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Old 01-11-2017, 03:57 PM
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i just finished scraping the 1" of ice on my front sidewalk. Man that stuff sucked.
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Old 01-11-2017, 04:13 PM
InOmaha InOmaha is online now
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No combustibles without exhaust to the outside. Carbon monoxide is more dangerous than the cold when you've got blankets and clothing around.

I should probably mention that I grew up without a heater in Missouri. I wore winter clothes around the house and slept under a feather bed. 30 degree temps don't really scare me.
A smaller enclosure will help keep you warm even without an outside heat source. We went without power for a month when my sister was a newborn. 1982 or 83? My dad installed a small maually operated propane heater that vented outside. It kept the basement above 50 F and it keep the pipes from freezing on the main floor since the basement wasn't finished. There were no pipes on the top floor. They haven't had to use the heater since, but it's there.

In 2007 an ice storm with high winds came through central Nebraska and knocked down 1,200 or so high voltage transmission towers. That took months for them to put back together. http://www.nppd.com/assets/stormreconstruction.pdf My inlaws used a gas fireplace and a generator to get through the 2 weeks they were out. They ran the generator 2-3 hours a day to get the heat on, keep the refrigerators and freezers cold, charge misc. stuff, and take showers. Outside the small town, the power was out longer.

I'm not a fan of ice. We had a little here this week. But our lines are all underground in our area and my neighbors all work for the utility. So the power hasn't been out for more than 1 hour in 15 years.
Old 01-11-2017, 04:42 PM
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I am on the edge of the front. I'm prepared for the worst (past experience) but I hope this time it's short-lived and that I don't loose anymore trees.
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Old 01-11-2017, 04:47 PM
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I was in the ice storm of 2008. We ended up with 11 or 14 days or some such without power. We were trapped for 3 days due to power lines down all over the neighborhood -- one way out.

I was totally unprepared and roughed it out for 6 days before heading to a hotel. Now I'm prepared for a much longer outage.

This picture is taken in front of our house. There were about 30 trees down on our half-mile driveway, with at least 6 of them fairly large. Even getting out of the driveway, we still couldn't go anywhere for a while.

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Old 01-11-2017, 04:54 PM
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A lot of furnaces probably most are 220v 30a devices. For the fuel it takes to run a genset a direct fire burner would be more efficient and safer.

Only if it's electric, in which case you're better off running a couple small space heaters off a genny instead of the central furnace.
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Old 01-11-2017, 05:21 PM
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I just got an alert that we could be in for 1/2" to 1" of ice over the weekend and into Monday. I may have to get myself ready too. Fire up the generator and pick up some more ice melt and dig out the paint pole I use to knock ice off of trees and bushes.

I topped off all the gas cans the other day at the grocercy store using rewards points that gave us gas at $1.23/gallon.
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Old 01-11-2017, 05:59 PM
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Blankets are not enough with a small child (your reference 'since the baby'). We have as a contingency, a Big Buddy propane heater with the 20 lb tank adapter, with a primary and an extra 20 lb tank (uses same ones as the backyard BBQ) and several smaller tanks (1 lb). Purpose is to keep one part of the house warm enough to live in and have liquid water come from the taps by keeping the temp above 50 degrees F. Used properly, CO is not a major concern but use according to the DIRECTIONS. May require some furniture movement and leaving a trickle of water on in other parts of the house if your house is larger.
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Old 01-11-2017, 10:05 PM
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Blankets are not enough with a small child (your reference 'since the baby').
When I was a small child the water bucket would often freeze beside my bed. We had no insulation. We could watch the chickens through holes in the floor as they walked around under the house. We slept on a feather bed, and under that was a straw tick. We had lots of blankets and quilts. Babies in the family slept between their moms and dads when it was extremely cold.
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Old 01-11-2017, 10:25 PM
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Current forecast is saying some spots will get a 1/2" of ice. 1/4" for most spots. I think the biggest problem is the urbanites who will freak the **** out and go sliding all over the place killing themselves and others.
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Old 01-12-2017, 12:25 AM
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I couldn't remember the process to turn on our electric gas fireplace without power. So I tracked that down and tested it. I forgot because it's so simple. Flip the switch even though there's no power. The blower is the part that needs power to run.
Old 01-12-2017, 01:12 AM
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Ice schmice. We've got a few million people here in MN who deal with this crap every year. They range from being highly prepped to being highly pampered and lucky.
Old 01-12-2017, 03:25 AM
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Ice schmice. We've got a few million people here in MN who deal with this crap every year. They range from being highly prepped to being highly pampered and lucky.
Happens every year here too (we probably get more ice than any other state because of the jet stream pattern, though you guys get a LOT more snow), but there's a culture in the cities of basically acting like they've never seen it before when it happens and most of all refusing to prepare or change their daily routines to accommodate it. Every time it happens, it's the last time it will ever happen and there's no reason to ever expect it to happen again so every year we go through this same damn thing where they're all caught by total surprise and we're doing traumas in the general treatment rooms because we don't have enough dedicated bays.
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Old 01-12-2017, 07:59 AM
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Gas at USD 1.23 per gallon, which is rougly 30 c per liter... here in Ukraine it's about 80 c per liter and the local incomes are just 10 or more times less for many people. You are just plain lucky... Running a generator for freezers and lamps here is pretty costly with eg. my small 2 kW beast drinking roughly a liter per hour...

Many people install stoves like these (same design and operating principle, but locally manufactured, which means, that they cost considerably less), and they are extremely fuel-effective.

A neighbour of mine heats his small home made of 17 cm thick SIP-panels (the total area is about 700-800 square feet) and it takes less then 20 pounds of wood per day to maintain the comfortable 22*C inside because the fuel doesn't burn immediately (smoldering mode), so it's worth looking for similar alternatives in the US.
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Old 01-12-2017, 10:24 AM
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It's a bit chilly here at 32*F. Supposed to get a couple degrees warmer, then start falling through the afternoon, with the clouds breaking up a little. Storm warning starts overnight, but the forecast I just looked at doesn't have the ice actually starting until tomorrow afternoon. I just bought 3 forty pound bags of ice melt (hoping that actually gets me through the season). Planning to treat my driveway this afternoon when things dry up a bit. Ground's wet now with some small puddles, don't want to dissolve it all prematurely.
Old 01-12-2017, 12:35 PM
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We've been getting less snow lately, and more mild weather at the beginning and ends of winter than we used to. But I pretty much blame the modern work environment for people (working/middle-class) doing nothing to prepare for it. As for the unemployed, they probably can't prepare for anything at all.

One example you see is businessmen who pretty much try to wear the same thing year-round. It can be hot and humid, or it can be -25 windchill. Same flimsy/breezy dress pants, dress shoes with no traction whatsoever, no serious gloves, no hat. And a century ago it would have been common for storekeepers and other mom&pop's to simply close for the day. But the modern business culture expects everyone to be immune from the elements, and does not honor travel advisories or weather warnings. The office cube may look the same year in and year out, gray, no sound, no natural light, sterile and similar to the coffin we'll eventually be buried in. But traveling in hazardous conditions can make that day come sooner.

We've had -40 windchills and 8" snow storms -- and my employer will still not close for the day.

The message all of this sends is that "Blizzards, severe storm warnings, travel advisories, etc. are a joke. Get back to work."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Colt View Post
Happens every year here too (we probably get more ice than any other state because of the jet stream pattern, though you guys get a LOT more snow), but there's a culture in the cities of basically acting like they've never seen it before when it happens and most of all refusing to prepare or change their daily routines to accommodate it. Every time it happens, it's the last time it will ever happen and there's no reason to ever expect it to happen again so every year we go through this same damn thing where they're all caught by total surprise and we're doing traumas in the general treatment rooms because we don't have enough dedicated bays.
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Old 01-12-2017, 01:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Zhmendos View Post
Gas at USD 1.23 per gallon, which is rougly 30 c per liter... here in Ukraine it's about 80 c per liter and the local incomes are just 10 or more times less for many people. You are just plain lucky... Running a generator for freezers and lamps here is pretty costly with eg. my small 2 kW beast drinking roughly a liter per hour...

Many people install stoves like these (same design and operating principle, but locally manufactured, which means, that they cost considerably less), and they are extremely fuel-effective.

A neighbour of mine heats his small home made of 17 cm thick SIP-panels (the total area is about 700-800 square feet) and it takes less then 20 pounds of wood per day to maintain the comfortable 22*C inside because the fuel doesn't burn immediately (smoldering mode), so it's worth looking for similar alternatives in the US.
Gas here is ~ $2.25/gallon but I got it on sale for $1.23 using a grocery store rewards program. The promotion limits me to 20 gallons so I filled up a car and topped off a couple of gas cans.

$2.25/gallon is still only around $0.56/liter.
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Old 01-12-2017, 01:57 PM
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Gas here is ~ $2.25/gallon but I got it on sale for $1.23 using a grocery store rewards program. The promotion is limited me to 20 gallons so I filled up a car and topped off a couple of gas cans.

$2.25/gallon is still only around $0.56/liter.
I use the same fuel saver program you do. We'll see what Omaha gets. I'll tell you that Rusty Lord is full of crap though.

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Old 01-12-2017, 02:33 PM
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Gonna be another fun drive home tomorrow

Last ice storm, Couple of Weeks ago, It took me 6 hours to drive or wait the 60 mile journey home.

Ill take pics of the Traffic
Old 01-12-2017, 02:46 PM
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Originally Posted by aramchek View Post
We've been getting less snow lately, and more mild weather at the beginning and ends of winter than we used to. But I pretty much blame the modern work environment for people (working/middle-class) doing nothing to prepare for it. As for the unemployed, they probably can't prepare for anything at all.

One example you see is businessmen who pretty much try to wear the same thing year-round. It can be hot and humid, or it can be -25 windchill. Same flimsy/breezy dress pants, dress shoes with no traction whatsoever, no serious gloves, no hat. And a century ago it would have been common for storekeepers and other mom&pop's to simply close for the day. But the modern business culture expects everyone to be immune from the elements, and does not honor travel advisories or weather warnings. The office cube may look the same year in and year out, gray, no sound, no natural light, sterile and similar to the coffin we'll eventually be buried in. But traveling in hazardous conditions can make that day come sooner.

We've had -40 windchills and 8" snow storms -- and my employer will still not close for the day.

The message all of this sends is that "Blizzards, severe storm warnings, travel advisories, etc. are a joke. Get back to work."
We work at a hospital (though I'm out for a couple years staying home with the babe), and they're so aggressive about nothing being an excuse no matter what that they'll punish you if you don't successfully make it in to work no matter how dangerous it is, and sometimes you'll even have the national guard show up at the door to take you in (seriously). Unfortunately my wife's going to have to deal with this this weekend and I'm certainly concerned for her safety.

My answer has always been to make employers legally and financially responsible for the safety of their workers coming or going from work during declared disasters and state of emergencies if they require them to come in. They have to pay for the vehicles and medical bills associated with just 1 wreck and they'll consider changing that policy. When they get charged with reckless endangerment they'll change it immediately.
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Old 01-12-2017, 03:44 PM
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Hospitals are tricky, since there are various regulations, statutes, government agencies, etc. that indicate which jobs that are essential for human safety. Your cops, firefighters, doctors, air traffic controllers EMT's, and so on. I can see why society puts more pressure on people in those professions. And they know what they're getting into.

But most of us work non-essential occupations, and the world won't end if those operations wait a day or two.

I agree on the employer responsibility part, especially for so-called non-essential workers. But it should be more than just covering accidents. There are many areas around the country with an infrastructure that was laid out half a century ago, and no new lanes built since. So all it takes is some really nasty weather -- to not only cause accidents, fatalities, etc. but also force people to spend hours/day in their cars getting to/from work under highly stressful conditions. Joe Sixpacks has no political voice whatsoever today. I don't need a 3,000 mile wall built, or any more wars on terra, but I could use a couple extra driving lanes and failed pavement replaced.

If these pressures had to be borne not just by powerless people, but by big employers, then maybe we'd see change. Making them legally responsible for accidents due to having to drive in severe weather seems to be one way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Colt View Post
We work at a hospital (though I'm out for a couple years staying home with the babe), and they're so aggressive about nothing being an excuse no matter what that they'll punish you if you don't successfully make it in to work no matter how dangerous it is, and sometimes you'll even have the national guard show up at the door to take you in (seriously). Unfortunately my wife's going to have to deal with this this weekend and I'm certainly concerned for her safety.

My answer has always been to make employers legally and financially responsible for the safety of their workers coming or going from work during declared disasters and state of emergencies if they require them to come in. They have to pay for the vehicles and medical bills associated with just 1 wreck and they'll consider changing that policy. When they get charged with reckless endangerment they'll change it immediately.
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