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Old 11-05-2011, 03:03 AM
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Good Job Twyggy, I tend to avoid those threads these days too much fantasy

Can we get a mod to sticky this?
Old 11-05-2011, 08:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Straza View Post
What is in between a city and the wilderness? I wanna go there!!
This is a good and badly needed thread in this wilderness section.

And to answer Straza's question is that something between a city and a wilderness is a small town which there are still quite a few of those all across this vast land still called America, supposedly the land of the brave and Free.
I wonder If people really know what true freedom is - the wilderness can give a strong taste of freedom that most could not handle. They just would not know what to do and would get bored quickly without tv, computers, Wal~mart and so many entertaining money sucking activities which cities are filled with.
I do not really like small towns since there are way too many nosy people although it can be good to know neighbors.

Besides small towns there are homesteads, farms and even acreages and cabin sites. A few, seemingly very few even have remote survival retreats. Maybe look at a sticky at the top of this wilderness section with the words wilderness survival retreat in it.

And about living in the woods or wild for a year is that people should First try to live in the wild, even some kind of woods just outside of a city, for a few days. Even try to camp without taking a heavy backpack.

Just take a basic survival kit, there are enough of those shown on this board. If you can make it a couple days and not get cold, hungry or thirsty then you might make it for a couple weeks. IF you like living in the woods for a couple weeks without conveniences then you might make it a couple months.
IF you still like living in the woods / wild for a couple months you might make it for a year or even many years IF you are a very unique person who surely loves the wild but still respects it.

It will take Much preparing, learning and determination to be able to live in the wild for a year. Even if you have some conveniences like a tent, good warm sleeping bag, water filters, gear etc.

I know of no one who has camped in and near the wild as much as I have done for the past 20 plus years.
Look at the links in my visitors page profile if you need more proof of that.

People will have to be able to handle being alone and doing almost everything alone. You might have some neighbors half a mile or even a couple miles away, which can be good if you need help or even to talk to someone once in a while.

I also wished to just "go into the wild" and live for a year or more about 30 years ago. Fortunately I used some common sense, found some remote land, bought it - for only $8,000 in 1987 and have loved living in a remote wild mountain area at least from June to late Oct. or Nov. every year since 1999.

Hope all can do that IF they truly wish to live away from cities and all the problems there are. Although there are problems / challenges living in the wild also. Depends on what kind of problems people wish to struggle with. I choose a simple, country life - much Freedom and the opposite of cities in about every way.
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Old 11-05-2011, 08:45 AM
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C'mon guys, how tough would it be?

You've got your edible plants field guide with lovely pen and ink line drawings, your bushcraft survival book, your machete, knife, tinder pouch and firestarter, the high priced boots on your feet, higher priced name-brand clothes, sleeping bag, tarp, water purification gear, water bottle, cook kit and stove, tarp, FAK with book, vitamins and minerals, trail food, led light sources and crank up battery charger.

With all that, and your finely-honed sense of the best place to set up your permanent shelter: from movies, YouTube, fine sites like this one, and your life experiences commuting to work and taking care of your lawn and garden, cooking pre-packaged meat on your Weber. Your success is assured.
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Old 11-05-2011, 09:11 AM
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mmm.. cant live in the city.... cant live in the mountains......cant live in the jungles...
geez wonder how our forefathers made then?

most people today would have to tuffen up a tad or two... it wouldnt be the older people that survive either.. it would be the younger ones who could adapt and were more flexible
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Old 11-05-2011, 09:45 AM
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Originally Posted by catmando View Post
mmm.. cant live in the city.... cant live in the mountains......cant live in the jungles...
geez wonder how our forefathers made then?
Haha, you bring up an all too important point. Is living in the woods for a year difficult? LOL HELL YES.

...But that certainly doesn't make it impossible. So, even though a lot of us are real sarcastic to those who inquire, I think it's important that you guys who want to live in the woods for a year hear from one of us sarcastic guys that it is certainly possible.

Let me put it this way, though. I've been "training" to living in the woods for a year as a hobby for the better part of a decade. My longest retreat was two weeks with five pounds of food, and I was hungry the entire time, lol.

Now, could you learn faster than I did? Easily. Like I said, this is a hobby for me, and, as such, I gather gear and experience very slowly. So, it's not impossible, as many on this board make it sound to be, but it is certainly difficult and requires a HUUUUUUUUGE knowledge base -the majority of which can only be put together by experience.

Go look at my post history. I used to make posts asking all KINDS of crazy questions. I don't really ask any questions anymore, because I hit the limit of what I can learn and research online. Now I go camping for a weekend, a night, or even just go practice setting up my shelter and just taking a nap.

So, that's my best general advice, I think, for those of you who, like me, want to go live in the woods for a year:

Living in the woods for a year isn't impossible, but it IS difficult because it requires a ****-ton of knowledge. Experience is the best method of tapping into that knowledge! Baby steps!
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Old 11-05-2011, 09:52 AM
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At my age, I not only enjoy solitude I crave it.
BUT all these folks are correct. You'll die! You'll never make it. Don't even think of comming up here.
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Old 11-05-2011, 10:53 AM
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Good Thread which I see alot of people wonder about but I guess in todays world, somehow they never much really get to doing. I myself have been going into the wilds and living for over 30 years in the Rocky Mountain West. Personally instead of going all year, usually go from early spring to late fall wandering in the wilds in Northwest Wyoming. And during this time, only a couple of times back in town for a brief resupply or such. Then back in town for the winter where I work someplace to get just a little money to live. It has been a wonderful life but with such a life there is always some sacrifices that many in today's world do not want to take it seems. One doesn't get rich in spending a life wandering and living in the wilds in this modern day world.

Personally in what I have experienced, the hardest part in going into the wilds to wander and live in my opinion is the beginning. I call it a period where one has to face bigtime one's fears. It seems to me that this society we live in can be just as addicting as sugar. And in today's world, am seeing far fewer and fewer people who really want to cut those ties to this modern day society so to speak. Now many might talk of such but when one really gets deep in the wilds then how few people one really sees. How many are just as attached to society as some newborn infant to their mother by some umbilical cord which they absolutely refuse to cut in anyway. If one really wants to go into the wilds for a good long period then they will have to cut the cord to society in my opinion. It is a very romantic notion in fleeing to the wilds and live. But if one is unaccuscomed to such, then in my opinion, it will be like hitting your head against a brick wall. The toughest times are seemingly at the beginning in what I have faced and experienced. One has to be in the wilds for a good long time until one gets accustomed to it all where only after a good long awhile it feels like 'Home'. This is one thing of going and living in the wilds they just don't teach in schools. What they teach is how to be a good indentured servent to the corporations. The biggest thing that I have learned, that one will face is Pyschological. One might know all the physical wilderness survival skills backwards and forwards. But it is the mindset of a person that is the most important when going to live in the wilds. And for those that are just starting out, just take it a step at a time I usually say. And then push your limits. If you are used to only a week then push for two weeks for instance. And after a good long awhile, for you also then heading to the wilds will be heading 'Home'.

Now have been there personally and just my two cents worth.
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Old 11-05-2011, 11:19 AM
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I spend a lot of time in the mountains, due to my 'job' as a prospector. One thing I notice is that after about 10-14 days without seeing or talking to another person (when I finally see one) I've forgotten how to do it. Words rush out in gobs, and they look at me like I'm a bit 'touched'. That's the toughest part of being out there for me. We are, after all, sociable beings.
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Old 11-05-2011, 12:34 PM
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I live here in Wyoming and kmatjhy is correct. You just have to be uot there for awhile to really adapt. Like you kmatjhy I sacrificed getting rich to spend my time in the wilds. I've taught many wealthy folks intermediate and advanced skiing(lots of it Jackson and at Snowking)only to hear them say at the end of the week "I'd give a million $$$ to be able to ski like you do Norm!"
When my time comes to leave this life I'm not going to look back on the time I spent building and fixing electrical systems. I will no doubt fondly remember the back flips into Corbets and the waist deep powder at Steambost most.
Old 11-05-2011, 01:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twyggy View Post
Haha, you bring up an all too important point. Is living in the woods for a year difficult? LOL HELL YES.

...But that certainly doesn't make it impossible. So, even though a lot of us are real sarcastic to those who inquire, I think it's important that you guys who want to live in the woods for a year hear from one of us sarcastic guys that it is certainly possible.

Let me put it this way, though. I've been "training" to living in the woods for a year as a hobby for the better part of a decade. My longest retreat was two weeks with five pounds of food, and I was hungry the entire time, lol.

Now, could you learn faster than I did? Easily. Like I said, this is a hobby for me, and, as such, I gather gear and experience very slowly. So, it's not impossible, as many on this board make it sound to be, but it is certainly difficult and requires a HUUUUUUUUGE knowledge base -the majority of which can only be put together by experience.

Go look at my post history. I used to make posts asking all KINDS of crazy questions. I don't really ask any questions anymore, because I hit the limit of what I can learn and research online. Now I go camping for a weekend, a night, or even just go practice setting up my shelter and just taking a nap.

So, that's my best general advice, I think, for those of you who, like me, want to go live in the woods for a year:

Living in the woods for a year isn't impossible, but it IS difficult because it requires a ****-ton of knowledge. Experience is the best method of tapping into that knowledge! Baby steps!
Good points Twyggy, experience in the wild is essential if anyone plans on spending a significant time in the wild.
That being said, NOTHING is better than actually having gone through it. That time when I was stranded in the wilds of central Nevada for 29 days, it taught me lots of things good and bad.
Especially about myself.

Your mind can be your best survival tool when out there, and your mind can be your biggest obstacle to survival. Successful survival depends as much on your mindset, as it depends on good outdoor skills.

One mistake in judgement can mean end of game. Mother nature is unforgiving.
Old 11-05-2011, 01:35 PM
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Watch the video ALONE IN THE WILDERNESS Its about RICHARD PROMEBEKE? the video is great the book is even better Its a must see must read if your THINKING ABOUT heading out to live in the mountains. I have lived in my home in the cascade mts of wash state for 30+ years. YOU CANT SURVIVE IN THE MOUNTAINS IN A TENT IN THE WINTER. Here we measure snow in ft not inches. And the temps are singledigits lows teen highs lakes ,ponds ,streams freeze over and you cant find food under 6 ft of snow. BEST OF LUCK TO YOU YOU WILL NEED IT.
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Old 11-05-2011, 02:00 PM
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Originally Posted by jimbowie1 View Post
Watch the video ALONE IN THE WILDERNESS Its about RICHARD PROMEBEKE? the video is great the book is even better Its a must see must read if your THINKING ABOUT heading out to live in the mountains. I have lived in my home in the cascade mts of wash state for 30+ years. YOU CANT SURVIVE IN THE MOUNTAINS IN A TENT IN THE WINTER. Here we measure snow in ft not inches. And the temps are singledigits lows teen highs lakes ,ponds ,streams freeze over and you cant find food under 6 ft of snow. BEST OF LUCK TO YOU YOU WILL NEED IT.
There are trapper houses that are along some trails up in the mountains that look like good places to hold up fort for the winter. Except I have been to the same spot in the winter and the snow line is above the trapper house.

I have a lot of respect for the old homesteaders who first surveyed and lived in these mountains.
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Old 11-05-2011, 02:22 PM
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Originally Posted by jimbowie1 View Post
Watch the video ALONE IN THE WILDERNESS Its about RICHARD PROMEBEKE? the video is great the book is even better Its a must see must read if your THINKING ABOUT heading out to live in the mountains. I have lived in my home in the cascade mts of wash state for 30+ years. YOU CANT SURVIVE IN THE MOUNTAINS IN A TENT IN THE WINTER. Here we measure snow in ft not inches. And the temps are singledigits lows teen highs lakes ,ponds ,streams freeze over and you cant find food under 6 ft of snow. BEST OF LUCK TO YOU YOU WILL NEED IT.
I used to live in Idaho, so I have to say that you're right. That's why LOCATION would be extremely important in winter survival. During my winter survival ordeal in the central Nevada wilderness, I was camped at 7,400 ft., and had to fortify my tent with lots of Aspen poles, with a tarp over them. In essence, I built a wooden frame over and around my tent. Or my tent would have been flattened.

It worked well, but took lots of work keeping it intact! I was there 29 days before someone came along and gave me some help, and we got my 4WD working again.
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Old 11-05-2011, 02:46 PM
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Now I have seen that video of Richard Prombeke. Good Video. Another good couple of books to read are 'Journal Of A Trapper' by Osbourne Russell and 'Mountain Spirit: Sheepeater Indians of Yellowstone' by Lawrence Loendorf, which are both excellent books. The Sheepeater Indians were the only Indians that lived in Yellowstone yearround. They lived in the High Country in the summer and some nearby mountain valley in the winter. Now even in this day and age, it seems as if there is still quite abit of empty and wild land out there with how many people crammed into the cities. I know of places here in NW Wyoming where following the local game laws, could be in the High Country all summer, get my Elk and Deer in the fall, then be in a nearby and wild valley in the winter but am not giving locations. The thing is just how few really WANT to live this way being outside the nice and comfy modern day society.
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Old 11-05-2011, 03:05 PM
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Oh I wonder what sparked the flame behind this thread.


One thing that is very misleading about Richard P's story is most people don't take into consideration he lived in a time where you could get land like that without selling your soul, and that he had people fly in resources to him which I'm sure in the alaskan wilderness is far from cheap.

It took my parents years living in a tipi on free land to save up enough money to build there cabin in CO.

Only in my eutopia or the 1800's could you just stake out land and say,

"Here is where I will build my home, these are the trees I will build it from, and that is the flora and fauna that will support me along the way."

We can't live Jeremiah Johnson... but we can at least get a taste of it.
Old 11-05-2011, 03:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Straza View Post
What is in between a city and the wilderness? I wanna go there!!
Well, we live in a yurt in northern Maine. We have a humanure (sawdust) toilet, we pump our water outside, and heat with only wood.

That's kind of in between... maybe leaning towards the wilderness side of things as I see a moose pass through our yard.

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Old 11-05-2011, 10:24 PM
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mmm.. cant live in the city.... cant live in the mountains......cant live in the jungles...
geez wonder how our forefathers made then?

most people today would have to tuffen up a tad or two... it wouldnt be the older people that survive either.. it would be the younger ones who could adapt and were more flexible
People today can and do live pretty much where ever this wish to, especially if they can afford to buy land where they wish and are able to afford it.

Most seem to prefer cities though, probably because of all of the jobs, which over the past one hundred years jobs such as farming disappeared and most moved to cities.

And most people today, especially in the USA would have to toughen up a great deal. Far too many are over weight, even obese and could not walk a mile on flat land much less any hills or mountains.

And I strongly disagree that "older" people would not survive and that it would be younger ones. Just how old though. I know some who are 75 and they out hike and out work those 30 or 40 years younger.

I am 53 and nobody better say that I could not survive, especially in the wilderness. I know I can because I have. Even though I have not posted much about my primitive survival skills I have done all of that in the past.
The last ten years or so I have concentrated on building a good remote survival retreat with a strong underground bunker.

Any new people who have missed that just look at my profile page or even my homepage.

Also I had two 25 year old guys who joined me on my mtn place in June. They were supposed to camp, work and Live on it helping whenever possible. They did little of that. They did hike quite a bit and I thought they might go backpacking, at least for a few days, into the pure wilderness area that begins a mile south of my land, it borders Colorado and Wyoming along the Continental Divide.
But even though they had some good expensive gear they did not go backpacking. The one guy only camped on my land for 4 whole nights even though he said he wanted to stay from mid June to Sept. He ended up staying much of June and about all of July at the Bighorn Motel in Encampment, Wyoming which is the closest town to my mtn place.

One guy did stay from July 1st to July 30th but did not do too much. He did help me a few days, carrying a few logs, digging a few hours for a couple days and he built one picnic table out of scrap wood I had but since he slept til noon about everyday he missed much such as sunrises, wildlife in the morning and quite a few other experiences...

So plz don't tell me about young people today surviving while "old" people don't. Old people have much experience and quite a few even have good useful knowledge. I have yet to meet a young person who can go more than a couple days without their i-pod or other electronic gadgets.
And who truly love the wilderness and would be able to camp, hike, work and Live without modern conveniences....
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Old 11-05-2011, 10:58 PM
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Originally Posted by cocobitzz View Post
Oh I wonder what sparked the flame behind this thread.


One thing that is very misleading about Richard P's story is most people don't take into consideration he lived in a time where you could get land like that without selling your soul, and that he had people fly in resources to him which I'm sure in the alaskan wilderness is far from cheap.

It took my parents years living in a tipi on free land to save up enough money to build there cabin in CO.

Only in my eutopia or the 1800's could you just stake out land and say,

"Here is where I will build my home, these are the trees I will build it from, and that is the flora and fauna that will support me along the way."

We can't live Jeremiah Johnson... but we can at least get a taste of it.
LOL. There's so much land like that still available today. All you have to do is have the money and the balls to grab it.

That's why you'll never do it, because you think **** P. had some kind of priveledge that you don't have, and because you think that, for some reason, you're not privvy to the knowledge Jeremiah Johnson was, and I'm not talking about exit stage left...

The Ozarks are one of the SMALLEST national forests, and there are still thousands of secluded acres for sale at the cheapest prices. I know because I've walked them looking for that perfect peice of land.

I think that, as was said earlier by a wise poster, most people don't understand how much they value society. The grass is always greener on the other side, until you trample it down.
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Old 11-05-2011, 11:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Mtnman Mike View Post
People today can and do live pretty much where ever this wish to, especially if they can afford to buy land where they wish and are able to afford it.

Most seem to prefer cities though, probably because of all of the jobs, which over the past one hundred years jobs such as farming disappeared and most moved to cities.

And most people today, especially in the USA would have to toughen up a great deal. Far too many are over weight, even obese and could not walk a mile on flat land much less any hills or mountains.

And I strongly disagree that "older" people would not survive and that it would be younger ones. Just how old though. I know some who are 75 and they out hike and out work those 30 or 40 years younger.

I am 53 and nobody better say that I could not survive, especially in the wilderness. I know I can because I have. Even though I have not posted much about my primitive survival skills I have done all of that in the past.
The last ten years or so I have concentrated on building a good remote survival retreat with a strong underground bunker.

Any new people who have missed that just look at my profile page or even my homepage.

Also I had two 25 year old guys who joined me on my mtn place in June. They were supposed to camp, work and Live on it helping whenever possible. They did little of that. They did hike quite a bit and I thought they might go backpacking, at least for a few days, into the pure wilderness area that begins a mile south of my land, it borders Colorado and Wyoming along the Continental Divide.
But even though they had some good expensive gear they did not go backpacking. The one guy only camped on my land for 4 whole nights even though he said he wanted to stay from mid June to Sept. He ended up staying much of June and about all of July at the Bighorn Motel in Encampment, Wyoming which is the closest town to my mtn place.

One guy did stay from July 1st to July 30th but did not do too much. He did help me a few days, carrying a few logs, digging a few hours for a couple days and he built one picnic table out of scrap wood I had but since he slept til noon about everyday he missed much such as sunrises, wildlife in the morning and quite a few other experiences...

So plz don't tell me about young people today surviving while "old" people don't. Old people have much experience and quite a few even have good useful knowledge. I have yet to meet a young person who can go more than a couple days without their i-pod or other electronic gadgets.
And who truly love the wilderness and would be able to camp, hike, work and Live without modern conveniences....
Look, this guys is full of himself, and his posts reflect it, but you know what? He knows everything you want to know about extended wildernes living. If you want to live in the wilderness for any length of time, click on his name, and click on past posts. If you really want to live in the woods by yourself for a while, you won't let his ego detract from the knowledge he has. This is is one of the ones who actually come back, year after year, and have the courtesy to tell the rest of us what he's been through, and what it takes to live in the woods by yourself.

Does this mean everything he types is gospel? Lord no. He's got his faults like the rest of us. But take what you can from him, because he's one of the few that has the multitudes of exprience required to accomplish such a feat.

While I may not like him as a person, I have unrelenting respect for his knowledge base.

Thank you, again, Mtnman Mike.
Old 11-05-2011, 11:19 PM
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joes joes is offline
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