 1,977
Thanks: 1,923
Thanked 3,522 Times in 1,060 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by twyggy View Post

Now, could you learn faster than I did? Easily. Like I said, this is a hobby for me, and, as such, I gather gear and experience very slowly. So, it's not impossible, as many on this board make it sound to be, but it is certainly difficult and requires a HUUUUUUUUGE knowledge base -the majority of which can only be put together by experience.

Living in the woods for a year isn't impossible, but it IS difficult because it requires a ****-ton of knowledge. Experience is the best method of tapping into that knowledge! Baby steps!
Twyggy,

Out of all that you've said here, touching on experience is the most important part.

It does not matter how many plants one knows of or what said plants look like UNLESS one is actively going out, identifying, and collecting them. All you gatherers know this; the plants sometimes look far from the picture due to wind sweeping, bugs, unhealthy leafs, etc.

Just because one reads something or has done it once or twice does not mean one truly knows how to do it or is "experienced".

Practice, practice, practice, and then go DO IT in real life. And by that I mean, don't only make a fire when you want to do it and it's a nice day out. I mean: go make a fire in the the rain. Go sleep in your debris shelter when its raining. Go camp in the winter. Practice your skills and use them.

The best metaphor my father gave me for bushcraft when I was little goes something like this (I was a boxer at the time):

"Boy, bushcraft is a bit like boxing. You start off slow and full of vigor but you need to use your protective gear 'cuz you're going to get hit and beat up. But, as you've seen, slowly you get better and need less gear and eventually you even start kicking butt! But even then, bushcraft, like boxing, even when good at it you're still going to get hit."

This speaks a lot of truth to me. Don't give up on the dream of living for a year in the woods, but it does not just happen. You have to practice for a weekend with your gear. Take away some gear and extend the time. Next thing you know, you're doing a week long trip with little gear and then maybe one day, after enough week long trips, enough month long trips, maybe you'll be able to stretch it out to a year. Time, practice, and experience. We are not instantly Ray Mears because we have read all of his books. Practice and get out there!
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to ThoughtfulWolf For This Useful Post:
Old 11-06-2011, 11:02 AM
desert wanderer's Avatar
desert wanderer desert wanderer is offline
Back of beyond!
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: the high country, n. Arizona. Just recently bought a house off the grid, & had solar pwr installed.
Posts: 2,576
Thanks: 3,292
Thanked 4,530 Times in 1,727 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mtnman Mike View Post
It is good to know how you really feel and what you truly think of me. But IF you were to ever meet me in person I hope you would like me as a person. I know of no one who strongly dislikes me in real life. Or at least anyone who would say so to my face.

I almost thanked your post but it seems like a backhanded compliment. Which means it might at first sound like a compliment but could and probably should really be taken as an insult when considered in its entirety.

In real life I do not brag or have a big ego. I am truly a quiet and many say a very nice guy. Probably too nice since some perceive that as a weakness. Anyway, I really don't like talking about myself. Mainly about the mountains, the outdoors and some of my experiences out there.
And in my 6 pic threads I do tell much especially about my remote mtn survival retreat with sheds and a bunker. And I am sure many, far too many, think I am bragging when I tell about my mtn retreat and bunker. Which is Not my intent, I just like to share and show what is possible to do with little money.

I do Not show any fancy buildings or how I have spend over $100,000 to build a concrete house / bunker or a fancy shipping container etc. Many can do that If they have enough money. Many things can be done If people have enough money. Ask Bill Gates or any rich person about that.

A person who can build and Do what they need and want to do with Little money but a Lot of hard work, especially doing everything by oneself, salvaging materials such as lumber, then That is what impresses me. I would like to see more threads like that.

IF anyone out there is able to live in the wild, the woods, pure wilderness or even some place in the country on little money I would like to see threads about that. If they show pics of it all also then so much the better.

So Twyggy, thanks for saying that I have much knowledge and experience in the wilderness. I do, mainly Colorado and Wyoming wildernesses. I have seen some other areas of the USA, even the Smokies of NC but I like the Rocky Mountains best.

Although I would not say that I know Everything about extended wilderness living as you said in the second sentence of your post.
I concentrate mostly on building a good survival retreat, many can call it a BOL ( bug out location ) but someday I do hope to move up there permanently. It is paying the no good property taxes and getting more supplies and helping my elderly parents that keeps me right now from living up there permanently.

And sorry if some, maybe it is many, think I have a big ego, am full of myself - Whatever. It is not easy for some of us to share about what we do without seeming like we are bragging.

But at the risk of sounding like I am "full of myself" I will keep sharing and making some new pic threads to help others do possibly even better than what I have done and do, especially what I do on my mtn place from June to Nov.

Just one more reason I don't post several times a day, even in the winter when I am on the net the most, for I do hate being accused of having a big ego. Since in real life I am actually shy and a mild mannered reporter for the ..... nevermind.
I'm not trying to be patronizing, but I have to say that you are NOT "full of yourself". Actually, I have found you to be a humble and reserved sort of guy.
I'm glad that you're not bothered by this, and, I'm not surprised that you aren't bothered by this, it proves my opinion about you.
Some folks will always dream about getting out into the wilderness for prolonged periods of time, and others like you and I, DO get out there, and do it.

THere's nothing wrong with dreaming, we all do it. And there's nothing wrong with those who can only dream about doing this. As, not everyone can get out there for long periods of time due to family and job constraints.

But like Mark Twain once said; "“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

He was a wise and adventurous man! Keep doing what you do Mike, and keep posting those photos!
The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to desert wanderer For This Useful Post:
Old 11-06-2011, 11:20 AM
kmatjhwy's Avatar
kmatjhwy kmatjhwy is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Jackson Hole, Wyo.
Posts: 59
Thanks: 30
Thanked 131 Times in 40 Posts
Default

Thanks Mtnman Mike for All that you post!

Personally I agree with others that experience is the most important part with one just having to put the dirt time out in the wilds. It is interesting these days when I am personally out in the wilds that I just don't see that many people with espicelly not that many young people these days. When I started out hiking over 30 years ago, remember seeing how many people hiking and camping. Now days how many of the people I do see just seem to be more in their middle age or older years it seems. This is just what have experienced. Again from what I said in an earlier post, this modern day society can be as addicting as sugar it seems. It seems in my opinion, these days how many that go to the woods have to be unbrainwashed from what many are forced to learn in growing up. And to that education that never ends which the wilds offer. There is a good quote from Horace Kephart (1917) that I love which says .... "In the School of the Woods ... there is No Graduation Day".

Now one can book learn all they want but that does not come close to having the experience. For instance take the edible plants in the wilds. First one has to know what they are looking for in the different seasons with many looking indeed somewhat different then what the books show. And how these plants looks before and after it blooms or has the berries. For instance in the high rockies where I go in the Greater Yellowstone country, Yampa is one of the best edible plants. It usually comes up in mid to late summer with lasting into the fall. But have seen stalks of this plant all dried up wayyy after the blooming stage and even in the woods seeing the old the dead stalk after the next spring snows has melted. Then even if one knows the edibles, can one take the wild diet of the wilds. Do you know even if you are able to eat this plant personally or that you will have a physical allergy to the plant. When I personally first started living off of the wild edibles, it was like I hit a brick wall bigtime. I had to get used to the wild tastes withOUT any salt or spices. How much of our food in society is soooo salted and spiced nowdays. And how much has all of us became sooooo used to the diet of the settlements. One really has a mind trip bigtime when one first sets out to live off of the wild diet of the woods in my opinion. I think the Mountain Men of old had a term for this which was 'Pork Eater'. This term they used for any newcomer in the mountains who was used to the diet in the settlements and not the diet of the wilds.

Do agree ThoughfulWolf, "Practice, practice, practice, and then go DO IT in real life".

Again, Just my two cents worth.
The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to kmatjhwy For This Useful Post:
Old 11-06-2011, 11:28 AM
bobzilla bobzilla is offline
I love this forum
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 6,367
Thanks: 21,100
Thanked 8,511 Times in 3,912 Posts
Default

My favorite from the newbies?

"When SHTF,I'll go into the woods and hunt my food"

Gotta love them!
Old 11-06-2011, 11:38 AM
jimbowie1's Avatar
jimbowie1 jimbowie1 is online now
Survivor
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: ashford washington state
Posts: 4,155
Thanks: 10,516
Thanked 9,929 Times in 3,000 Posts
Default

TWYGGY you say your 20 yrs old? and think that you have the skills of RICHARD PROENNEKE. [I DONT THINK SO] He was an old school craftsman Everything he did was with hand tools. even up here in logging country you would be hard pressed to find someone that could hand sharpen a crosscut saw. HE was a wood worker a tin smith a mason a hunter a fly fisherman a canoeist. a cook and self reliant. truely a remarkable man and started this life adventure at age 53. your entitled to your opinion just like im entitled to mine.
The Following User Says Thank You to jimbowie1 For This Useful Post:
Old 11-06-2011, 11:54 AM
Fepony's Avatar
Fepony Fepony is offline
Totally off grid
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: WAY off grid in NM.
Posts: 2,663
Thanks: 3,512
Thanked 6,036 Times in 1,688 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Thread 
Total Awards: 1
Default

I can't get any more off grid than i already am.
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Fepony For This Useful Post:
Old 11-06-2011, 09:24 PM
surfgecko's Avatar
surfgecko surfgecko is offline
Survivalist
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 51
Thanks: 6
Thanked 44 Times in 24 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by catmando View Post
most people today would have to tuffen up a tad or two... it wouldnt be the older people that survive either.. it would be the younger ones who could adapt and were more flexible
I believe the "older ones" are better able to survive than the "younger", it doesn't much resemble a video game. They have become extremely soft, and yes some of the older generation have actually had such experiances in their lives. I for one have had many such experiances, living without everything we have gotten use to, might not be the most fun, but I could infact survive.

It's time to give up the cockyness.
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to surfgecko For This Useful Post:
Old 11-06-2011, 09:35 PM
MeatHunter's Avatar
MeatHunter MeatHunter is offline
Life, Liberty,& Happiness
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: A nation in need of healing
Posts: 1,000
Thanks: 800
Thanked 1,221 Times in 454 Posts
Default

I am not planning to live in the woods for just ****s and giggles, but if needs be I will.

Nobody should think its easy, I do primitive camping just to gain the experience, I hunt for food and the experience, I prep to make it all easier.

When it all boils down, I like being alive, so even though I don't look foward to living in the wild I will be ready when the time comes. Till then its all fun and training.
The Following User Says Thank You to MeatHunter For This Useful Post:
Old 11-06-2011, 09:49 PM
bobzilla bobzilla is offline
I love this forum
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 6,367
Thanks: 21,100
Thanked 8,511 Times in 3,912 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MeatHunter View Post
I am not planning to live in the woods for just ****s and giggles, but if needs be I will.

Nobody should think its easy, I do primitive camping just to gain the experience, I hunt for food and the experience, I prep to make it all easier.

When it all boils down, I like being alive, so even though I don't look foward to living in the wild I will be ready when the time comes. Till then its all fun and training.
I love the outdoors and frequently test my skills,building a fire in the rain and snow,building a debri hut,starting a fire with a bow drill with grapevines for string,etc.

What I enjoy is passing this on to my grandkids.
Old 11-07-2011, 10:09 AM
twyggy's Avatar
twyggy twyggy is offline
Numquam Succumbe
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: In the Ozarks, AR
Posts: 4,158
Thanks: 4,713
Thanked 5,629 Times in 2,267 Posts
Default

http://www.survivalistboards.com/sho...d.php?t=126134
Old 11-07-2011, 10:45 AM
UPpatriot's Avatar
UPpatriot UPpatriot is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: In da U.P. eh
Posts: 268
Thanks: 140
Thanked 323 Times in 137 Posts
Default

Hell no I have no desire to go live in the woods off the land. Half assed did it when I was 25 for a year. Lived in a little shack in the middle of nowhere. There was a lake nearby and I caught a lot of pan fish out of it. Shot a nice buck that fall. Hunted other game and stocked up. I was able to get to town for other supplies if needed so not a real living in the mountains experience but tough non the less. Winter was brutal.

Firewood, I don't think most realize how much work it is to gather enough fire wood to make the winter. I had a chainsaw, but no truck and come February I realized I was going to run out of wood. Try making wood in 4' of snow with snowshoes on and getting it back to camp. Can't imagine without a chainsaw. You learn to live with 50 degree temps in your shack so you don't burn up too much wood. It's lonely, and being cold and hungry sux. Add some health issues and it really gets ugly. Naw, not looking forward to it, I'm prepared, older and wiser now but really have no desire. That's the last resort imo.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to UPpatriot For This Useful Post:
Old 11-07-2011, 12:06 PM
sr30 sr30 is offline
I love this forum
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: NC
Age: 46
Posts: 2,161
Thanks: 3,261
Thanked 2,227 Times in 1,046 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobzilla View Post
My favorite from the newbies?

"When SHTF,I'll go into the woods and hunt my food"

Gotta love them!

My neighbor says the same thing, which is really disappointing because I want him in my group for his handy-man skills. This guy can fix anything.

I just tell him, you and every other guy with a gun within 200 miles.
Old 11-07-2011, 03:48 PM
JackMark JackMark is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 20
Thanks: 3
Thanked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Default

It is quite different living. I have listen about off the grid living. But this is too strange also difficult. Is there any kind of benefit of this living style?
Old 11-08-2011, 12:22 AM
Mtnman Mike's Avatar
Mtnman Mike Mtnman Mike is offline
Tested in the Wilderness
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado and Wyoming in the warm months on my BOL
Age: 58
Posts: 5,343
Thanks: 11,399
Thanked 19,795 Times in 4,045 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Thread Outstanding Thread 
Total Awards: 2
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JackMark View Post
It is quite different living. I have listen about off the grid living. But this is too strange also difficult. Is there any kind of benefit of this living style?
Off grid living and wilderness living is very different from modern suciety and city life.

A few benefits of this "strange" life style are living Free, more free than I have ever felt in any city or town.
Once a person has their land paid for, is out of debt and has his homestead / retreat set up then you can live on very little money.
The property taxes are my biggest "necessary" expense which I think they are too much but I am sure $210 a year is cheap to most. I suppose it is cheap rent / protection money paid to the government, so they cannot steal your land if you don't pay the taxes.

But there are Many benefits in a wilderness / off grid life. Others can give more but being self-sufficient is one of the major benefits. I cannot think of anyone who has more freedom if they do own their own land, cabin, etc. and is self-sufficient!

Also any problems in cities such as pollution, overcrowding, noise, money gobbling activities etc. etc. are usually non-existent in the wilderness and many non-city areas.
So If any do wish to live in wilderness or at least away from cities then at least try it. It is a great deal of work, takes much preparation and people better know what they are doing but the benefits far outweigh the few difficulties.
The Following User Says Thank You to Mtnman Mike For This Useful Post:
Reply

Bookmarks



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:26 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net