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Old 03-13-2011, 07:27 AM
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About the bow drill. How about using two bound sticks for the base rather than a board with a hole drilled in it? It makes setup so much easier, allows alignment of the spindle, allows good oxygen flow to the embers, and is less prone to slipping. Like this:


About the mud-butt. I'd suggest learning to make a substitute. Get some strong bark and beat the crap (pun...) out of it and let it dry.
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Old 03-14-2011, 04:54 PM
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I've always heard that the palmetto plant which thrives in swampy areas was good for many things.
So what part of the palmetto plant is used and for what purposes?
The leaves make for decent cordage. I have not yet tried with the stalks, but them seem like they may make a decent fire board.

The "palms" of the palmetto would make great shelter structuring.
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Old 03-14-2011, 05:02 PM
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Depends on the species. Some are edible. Saw palmetto for example. Other than that the frawns can be used as roofing or cordage. Saw palmetto has edible parts in the plant and berries. You can weave baskets with it, collect rain and a lot of other things.



When you are talking bush-craft... well you are in or near bushes so there will normally always be leaves. If you are in an area without leaves or water, then you would most likely be in the desert or the arctic. For these environments, I would grab a handfull of snow or sand and rub away.

Other things that have been used in the past are wooden flat spoons (to scrape), frayed rope, skins/fur, sticks (again to scrape), your left hand if there is water to wash, dirt, sand, snow, paper and all sorts of things.
Vic has it down pretty well. Even "reusable" tp, which would be a cloth or old T-shirt...you know...something like that. Wash the strips you have cut up later.

Another thing you have to worry about with leaves is having an allergic reaction. Lamb's ear looks great and fuzzy and soft to use the first time, but a lot of people have an allergic reaction the 2nd or 3rd use and then are itchy or broken out in a rash.

Snow makes for a great TP.

There are special pitcher like vases in Africa used to pour over the butt after defecating. Either the hand or a stick is used to wipe the excess off.

The "art" of pooping in the woods too has a bit to do with it. If you can prevent touching of your buttocks on the way out, you will have a bit more ease in wiping.

If there is nothing else, my all time favorite is sphagnum moss.
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Old 03-14-2011, 05:05 PM
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About the bow drill. How about using two bound sticks for the base rather than a board with a hole drilled in it? It makes setup so much easier, allows alignment of the spindle, allows good oxygen flow to the embers, and is less prone to slipping. Like this:


About the mud-butt. I'd suggest learning to make a substitute. Get some strong bark and beat the crap (pun...) out of it and let it dry.
Your fire board is pretty cool, Hubb. Where does the dust collect?
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Old 03-14-2011, 06:45 PM
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Does Mountain Lions prefeer British or Norwegians for dinner?
Emm probably British.but a change is as good as a rest so the odd Norwegian.
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Old 03-14-2011, 06:51 PM
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This may be a stupid question, but I have always wondered what you are supposed to use to wipe with if you don't have tp. I heard leaves, but what if there aren't any leaves? What if there isn't any water to wash your hands with either? Is mud butt something that is a given in bushcraft?
Spagnum moss,boil it and put it in a bag for future use.
If you can boil it and use it warm even better.
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Old 03-14-2011, 08:42 PM
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When using a real fire-steel and a piece of flint, what part actually breaks off to create the sparks?
Old 03-14-2011, 09:52 PM
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When using a real fire-steel and a piece of flint, what part actually breaks off to create the sparks?
It is the steel that breaks off to create the sparks. The flint cuts off miniscule pieces of iron off the steel. The small pieces of iron oxidizes and creates so much heat that it lights up. This is the same reaction that hand warmers use.
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Old 03-15-2011, 01:56 AM
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Sorry to be-labor the question, but, how do you know a palmetto is a saw palmetto? --And exactly which part is edible --the root? --or what?
Also, how do you identify sphagnum moss? Color?, texture? location? etc.
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Old 03-15-2011, 02:30 AM
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Originally Posted by charlieb View Post
I've always heard that the palmetto plant which thrives in swampy areas was good for many things.
So what part of the palmetto plant is used and for what purposes?
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Old 03-15-2011, 02:46 AM
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Emm probably British.but a change is as good as a rest so the odd Norwegian.
They prefer yuppie mountain bikers and joggers.... like like to om nom on synthetics.
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Old 03-15-2011, 06:00 AM
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Your fire board is pretty cool, Hubb. Where does the dust collect?
I have used this type a few times. When I made it, the ember collected at the crevice between the two fireboard-sticks. Since they are roundish, there is a crevice there and the ember fell straight down. Or you can spread the sticks apart a little and the rest of the ember will fall through. Other option is just to flip it upside down and tap.
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Old 03-15-2011, 09:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlieb View Post
Sorry to be-labor the question, but, how do you know a palmetto is a saw palmetto? --And exactly which part is edible --the root? --or what?
Also, how do you identify sphagnum moss? Color?, texture? location? etc.
Saw palmetto, or Serenoa repens, is a palm tree that grows in the West Indies and along the southeastern coast of the United States.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serenoa

Serenoa repens, commonly known as saw palmetto, is the sole species currently classified in the genus Serenoa. It has been known by a number of synonyms, including Sabal serrulatum, under which name it still often appears in alternative medicine. It is a small palm, normally reaching a height of around 2–4 m (3–6 ft).[2] Its trunk is sprawling, and it grows in clumps or dense thickets in sandy coastal lands or as undergrowth in pine woods or hardwood hammocks.


So what I gather is that pretty much all palmettos are "Saw Palmettos"

Here is a picture of a few I took of them:

Umm....disregard that that one is on fire. lol. But you see how it is clustered like that and even growing upwards a bit like the palm tree does. They can look like mini-palm trees.





The fruits of the saw palmetto are highly enriched with fatty acids and phytosterols, and extracts of the fruits have been the subject of intensive research for the treatment of urinary tract infections. This extract is also commonly used for other medical conditions

The fruits are edible raw. The hard seeds may be ground into flour. The heart of the palm is a nutritious food source at any time. Cut off the top of the tree to obtain the palm heart.


Don't forget all the valuable uses of the leaves too, for hats, baskets, thatching, cordage, etc.


Spgahgnum moss tends to grow in bogs or other places with high acidity. One of the things you will notice with sphagnum moss is that if you ring it, quite a bit of water will come out. The way you can tell sphagnum moss from other moss is due to the way it clusters, it has quite a different branching of stems than other mosses.

Here is a picture of Spgahgnum (no mine )

and


These pictures of sphagnum don't seem to be reproducing, in which case (as with most moss) you will see these little sprouts or "feeler" looking things coming up. You can actually sex the moss but that's a story for another day.

Here is a more typical moss that IS NOT what you're looking for:

and
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Old 03-15-2011, 03:01 PM
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why wouldn't a guy want to use the bottom two types of moss?
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Old 03-16-2011, 05:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vicdotcom View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThoughtfulWolf View Post
Your fire board is pretty cool, Hubb. Where does the dust collect?
I have used this type a few times. When I made it, the ember collected at the crevice between the two fireboard-sticks. Since they are roundish, there is a crevice there and the ember fell straight down. Or you can spread the sticks apart a little and the rest of the ember will fall through. Other option is just to flip it upside down and tap.
I've never used sticks that were perfectly straight, and the dust usually falls in the cracks between the two. This is actually convinent because I can place the tinder directly under it and have the embers fall where I need them to without having to stop as often (which speeds the process).

Oh, and for the record, that is not my pic.
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Old 03-16-2011, 09:11 AM
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I've never used sticks that were perfectly straight, and the dust usually falls in the cracks between the two. This is actually convinent because I can place the tinder directly under it and have the embers fall where I need them to without having to stop as often (which speeds the process).

Oh, and for the record, that is not my pic.
Ah neat I'll try this for sure! Thanks!
Old 03-16-2011, 09:21 AM
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why wouldn't a guy want to use the bottom two types of moss?
The top two pictures of moss are that of sphagnum moss. Sphagnum moss has a low pH (high acidity) and absorbs water really well! You can literally wring water out of it! Due to its pH and absorptive properties, the water SHOULD be safe to drink from live healthy looking sphagnum moss. By healthy looking, that means no mushrooms growing out of it, no rotting looking parts, etc. (I imagine it would be hard to find rotting things in a bog anyways...)

One would not want to use the other mosses in this way because, at least the ones pictured, do not contain the same pH levels and it would be hard to say they were "sterile". While that moss may be good for use as bedding, I wouldn't use that particular moss for baby diapers or bandages as sphagnum moss has been used for.


I believe also, due to some anecdotal evidence and late night discussions with my biologist friends as well as confirmation by Dr. Robertus, one should be able to consume the water from sphagnum moss as well as from the pitcher plant with relatively little concern. There is still the chance of illness, at least with sphagnum, but from my own research and some of what I've heard, it is a quite rare bacteria.
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Old 03-16-2011, 09:36 AM
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My question goes as such: I have heard that if a vine is to contain water, it will be potable, even if it does not taste well. I have read, or heard, too, that even if the vine is poisonous to eat, the water is still good. Is this true? I have not consumed water from a vine because I'm uncertain.

From my buddy STICKS65:

Heres some info I just found on collecting water from vines.

Water can also be obtained from vines. Water producing vines varying in size from pencil thickness up to the thickness of an adult man’s forearm can be found throughout much of the south-eastern United States. When selecting a vine, select those with a larger diameter. The greater the thickness of the vine the more water it is capable of producing. A sharp knife, or better still a machete, will be needed to sever the tough, woody vine. Vines that exude a white latex sap or those that produce a colored or foul smelling sap should be avoided. If no sap is observed, or if the sap that is observed is clear and without aroma, remove a twenty four inch section severing the higher end first and then the lower end. If the lower end is cut first, the water contained within the vine is drawn up by capillary action and far less water will drain out by the time that the upper end is severed. Once removed, the section of vine is held vertically and the water contained within it will drain into a container (perhaps a cupped hand) where it should be further evaluated. Liquid that is colored should not be consumed. Liquid that has an unpleasant aroma, other that a faint “woody” smell, should also be discarded. This water could be used to satisfy any hygiene needs. Taste a small amount of the water. Water that has a disagreeable flavor, other than a slightly “earthy” or “woody” taste, should not be utilized for drinking. Hold a small amount of water in your mouth for a few moments to determine if there is any burning or other disagreeable sensation. If any irritating sensation occurs, the water should be discarded. Ultimately, liquid that looks like water, smells like water and tastes like water, is water and can be safely consumed in large quantities without further purification.

thanks sticks!
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Old 03-17-2011, 02:35 AM
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My bushcraft question is:

...How many calories are there in an average sized crayfish? No, seriously, I can't find consistent information on this ANYWHERE.
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Old 03-17-2011, 04:36 AM
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My bushcraft question is:

...How many calories are there in an average sized crayfish? No, seriously, I can't find consistent information on this ANYWHERE.
http://www.nutrientfacts.com/FoodPag...s_Crayfish.htm

Uncle google is your friend!
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