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Old 02-09-2013, 03:42 AM
iwill iwill is offline
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Australia exported 70million tonnes of iron-ore in 2000 and has jumped to 685million tonnes by 2011 and keeps going also around 300million tonnes of coal per year.
I seen a doco on the tectonic plates a while ago and a scientist said that they are like leaves floating on water (molten rock in the plates case) So is moving all this weight around the planet in such a short time speeding up natural movement..also if a litre of water is one kg how much weight in a dam? All this combined weight would surely have an impact wouldnt it?
Any thoughts on this?
Old 02-09-2013, 03:51 AM
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No a chance in #$%^. That is miniscule amount of mass in relation to the earth..........................Been moving for millenia, will be moving LONG after we are gone.
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Old 02-09-2013, 04:17 AM
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No a chance in #$%^. That is miniscule amount of mass in relation to the earth..........................Been moving for millenia, will be moving LONG after we are gone.
Yeah, any effect we have by moving minerals around is like a a grain of sand added to or taken away from a dumptruck load of rock.
 
Old 02-09-2013, 04:47 AM
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woah i was waaay off on that theory your answers just triggered another part of my brain that said to me "hey man WTF were you thinkin"
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Old 02-09-2013, 06:01 AM
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I sincerely doubt anything man can do will actually cause the earth's tectonic plates to move differently.
However, there have been at least one study that large scale projects, specifically China's Three Gorges Dam, may cause unusual deformations in the earth's crust.
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Old 02-09-2013, 06:06 AM
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Y'all better be careful before Australia capsizes, Just ask congressman hank johnson.

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Old 02-09-2013, 06:23 AM
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Y'all better be careful before Australia capsizes, Just ask congressman hank johnson.

3-25-2010_Hank_Johnson_Guam_Tip_Over.wmv - YouTube
Oh stop being silly. He's talking about Guam, not Australia. Clearly you can't capsize Australia with 25,000 servicemen. But I'll bet 10 million Australian kangaroos, all jumping at once, could easily capsize Guam.

You have to be scientific about these things.
Old 02-09-2013, 06:35 AM
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Yeah, any effect we have by moving minerals around is like a a grain of sand added to or taken away from a dumptruck load of rock.
I dunno. Three Gorges Dam has altered our orbit a measurable amount if I recall correctly.

http://www.theenergylibrary.com/node/11435

Alterations can have impacts. Significant impacts? That remains to be seen.

I'm pretty sure that fracking and pumping of waste water into waste wells has lubricated the plates in my area. I never heard of an earthquake in this area until the gas guys came. Now we have 3-4 small tremors a week.
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Old 02-09-2013, 07:36 AM
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I would worry a lot more about God moving them. It says in the Bible "I will curse them that curse thee ( Israel ) and bless them that bless thee. Every time the US has stiffed Israel in the past few years a severe natural disaster has followed sometimes the same day or within a day or two.
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Old 02-10-2013, 07:05 PM
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Originally Posted by iwill View Post
Australia exported 70million tonnes of iron-ore in 2000 and has jumped to 685million tonnes by 2011 and keeps going also around 300million tonnes of coal per year.
I seen a doco on the tectonic plates a while ago and a scientist said that they are like leaves floating on water (molten rock in the plates case) So is moving all this weight around the planet in such a short time speeding up natural movement..also if a litre of water is one kg how much weight in a dam? All this combined weight would surely have an impact wouldnt it?
Any thoughts on this?
Hello, consider the following: the earth's crust on the continent is on average between 30 to 50 km (20 to 30 miles) (much less in oceans). That is the upper-most layer on earth. The plate tectonics rest below those layers and are on average, on the continents about 200 km thick (120 miles). Next consider that the deepest hole ever drilled by humans reaches down to about 12.3 km (7.6 miles). Given the numbers above, can you reasonably expect the accumulation of water by human activity to actually make the plate tectonics move, given they are bewteen 20 to 30 miles deep? In all the reading I have done, the only surface factors that have a potential effect at the tectonic plate level is the super fast melting (by geologic time-frame) of massive amounts of ice around the world. Consider that in Antartica, absolutely huge (nearly mile thick) ice chucks detached from the actual continent and began floating, in the yeaers prior to the massive Indonesian earthquake. A further fact to consider, during the last ice age, the ice was some 2 miles thick over Northern America. This considerable weight actually depressed the continental plates by nearly 1,000 feet. As it melted, again in the blink of an eye in geological time, the plate tectonics spent the following 10,000 + years 'rebounding' (and still are), violently at fisrt and much more subdued later. Case in point, parts of eastern and north-eastern Canada and the US experience numerous small earthquakes (2 or less Richter) each day. However, because they are vertical in nature rather then horizontal, the are much less noticed or damaging. The only concession I see possible to link human activity to plate tectonic movement would be an unfortuante compounding of natural occurances and human ones. But again, I would consider such a scenario as a tiny contribution to natural processes. Cheers. Lui
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Old 02-11-2013, 04:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Lui View Post
Hello, consider the following: the earth's crust on the continent is on average between 30 to 50 km (20 to 30 miles) (much less in oceans). That is the upper-most layer on earth. The plate tectonics rest below those layers and are on average, on the continents about 200 km thick (120 miles). Next consider that the deepest hole ever drilled by humans reaches down to about 12.3 km (7.6 miles). Given the numbers above, can you reasonably expect the accumulation of water by human activity to actually make the plate tectonics move, given they are bewteen 20 to 30 miles deep? In all the reading I have done, the only surface factors that have a potential effect at the tectonic plate level is the super fast melting (by geologic time-frame) of massive amounts of ice around the world. Consider that in Antartica, absolutely huge (nearly mile thick) ice chucks detached from the actual continent and began floating, in the yeaers prior to the massive Indonesian earthquake. A further fact to consider, during the last ice age, the ice was some 2 miles thick over Northern America. This considerable weight actually depressed the continental plates by nearly 1,000 feet. As it melted, again in the blink of an eye in geological time, the plate tectonics spent the following 10,000 + years 'rebounding' (and still are), violently at fisrt and much more subdued later. Case in point, parts of eastern and north-eastern Canada and the US experience numerous small earthquakes (2 or less Richter) each day. However, because they are vertical in nature rather then horizontal, the are much less noticed or damaging. The only concession I see possible to link human activity to plate tectonic movement would be an unfortuante compounding of natural occurances and human ones. But again, I would consider such a scenario as a tiny contribution to natural processes. Cheers. Lui
Yeah i see what you mean lol lucky for me i mentioned it here and not in the lunch room at work cause i mighta got a few bruises..my theory was nothing short of ingnorant
Old 02-11-2013, 03:43 PM
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Yeah i see what you mean lol lucky for me i mentioned it here and not in the lunch room at work cause i mighta got a few bruises..my theory was nothing short of ingnorant
yeah, but your train of thought was correct, just it's magnitude was off. It's like an Olympic ice skater, they pull their arms in close to their body to spin faster. Then let them away to slow the spin.

as we mine things out and use them to build up sky scrapers etc, we are essentially loosening our arms from our body and slowing our spin. However, its more like putting our hands out a bit.

It's not a big extreme slowing, but we are slowing the spin non the less. So many other factors are at play here that it's hard to say if we are actually making a negative effect, no matter how negligible it may be.
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Old 02-11-2013, 06:36 PM
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Man has NO EFFECT whatsoever upon the movement of the techtonic plates.
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Old 02-12-2013, 12:25 PM
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Dang it! I guess I will stop stomping around outside to try and set off the seismometers at Georgia Tech. Figured I was giving the nerds quite a show.
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Old 02-12-2013, 12:27 PM
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no more or less than pumping saline into the crust and breaking up the bedrock... (oh yes... I went there). LOL
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Old 02-12-2013, 12:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iwill View Post
Australia exported 70million tonnes of iron-ore in 2000 and has jumped to 685million tonnes by 2011 and keeps going also around 300million tonnes of coal per year.
I seen a doco on the tectonic plates a while ago and a scientist said that they are like leaves floating on water (molten rock in the plates case) So is moving all this weight around the planet in such a short time speeding up natural movement..also if a litre of water is one kg how much weight in a dam? All this combined weight would surely have an impact wouldnt it?
Any thoughts on this?
No. We aren't making plates move. What we are doing with regards to mining is little more than scraping the surface of the continental plates. continental crust is typically about 20 miles thick. Most mining operations are only scratching the upper several hundred yards, and in very specific locations. You would have to remove quadrillions of tons of material over incredibly large areas to influence the movement of tectonic plates.
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Old 02-12-2013, 05:35 PM
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Dang it! I guess I will stop stomping around outside to try and set off the seismometers at Georgia Tech. Figured I was giving the nerds quite a show.
You were giving SOMEBODY a show!! :D
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Old 02-12-2013, 05:39 PM
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Yeah i see what you mean lol lucky for me i mentioned it here and not in the lunch room at work cause i mighta got a few bruises..my theory was nothing short of ingnorant
Even here you were this >< close to making my India Lima.
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Old 02-12-2013, 06:38 PM
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We would not have any effect on the movement of the plates but its a good out of the box thought!!!
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Old 02-12-2013, 07:45 PM
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Oh stop being silly. He's talking about Guam, not Australia. Clearly you can't capsize Australia with 25,000 servicemen. But I'll bet 10 million Australian kangaroos, all jumping at once, could easily capsize Guam.

You have to be scientific about these things.
WTF!! Oh come on now YOUR being silly.The ony way this theory could possibly work is if you had the larger male roo's so just how the hell do you round up 10mill of em when they are preoccupied molesting hot female tourists?
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