1 year supply per person - Page 2 - Survivalist Forum
Survivalist Forum

Advertise Here

Go Back   Survivalist Forum > >
Articles Classifieds Donations Gallery Groups Links Store Survival Files


Notices

Disaster Preparedness General Discussion Anything Disaster Preparedness or Survival Related

Advertise Here
Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What does a one year supply of food look like? crazympgirlx9 Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 98 01-16-2017 02:57 PM
What is your REPLENISHABLE water supply, per person, per day? Kipper Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 31 01-15-2012 09:58 PM
how do you get one year's supply? Zosimos General Discussion 14 01-04-2012 03:29 PM
TP--What's a year's supply? goose3 Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 83 07-28-2011 04:29 PM
How much food is a year's supply? calypso Disaster Preparedness General Discussion 27 01-25-2011 06:40 PM
NBC's Person Of The Year Spartan300 General Discussion 14 11-28-2010 10:41 AM
carry on person supply get out of town items hank2222 Urban Survival 6 11-15-2010 05:09 PM
Person of the year jkc General Discussion 11 12-16-2009 03:27 PM
Time person of the Year is: Ben General Discussion 27 12-16-2009 12:36 PM

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-04-2011, 12:56 PM
Cumulunimbus Cumulunimbus is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Norway
Posts: 152
Thanks: 273
Thanked 176 Times in 84 Posts
Default



Advertise Here

Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainmansurvival View Post
So what would you substitute for rice?
I would choose a variety of beans, peas, wheat, rye, spelt and emmer. They are all high in both calories and many vitamins and minerals. The proteins in legumes and grains supplement each other. And they all store well.

If you already have a lot of white rice, then eat it when your 2 acres garden really flourishes. Then the empty calories of the rice won’t matter.
The Following User Says Thank You to Cumulunimbus For This Useful Post:
Old 03-04-2011, 01:11 PM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 54
Posts: 61,386
Thanks: 126,722
Thanked 145,070 Times in 42,694 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainmansurvival View Post
So what would you substitute for rice?
You don't really need to eliminate the rice, just suppliment it with other grains too. Again, variety. Wheat is extremely versatile because you can make so many different foods with it, from sprouted wheat, to hot cereal, to breads, biscuits, pancakes and flat breads, and my favorite, fresh pasta. You can find barley and popcorn easily also. There are a bunch of other useful grains such as millet, quinoa, amaranth, etc.

Amaranth is actually very easy to grow and the entire plant is edible and highly nutritious. It grows like a weed in almost any climate or soil condition, is a fast grower so you can start harvesting leaves for greens early on, and has few natural pests. Best of all, the seeds are one of the few plant sources of complete proteins. It's my top survival garden plant.
The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to MikeK For This Useful Post:
Old 03-04-2011, 02:05 PM
vigilant20's Avatar
vigilant20 vigilant20 is offline
Urban Homesteader / MGV
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: West Allis, Wisconsin
Age: 39
Posts: 1,596
Thanks: 1,201
Thanked 3,541 Times in 1,034 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Thread 
Total Awards: 1
Default

I combined the one year supply of grains and beans with the one year traditional supply which includes baking supplies, dairy, fruit, vegetables, seeds, etc. By using the beans and grains as your "fillers", you get a two year supply for just $1200, but still get the variety you need. At that price, I can afford to start using and learning to cook with it at less than groceries would cost. I'll also be supplementing with all the fresh fruits and veggies I can grow and preserve so expect it to last me longer than that. The only thing I've still been going to the grocery store once a month for is dairy, because you can live without shredded cheddar...but I won't until I HAVE to :D
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to vigilant20 For This Useful Post:
 
Old 03-04-2011, 03:39 PM
PistolPackingMama PistolPackingMama is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 329
Thanks: 1,713
Thanked 285 Times in 153 Posts
Default

Get something different to eat for breakfast, oatmeal, Cream of Wheat, Malt o Meal, a multi grain cereal. You're going to want a different taste. I'd consider some dried raisins, cranberries, etc to go with the cereal too. Fruit is higher in calories than veggies. Oatmeal will also make bread taste differently than with just wheat. Same for pancakes.
Old 03-04-2011, 03:52 PM
Summer's Avatar
Summer Summer is offline
Still here...
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: AZ
Posts: 1,153
Thanks: 3,681
Thanked 1,470 Times in 649 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainmansurvival View Post
Honey: 5 pounds honey: (6750 calories) - $56.40 per pound ($282.00)

1 cup honey : 1000 calories
1 1/3 cups per pound: 1350 calories
Not sure were you got your numbers from. A gallon of honey is just under 12 pounds. I can get a gallon locally for about $25-30 dollars and gourmet honey for $55 for a gallon. Top-of-the-line, luxury honeys don't run anywhere near $50/pound.
The Following User Says Thank You to Summer For This Useful Post:
Old 03-04-2011, 04:32 PM
Burtenshaw Burtenshaw is offline
Apocaloptimist
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 232
Thanks: 346
Thanked 214 Times in 102 Posts
Default

Here's what I've found in terms of recommendations for a year of "basics":

Grains, 400 lbs per person (wheat, rice, corn, oats) (LDS)
Wheat, 70 lbs (GP) to 175 lbs (LDS) to 220 lbs per person (Rawles), 45 lbs per 6-gal pail=4-5 pails per person
Rice, 30lbs (Rawles) to 50lbs (LDS) to 70 lbs (GP) per person, 44 lbs per 6-gal pail=1-2 pail per person
Corn, 25 lbs (meal, LDS) to 30 lbs (GP) to 50 lbs per person (Rawles), 45 lbs per 6-gal pail=1 pail per person
Oats, 20 lbs (Rawles) to 25 lbs (LDS) per person, 25 lbs per 6-gal pail=1 pail per person

Beans, 60 lbs per person (LDS), about 40 lbs per 6-gal pail=1-2 pail per person

Fats and Oils
Oil (Olive or Vegatable) 8 qts (2 gal) per person (LDS)
Shortening, 4 lbs per person (LDS)
Peanut Butter, 4 lbs per person (LDS), 40 oz per jar = 10 jars per person
Canned butter
Mayonnaise, 2 qts per person (LDS)
Salad dressing, 1 qt per person (LDS)

Powdered Milk, 16-60 lbs per person (LDS?) or 20 lbs per person (Rawles), 29 lbs per 6-gal SUPERPAIL=1 per person

Honey or Sugars, 50 lbs (Rawles) to 60 lbs per person ( LDS)
Honey, 3 lbs per person (LDS)
Sugar, 40 lbs per person (LDS)
Brown sugar, 3 lbs per person (LDS)
Molasses, 1 lb per person (LDS)
Maple Syrup
Jams and jellies, 3 lbs per person (LDS)
Corn syrup, 3 lbs per person (LDS)
Powdered fruit drink mixes, 6 lbs per person (LDS)

Salt, 5-8 lbs (LDS) to 10 lbs per person (Rawles)
The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to Burtenshaw For This Useful Post:
Old 03-05-2011, 11:36 AM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 54
Posts: 61,386
Thanks: 126,722
Thanked 145,070 Times in 42,694 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Summer View Post
Not sure were you got your numbers from. A gallon of honey is just under 12 pounds. I can get a gallon locally for about $25-30 dollars and gourmet honey for $55 for a gallon. Top-of-the-line, luxury honeys don't run anywhere near $50/pound.
I was in Sam's Club yesterday and their honey was about $5 a pound or so if I remember right.
The Following User Says Thank You to MikeK For This Useful Post:
Old 03-05-2011, 11:44 AM
Summer's Avatar
Summer Summer is offline
Still here...
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: AZ
Posts: 1,153
Thanks: 3,681
Thanked 1,470 Times in 649 Posts
Default

Burtenshaw,

There are a lot of recommendations on your list that you've attributed to the LDS that I haven't seen before such as the peanut butter or molasses. Where did you find this extended list? I'd love to see the source. I'm always trying to collect more information.

Thanks.
Old 03-05-2011, 11:51 AM
Summer's Avatar
Summer Summer is offline
Still here...
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: AZ
Posts: 1,153
Thanks: 3,681
Thanked 1,470 Times in 649 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
I was in Sam's Club yesterday and their honey was about $5 a pound or so if I remember right.
That's about right for one pound. I make mead so I no longer bother with anything under a gallon anymore. It's just not worth it. The upside with meadmaking is that we always have honey on hand if something happens.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Summer For This Useful Post:
Old 03-05-2011, 12:06 PM
Bug Out Nation Bug Out Nation is offline
Hiker
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 588
Thanks: 258
Thanked 606 Times in 274 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cumulunimbus View Post
I would choose a variety of beans, peas, wheat, rye, spelt and emmer. They are all high in both calories and many vitamins and minerals. The proteins in legumes and grains supplement each other. And they all store well.

If you already have a lot of white rice, then eat it when your 2 acres garden really flourishes. Then the empty calories of the rice won’t matter.
While white rice may not be the best for nutrition, it is very close to the top as a filler food. It has a great knack for being used in a variety of ways and it compliments plenty of foods/cooking methods. To me rice would certainly be an essential part of my preps. I would pick up other food types to fill in for the lacking nutritional value, but I would still have the rice either way.
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Bug Out Nation For This Useful Post:
Old 03-05-2011, 12:20 PM
Vanishing Nomad Vanishing Nomad is offline
Improvise Adapt Overcome!
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: North Aurora, IL
Age: 49
Posts: 11,438
Thanks: 5,318
Thanked 11,594 Times in 5,083 Posts
Default

Rice is important, as it will provide the raw calories that will be burned in excess during hard times.
The Following User Says Thank You to Vanishing Nomad For This Useful Post:
Old 03-05-2011, 01:12 PM
mountainmansurvival mountainmansurvival is offline
Prepared
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: The mountains
Posts: 380
Thanks: 77
Thanked 554 Times in 175 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vanishing Nomad View Post
Rice is important, as it will provide the raw calories that will be burned in excess during hard times.
This was my thinking as well. And as I am also including in beans and wheats, I think I am going to keep my rice numbers.
Old 03-05-2011, 03:51 PM
Ryn Ryn is offline
Hunter
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Northern, California
Posts: 1,241
Thanks: 79
Thanked 1,386 Times in 554 Posts
Default

White Jasmine Rice is what I purchase. A serving of jasmine rice contains 200 mg of calcium or 20 percent of the daily value for calcium. It also has about 0.4 mg of iron or 2 percent of the daily value for iron. There is a reason the Asian culture eats rice everyday and it is because they do not intake much dairy products.
Old 03-05-2011, 05:31 PM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 54
Posts: 61,386
Thanks: 126,722
Thanked 145,070 Times in 42,694 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryn View Post
White Jasmine Rice is what I purchase. A serving of jasmine rice contains 200 mg of calcium or 20 percent of the daily value for calcium. It also has about 0.4 mg of iron or 2 percent of the daily value for iron. There is a reason the Asian culture eats rice everyday and it is because they do not intake much dairy products.
Converted rice is also a good prep idea because the parboiling process drives some of the nutrients from the bran into the grain before the bran is removed. It's quite a bit more nutritions than white rice, yet stores longer than brown rice. It also takes less time and fuel to cook.

I've known this for a while, yet I have only recently started to move into buying it. I have no idea why. I guess I've cooked with traditional foods so long that it's hard to adopt new things into my recipes.
The Following User Says Thank You to MikeK For This Useful Post:
Old 03-05-2011, 09:15 PM
lanahi lanahi is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Northcentral Idaho
Posts: 4,806
Thanks: 7,362
Thanked 5,898 Times in 2,477 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainmansurvival View Post
I could use a review and suggestions.

I am setting up 1 year's worth of food per person (Adult). I calculated 2000 calories per day which leads to 730,000 calories per person, per year. I went for long term storage stuff but you should know I am also canning and growing in my BRAND NEW GARDEN! (Yes I am very excited that my garden will very soon be expanded to almost 2 acres)

So, for very basic survival what do you all think of this?

Total calorie needs/person: 730,000 calories per person


White rice: 300 pounds per person (450,000 calories) -$0.3518 per pound ($105.54)

1 cup uncooked rice : 600 calories
2.5 cups per pound : 1500 calories per pound

Pinto Beans: 150 pounds per person: (210,000 calories) - $0.4198 per pound ($62.97)

1 cup uncooked pinto beans : 700 calories
2 cups dry beans per pound : 1400 calories

Black Beans: 25 pounds per person: (34.000) -$0.7952 per pound ($19.88)

1 cup uncooked black beans: 680 calories
2 cups dry beans per pound : 1360 calories

Honey: 5 pounds honey: (6750 calories) - $56.40 per pound ($282.00)

1 cup honey : 1000 calories
1 1/3 cups per pound: 1350 calories

Wheat: 100 pounds per person: (140,000 calories) - $1.00 per pound (wheatsales.com) ($100)

1 pound wheat: 1400 calories

Salt: 10 pounds per person - $0.1552 per pound ($1.55)

Sugar: 25 pounds per person - $0. 5796 per pound ($14.43)

Total Estimated food costs per person: $586.37
You have no source of fats, which are important in SHTF.
You also can get better prices on wheat at least.
It comes down to more than calories...you have to balance out nutrients.
It looks good otherwise.

Try entering the above preps in this calculator and see how it stands as far as nutrients are concerned:
http://beprepared.com/article.asp?ai...cd2=1282093339
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to lanahi For This Useful Post:
Old 03-05-2011, 09:17 PM
lanahi lanahi is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Northcentral Idaho
Posts: 4,806
Thanks: 7,362
Thanked 5,898 Times in 2,477 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
Converted rice is also a good prep idea because the parboiling process drives some of the nutrients from the bran into the grain before the bran is removed. It's quite a bit more nutritions than white rice, yet stores longer than brown rice. It also takes less time and fuel to cook.

I've known this for a while, yet I have only recently started to move into buying it. I have no idea why. I guess I've cooked with traditional foods so long that it's hard to adopt new things into my recipes.
I am buying a little parboiled brown rice which will keep better than regular brown rice. It is still not a LONG RANGE prep, but it's good for well over a year.
The Following User Says Thank You to lanahi For This Useful Post:
Old 03-05-2011, 10:03 PM
Survivalguy72 Survivalguy72 is offline
I love this forum
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 12,043
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9,305 Times in 4,625 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainmansurvival View Post
So what would you substitute for rice?
Lentils. Much better compared to rice which is about the most empty food out there. It is interesting how rarely they are discussed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lanahi View Post
You have no source of fats, which are important in SHTF.
Yeah I see that a lot as well as ovekill on starches. There are going to be a lot of people wanting to kill themselves after that 1000th bowl of beans.
Old 03-05-2011, 10:20 PM
MikeK's Avatar
MikeK MikeK is offline
Walking methane refinery
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Texas
Age: 54
Posts: 61,386
Thanks: 126,722
Thanked 145,070 Times in 42,694 Posts
Awards Showcase
Outstanding Member 
Total Awards: 1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Survivalguy72 View Post
Lentils. Much better compared to rice which is about the most empty food out there. It is interesting how rarely they are discussed.
They're discussed almost every time beans are, same with split peas. They're a bean and not a grain, and as such, not a replacement for grains. Beans combined with grains make a complete protein. That's why so many of us use them as the staples of our food storage. You cover carbs and protein with those simple foods. That only leaves fats and your various vitamins and minerals to cover.

To get the most useable protein out of the bean/grain combination, the ratio tends to run in the 2-3 parts grain to 1 part beans. Hence the larger volume of grains in storage. This is also why we will need to adapt the way we eat. For example, now we might eat a big bowl of beans with a small piece of cornbread. When it really needs to be the other way around.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to MikeK For This Useful Post:
Old 03-05-2011, 10:22 PM
Hick Industries's Avatar
Hick Industries Hick Industries is offline
Live Secret, Live Happy
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Eastern Oklahoma
Posts: 11,131
Thanks: 12,349
Thanked 22,485 Times in 7,016 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cumulunimbus View Post
White rice is totally inferior to other grains and should be avoided in a low calorie diet, unless the rest of your food leans heavily on vegetables and fruits. And not any kind of vegetables and fruits, they have to be varied.

The only vitamin found in any significant amounts in rice is B6, or pyridoxine. But if you include beans and wheat, you won’t have any lack of B6 anyway. The minerals of significant amounts are zinc and copper, but they are at least twice as abundant in beans and wheat.
It is absolutely vital to have a reliable source of carbs during a crisis. Some thing to take the place of our daily bread. If i have an oven of some sort i will just bake bread.

Thoughts about balanced meals and eating a preferred number of fruit and vegetable servings are no a big priority when you've been hungry for a day or two.

Rice works because it is easy to store, easy to carry, and easy to cook. So are wheat, corn, oats, and barley.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Hick Industries For This Useful Post:
Old 03-05-2011, 11:30 PM
lanahi lanahi is offline
Survivor
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Northcentral Idaho
Posts: 4,806
Thanks: 7,362
Thanked 5,898 Times in 2,477 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hick Industries View Post
It is absolutely vital to have a reliable source of carbs during a crisis. Some thing to take the place of our daily bread. If i have an oven of some sort i will just bake bread.
If you don't have an oven, how about fry breads, like tortillas, Indian fry bread, pancakes, etc. Almost all cultures of the world have some kind of flat fry bread, fewer with our kind of bread.

There are also solar ovens, clay ovens, reflector campfire baking, and Dutch ovens, but those are mainly for outdoor cooking, which may be inadvisable during SHTF because of the smoke and smells from them that would attract everyone to your place. Dutch ovens, though, can be used in a fireplace or over a wood or propane stove.

I suggest some popcorn to store because it is the best for making corn meal as well as popping for an occasional treat. Corn will complement beans for a complete protein, and so will just about any kind of grain with beans. It, as well as your grains and beans, can also be planted and most can be sprouted. Sprouts can give you vitamins in the winter time.
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to lanahi For This Useful Post:
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
beans, beans for shtf food, black beans, food for shtf, pinto beans, rice for shtf, shtf food preps, stockpiling beans, stockpiling food, stockpiling rice, survival food, survival food preps



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright © Kevin Felts 2006 - 2015,
Green theme by http://www.themesbydesign.net